How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

  • KaiMikkel
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

I just arrived at another term, both for what comes out of us and the finished end-product (post-treatment) of dry ecological toilets, and that term is "human resource". Finally, a positive meaning for the term "human resources"! :lol:

And, for the segregated end-product, how about "liquid human resource" and "solid human resource"? I was in the midst of listening to the "poopcast" produced by Shawn Shafner that features Sasha Kramer and Kory Russel (available here and had reached the point in the show when the idea of referring to and contextualizing human excreta as "ore" is brought up. "Ore" is good but I think "human resource" might be even better. For posterity....

Kai Mikkel Førlie

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  • DaveBates
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

Human Resource makes me think of Human Resources…..here in the USA that of course is an administrative part of business and government, so to me it doesn’t conjure up the idea that is desired here

I will listen to the video though.

The concept categorically does make sense…..the end product is a “resource that comes from humans”
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  • biosanita
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

Hello everyone,

I made this list of related words while thinking about it.

dry
stabilized / stable
treated
converted
diverted
separated
solids
matter
output
byproduct
conditioner
soil, silt, gravel, lime
reduced risk
neutralized / neutral
denatured

What do you think about "precompost" or "presoil"?

It's not soil and it's not compost, but the product of a UDDT will sooner or later turn into one of those things. That's what we're looking for through sustainable sanitation, right?

I think the term would sound sweet enough at the ears of the uninitiated potential users of UDDTs, and also appeal the propspecting buyers of the matter itself. Like this: 'A UDDT produces dry precompost that can be used as soil amendment' or 'Human precompost is a nutrient-rich fertilizer".
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  • aksingh
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Re: Reply: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

Dear member

Excreta derived compost generated in single or twin pit honey comb underground pits are not very popular in India. It gives assess to sanitation but household owner is not well aware about it. Focus is more on construction to scale up sanitation coverage. In urban areas it is connected to sewer and in rural areas cleaning pits/taking out decomposed material is still taboo and social issue.
Whether it is called with new name or continued with existing one the issues should be tackled socially through strong advocacy professionally.

It is also noticed that composting of the fecal material also depends on geo-climatic and physiography of the sites/zones. The production and its utilistion has not yet been seriously attempted.

thanks

aksingh
India
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  • KaiMikkel
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

DaveBates - When I wrote, "Finally, a positive meaning for the term "human resources"!", I was referring to the fact that most interactions with human resources (as you and I both understand the traditional meaning of the term) can be so mind-numbingly negative. I too hail from the U.S., but your post points out to me how I should have better explained both the term and my use of it. So, apologies to folks from places where the term (even translated) is not used.

Kai Mikkel Førlie

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  • CompostEra
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

A typical large composting toilet has two end-products: one is a liquid derived processed from urine and the other is a solid "composted feces". Having operated serviced and tested both from a larger long-term processing system for almost 50 years, my sense is that the liquid accumulating is more consistently safe because of the salt content. In the US, NSF criteria for such a systen has been set to less than 200 organisms E Coli °44C which coinsides with the standard for generally "swimmable water"
The solid end product however, is more unpredictable concerning the potential pathogen content unless it has been heat sterilized for some considering time (days) and considerable temperature (80°C). This is why the CompostEra does not make a recommendation regarding the solids unless it has been heat sterilized either on- or off-site. But the best policy is to let it shrink ... (there is no hurry to take it out when there is room in the tank) No one can say for sure that the endproducts are 100% safe unless, again, they have been heat sterilized.
I don't know if we need a new term or not but the understanding of the process needs to be expanded. When the municipal standard (which is sewer and sewage treatment is performed according to the convention, it is all but safe for health and the environment and this is one of great dilemmas when the norm is declared safe. We still do not know so new understanding and treatment recommendations are needed.

Enclosed Long-Term Composting Toilets and Greywater treatment ( www.greywater.com )
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  • MichaelCarr
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Re: What do we know about odorous gases from composting toilets (or from composting in general)?

hu·mus 1 (hyo͞o′məs)
n.
A brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter that provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.

This is what i refer to it as when i am discussing the matter - i agree - biosolids is too close to 'sludge'

PS; any Biogas Digester experts here ?
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  • goeco
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Re: What do we know about odorous gases from composting toilets (or from composting in general)?

Both humus and compost are derived from organic matter. For our purposes, humus could be defined as having less "active" carbon than compost. It still contains organic C but this C is more stable (something to do with half-lives and mineralisation rates of soil organic carbon) and because humus isn't a ready food source for organisms to respire it breaks down very slowly.

Compost is a term used for organic matter in varying stages of decomposition, but this hasn't yet decomposed sufficiently to be called humus. Organic matter will "compost" when oxygen and moisture are both present, thus dehydrated feces will only compost and become compost in a further process. I wouldn't try and come up with another name to make it sound more palatable, the term is accurate and should simply be "dehydrated feces".

On the other hand, worms do not eat fresh feces, they digest partially composted feces. This they turn into humus. Yep, rested worm castings derived from feces aren't compost, they are humus.

Sludge is that sticky smelly mud that is essentially the sediment from a liquid digestion process. It can be composted, but feed that stuff to worms and they turn it into humus.

cheers
Dean

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  • hajo
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

Dean, then vermi-composting is actually not 'composting' but 'making humus', thus we use the wrong expression??!! ... or it is a bit of compost after being feces/organic matter and before being eaten by the worms??

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  • goeco
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

I would suggest that our use of the term vermicomposting refers to the process of worms digesting organic material into humus. Eventually compost must become humus, but my use of the term "compost" refers to a wider range in states of organic matter decomposition. Humus being a subset of compost, a later stage whereby the organic C has stabilised. I've found that worms just do this very quickly, for example I have pumped liquid sludge from a septic tank into a vermicomposting digester and the worms have reduced this to humus in two months. All other things being equal but without the worms present it was eventually reduced to humus (composting being the process) but much much slower.

cheers
Dean

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  • hajo
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

thanks Dean, very good explanations when read together with your previous posting.
ciao
Hajo


@Elisabeth: what is difference between 'reply' and 'quick reply'? Has been asked earlier by a user but possibly not answered.

Reply by moderator (Elisabeth): There is no difference. I have put this answer also here now: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/133-re...video-tutorial#18528

We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.
Albert Einstein
Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex... It takes a touch of a genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.
E.F. Schumacher
Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. :-)
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  • Tore
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Re: How should we call the excreta-derived product of a composting toilet or a UDDT? Do we need a new term?

I use the term "Human Fertilizer"

Tore

Sanitation & water consultant in developing countries
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