New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

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  • SeanFurey
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New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

Dear SuSanA members

Household investment in sanitation and hygiene has been part of the mainstream WASH conversation for many years - but water supply, not so much. 

Having read an advanced copy of " Self-Supply: Filling the gaps in public water supply provision " more than 3 times now, I can thoroughly recommend it, and I have tried to capture of the some of the key points in the attached briefing .  

In this blog , Dr Sally Sutton explains why she wrote this book

It is free to download so enjoy and I would be interested to hear from those who have experience in household investment in WASH, from latrines and toilets to wells and rainwater harvesting.

Sean

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  • Chaiwe
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Re: New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

Dear Sean,

It is a pleasure to learn that Dr Sally Sutton worked in Zambia, and makes ref to experiences from Zambia throughout her book. Zambia of course, with its high rates of urbanisation, has seen an increase in the number of boreholes being sunk. Dependence on groundwater is even more prominent now in the urban areas, owing to unreliable piped water supply by the relevant authorities and on account of populations that are growing faster than supply can meet. The Water Resources Management Authority(WARMA) was established to manage issues pertaining to water resource management.  In order to protect and to ensure sustainable use of groundwater that is increasingly on the demand. WARMA is supported by the Water Resources Management Act of 2011. Recently the borehole registration levy was introduced by the regulator. www.warma.org.zm/

Pollution of groundwater due to poor sanitation does affect self-supply efforts. In as much as many rely on self-supply, an equal number of populations have (from a sanitation point of view), for a long time, been constructing their own sanitation facilities (septic tanks and latrines) informally and without prescribed standards/ in the absence of standards. This is especially true for urban areas within residential areas in many developing countries, where sanitation facilities are often dangerously close to the borehole water points. A huge bottleneck for self-supply.

Chaiwe
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Chaiwe Mushauko-Sanderse BSc. NRM, MPH
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  • SeanFurey
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Re: New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

Dear Chaiwe
This is definitely one of those areas where the interests of water supply and sanitation intersect. A problem that Self-supply researchers and practitioners find in many/most is the lack of government data on where private water points, which makes regulation doubly hard. I think this is why Self-supply is something that we discuss in much more positive terms in rural and remote contexts because in urban and peri-urban areas, private household supplies, such as shallow wells, are a mixed bag and generally a response to inadequate municipal water systems which should be providing reliable, safe, affordable domestic water.

It is great that Zambia have enacted groundwater regs, and we have an RWSN project with UNICEF which is currently working in WARMA to look at how effective (or not) those regulations are being implemented.

cheers
Sean
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  • Elisabeth
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Re: New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

Hi Sean,
Thanks for telling us about this book! I am wondering if I could interest Sally, or anyone else in the RWSN network with an interest in self-supply, to use content from her book to update the existing Wikipedia article on self-supply of water and sanitation?
See here:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-supply_of_water_and_sanitation

The article was created by Matthias Saladin from Skat four years ago. 

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Elisabeth
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  • SeanFurey
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Re: New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

That's a great idea! It looks like it has been a few years since Matthias has done any edits to it. 
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  • sut1
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Re: Self-supply in water and sanitation

Dear Chaiwe
Thank you for your comments, which, as you say,  are very relevant to the larger urban areas of
Zambia.  And there is a big growth of private boreholes there especially in per-urban areas, where piped supplies are
inadequate. We are looking at self-supply much more in the rural context where only 42% of the population have even a basic public supply and this proportion is increasing by just under 1% a year.  In this case many are resorting to investment in their own supply as an interim move since they may otherwise see no change in their water supply during their lifetime.
Problems arise when regulations which are necessary for urban areas are also applied to rural ones, and when registration (and fees) applied to large drilling contractors are also applied to small local hand-drilling companies.  Regulation is important in areas where resources are under stress but may stifle development in areas where demands on groundwater are far less than the resources available, as is true amongst much of the very low-density rural populations in Zambia.
Self-supply in urban areas is complex, many have shallow wells which are used for bulk water use (washing, bathing, household hygiene) but purchase drinking water from standpipes/ vendors or neighbours’ piped supply.  They are most often aware of the risks for drinking (via community health workers etc), but are looking to avoid carrying large volumes of water to the house (see also Liddle E, Mager S, Nel E, 2014 Case study on Ndola, Bulletin of Geography Socio-economic series).  Others with higher income, are contracting deep drilling to get better quality water in peri-urban areas, piped into the house and often shared with neighbours. There needs to be understanding of  a) the struggles people have to get convenient water as well as good quality water, b) the existing limitations of public
supplies, and c) for utilities to begin to understand urban self-supply and how to work towards its gradual replacement or incorporation into the network where safe, without leaving households worse off than where they are providing for themselves. This is a similar dilemma to that for urban sanitation where public services are yet to reach a large proportion of urban households.

Regards,
Sally
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  • SeanFurey
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Re: New book on Self-supply (the CLTS for water supply...?) downloadable for free

One of the things we talk about with Self-supply is the lack of data on such private water
sources, but perhaps more data exists than we think if sanitation folk are
doing sanitary surveys around latrine and FSM facilities and recording where
water points are in the vicinity? Just a thought.
 
Sean FUREY MSc FRGS
Director, RWSN Secretariat
Rural Water Supply Network(RWSN)
Skat Foundation
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