TDS: SDGs: enough to end the sanitation crisis? - Weekly Summaries

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TDS: SDGs: enough to end the sanitation crisis? - Weekly Summaries

Thematic Discussion
SDGs: enough to end the sanitation crisis?



Weekly Summaries


This thread will contain the weekly summaries from the thematic discussion series to make it easier to stay up to date!

Please feel free to let me know if you have any comments on the summaries by posting here.

Dr. Katrin Dauenhauer
SuSanA Thematic Discussion Series Coordinator
Bonn, Germany
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  • Katrin
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  • I am coordinating SuSanA's thematic discussion series. Let me know if you have any questions!
  • Posts: 71
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Re: Summary for the discussion on "SDG indicators"

Weekly Summary

for


“SDG indicators”

- A Discussion with Sanitation Experts Rose Osinde Alabaster, Operations Desk Officer: WaterLex and Martin Gambrill, Lead Water and Sanitation Specialist, Water and Sanitation Program, World Bank -
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Dear all,

Please find attached the summary for our discussion on "SDG indicators"

The Table of Contents is as follows:

I. Introduction

II. SDGs/Indicators/Sanitation: What are we talking about?

III. SDG Timeline

IV. Are the sanitation indicators adequately defined?
(a) What does “equitable access” mean?
(b) What falls under adequate sanitation?
(c) How can equitable access be achieved?
(i) Status quo:
(ii) Required Next Step – Establishing a baseline
(iii) Required next step – Need for proper targeting and prioritization of sanitation interventions

V. “…for all”: Scaling up to achieve universal coverage
(a) Challenge: Resources, affordability
(b) Challenge: Financing mechanisms, behaviour change, etc.

VI. Data Collection/Management & Monitoring
(a) Enhance data collection
(b) Integrate monitoring frameworks
(c) Challenge: Monitoring at country Level

VII. Monitoring: Case studies
(a) Uganda
(b) Brazil
(c) India

VIII. Setting sanitation indicators in a broader context
(a) WASH in schools
(b) Linking sanitation indicators with those on health and sanitation
(c) Sanitation and sustainability issues
(d) Delivering on sanitation will positively affect other SDGs
(e) Linking different goals will also leverage resources for sanitation
(f) Challenge: Country level

IX. Advocating for special indicators
(a) Gender indicator
(b) Hygiene indicator

X. Role and Significance of “progressive realization” alongside “higher ambition” when it comes to monitoring the
SDGs

XI. Outlook/Food for thought

XII. Bibliography

XIII. List of contributors 

Dr. Katrin Dauenhauer
SuSanA Thematic Discussion Series Coordinator
Bonn, Germany

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  • Katrin
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  • I am coordinating SuSanA's thematic discussion series. Let me know if you have any questions!
  • Posts: 71
  • Karma: 8
  • Likes received: 35

Re: Summary for the discussion on "Prioritising those most in need"

Weekly Summary

for


“Prioritising those most in need”

- A Discussion with Sanitation Expert Louisa Gosling, Programme Manager for Principles: WaterAid -


Dear all,

Please find attached the summary for our discussion on "Prioritising those most in need"

The Table of Contents is as follows:

I. Introduction

II. Equality and Non-Discrimination (END): Checklist

III. Debating the issue of “prioritising those most in need”
(a) Who are those most in need?
(b) Are we truly intending to reach those most in need?
(c) Does it make sense/Is it recommendable to focus on those hardest to reach?
(i) It is easier to focus on different parts of the population
(ii) It is a form of positive discrimination
(iii) It is not the mandate of all stakeholders
(iv) Ending open defecation in rural areas should not be the top priority
(v) It creates tensions with other parts of the population

IV. Problems/Challenges
(a) Inequalities are unaccounted for in official data
(i) People in informal settlements
(ii) Taboo Factors
(iii) Specific populations groups
(b) Finding financing solutions for those most in need
(i) Reaching scale in sanitation
(ii) Subsidies
(iii) Offering low cost options
(c) How good should sanitation systems be for those most in need?

V. Suggestions for inclusiveness
(a) Service Chains
(b) Promotion and awareness campaigns
(c) Indicators

VI. Tasks ahead
(a) Learning about barriers
(b) Looking at service provision as well as monitoring process with regard to equality and non-discrimination
(c) Learn about individual related inequalities
(d) Focus on gender
(e) Discuss WASH in the context of inequalities and the fight for the wider human rights of the most marginalized
(f) Overcoming barriers in service design
(i) Physical barriers and service design
(g) Finding innovative approaches

VII. Outlook/Food for thought

VIII. Bibliography

IX. List of contributors

Dr. Katrin Dauenhauer
SuSanA Thematic Discussion Series Coordinator
Bonn, Germany

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  • Katrin
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  • I am coordinating SuSanA's thematic discussion series. Let me know if you have any questions!
  • Posts: 71
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Re: Summary for the discussion on "Civil Society's Role in Monitoring"

Weekly Summary

for


“Civil Society's Role in Monitoring”

- A Discussion with Sanitation Experts Hanna Woodburn: Global Public Private Partnership for Handwashing and Graham Alabaster, Programme Manager: United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) -


Dear all,

Please find attached the summary for our discussion on "Public Finance at National Level"

The Table of Contents is as follows:

I. Introduction

II. Two levels of indicators

III. Development goals & monitoring
(a) Why is monitoring essential?
(b) Status Quo & Future Prospects
(c) Monitoring requires investment (by national governments)
(d) Where will the resources come from?
(i) Concept of monitoring ladders
(ii) Both formal monitoring and community- collected information are necessary
(iii) Challenge: Get community-collected data accepted

IV. Community-sourced data
(a) Why community-sourced data is important
(b) The problem with using community-sourced data
(c) The problem with not using community-sourced data
(d) Suggestions how problems with community-sourced data can be overcome
(i) Providing Guidelines for Communities
(ii) Provide links between the two sources of data
(iii) Citizen Engagement using ICTs
(iv) Example: WASHWatch platform

V. Additional roles of civil society
(a) Advocacy
(b) Identification and Promotion of Optional Indicators
(c) Make Data Available to Policymakers
(d) Holding governments accountable

VI. Outlook/Food for thought

VII. Bibliography

VIII. List of contributors

Dr. Katrin Dauenhauer
SuSanA Thematic Discussion Series Coordinator
Bonn, Germany

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  • Katrin
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  • I am coordinating SuSanA's thematic discussion series. Let me know if you have any questions!
  • Posts: 71
  • Karma: 8
  • Likes received: 35

Re: Summary for the discussion on "Basic v. Safe Sanitation"

Weekly Summary

for


“Basic v. Safe Sanitation”

- A Discussion with Sanitation Experts Tim Brewer, Policy Analyst: WaterAid and Eddy Perez: Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at Emory University (Former Lead Sanitation Specialist, Water and Sanitation Program, World Bank) -

Dear all,

Please find attached the summary for our discussion on "Public Finance at National Level"

The Table of Contents is as follows:

I. Introduction

II. What is understood by basic and safe sanitation?

III. “Progressive realisation” instead of “basic v. safe”

IV. Long-term holistic strategic plan for sanitation is needed

V. Challenge: Unclear terminology
(a) What is regarded as “safe sanitation” is not entirely clear
(b) Is the “core principle” on sanitation explicitly stated as such?

VI. Challenge: SDG indicators & how will progress be monitored?
(a) Progress on both basic services and safely managed services should be tracked
(b) A Word from JMP
(i) Safely managed sanitation services
(ii) Service levels
(iii) Location
(iv) Avoidance of terms “safe sanitation”/”safe water”

VII. Challenge: What is considered “success” is not just a technical question

VIII. Challenge: Safe or basic – it is also an economic issue

IX. Outlook/Food for thought

X. Bibliography

XI. List of contributors to the discussion

Dr. Katrin Dauenhauer
SuSanA Thematic Discussion Series Coordinator
Bonn, Germany

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