Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

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  • Elisabeth
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Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

I am copying a post from the RWSN e-discussion from April that was posted by Martín from Honduras in Spanish (English translation below). He is asking whether spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection makes sense? 

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Estimados Colegas

En Honduras, Centro  América  ( no sé si en otros países lo hacen),
un país tropical que actualmente está en la temporada seca  o verano con
temperaturas promedio entre 30 a 40 grados celsius, en varias ciudades han
adoptado la práctica de rociar o fumigar las calles ( en algunas ciudades
pequeñas lo hacen en todas las calles, en otras por sectores) con una solución
de agua clorada con el propósito de desinfectar las calles y prevenir el
contagio de COVID-19. Esto implica un alto costo de la actividad y crea un
sentido de seguridad sanitaria a  la población ( la cual puede hacer que
las personas se confíen y no tomen las medidas adecuadas  y suficientes de
prevención).
Es efectiva esa práctica?..  como pueden  desinfectar las calles si
no conocen el nivel de contaminación que existe o demanda de cloro?.. como el
cloro es un gas, cuanto tiempo se va mantener su efecto residual en la
superficie de la calle?..
Si los rayos ultravioletas son efectivos contra el virus y es uno de lo
desinfectantes que sabemos que funciona...  no existe un efecto
desinfectante en las calles de la ciudad donde hay alta radiación solar y en
donde la superficie del pavimento alcanza temperaturas mayores a 40 grados
celsius?..   no es una desinfección natural, diaria y gratis de las
calles?..   se podría aplicar el mismo concepto para desinfectar ropa
al exponerla todo el dia al sol?

Gracias por sus aportes y sugerencias

Martín Rivera, PhDCoordinador Movimiento Para Todos Por

www.ptps-aps.org
(504)94681772

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Translation by Deepl added by moderator (EvM)

Dear Colleagues

In Honduras, Central America ( I don't know if other countries do),
a tropical country that is currently in the dry season or summer with
average temperatures between 30 and 40 degrees Celsius, in several cities have
adopted the practice of spraying or fumigating the streets ( in some cities
small do it in all streets, in others by sectors) with a solution
of chlorinated water for the purpose of disinfecting the streets and preventing
COVID-19 infection. This implies a high cost of the activity and creates a
sense of health security to the population (which can make
people are confident and do not take adequate and sufficient measures to
prevention).
Is this practice effective?...how can they disinfect the streets if
don't know the level of contamination that exists or demand for chlorine?...like the
chlorine is a gas, how long will its residual effect on the
surface of the street?..
If ultraviolet rays are effective against the virus and it's one of the
disinfectants that we know work... there's no effect
disinfectant in the streets of the city where there is high solar radiation and
where the surface of the pavement reaches temperatures above 40 degrees
celsius?.. is not a free, daily, natural disinfection of the
streets?...the same concept could be applied to disinfect clothes
by exposing it to the sun all day?
Thank you for your contributions and suggestions

+++++++++++
Head moderator of this Discussion Forum
(under consultancy contract with Skat Foundation funded by WSSCC)

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
Independent consultant located in Brisbane, Australia
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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  • Elisabeth
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  • I'm passionate about SuSanA's role in the WASH sector since about 2005. I'm a freelance consultant since 2012 (former roles: program manager, lecturer, process engineer for wastewater treatment plants)
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Re: Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

Copying across a reply that came to the RWSN e-discussion on Covid and WASH - the reply is in Spanish, English translation below:

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Estimado Martîn;

El asunto no es de desinfectar sino lavar o sea alterar o destrozar la
capa del COVID que lleva los Espiculas (the spikes) que le permiten
entrar y infectar nuestras células.

Así que el cloro es una sobre medida. Lavar con Jabón - incluso
ecológico - es suficiente; porque disuelve la capa de protecciôn del virus

También hacer secar ropa lavada el sol es una buena idea.
Por favor confirmen mis declaraciones con su medico.
En breve; romper las espículas del virus es neutralizar el COVID-19.

Aprovecho este mensaje para presentarles una plataforma disponible en
español para #1 atención medica para los pacientes COVID;

Se destina tanto a los hospitales/centros de salud como a los ciudadanos
con su web app para ayudar a caracterizar y clasificar los casos.

Mas info acá

www.interecotec.com/es/covidtestbookingapp/

Manejo la coordinación WeCareUp en la zona ibera y américas

Quedo atento;

*Julián CONSTANT*
Gerente cofundador
AGUASOL LIFE sl,
España - Sevilla - Plaza de Cuba, 3
Oficina Americas - Modelia - Bogotá

www.facebook.com/aguasollife
twitter.com/aguasollife
www.linkedin.com/company/aguasollife
www.aguasol.life

++++++++
Deepl Translation English:
Dear Martîn;

The matter is not to disinfect but to wash, that is to say, to alter or destroy
the  layer of the COVID that carries the spikes that allow you to enter and infect our cells.

So chlorine is an overkill. Soap washing - even ecological - it's enough; because it dissolves the protective layer of the
virus.

Also, it's a good idea to have your laundry dried in the sun.

Please confirm my statements with your doctor.

In short; breaking the spicules of the virus is to neutralize the COVID-19.

I take this message to introduce you to a platform available at
Spanish for #1 medical care for COVID patients;

It is intended for both hospitals/health centers and citizens
with its web app to help characterize and classify cases.

More info here:

www.interecotec.com/es/covidtestbookingapp/

I manage the WeCareUp coordination in the Iberian and American zone

I'll keep an eye out;

photograph
*Julián CONSTANT*
Gerente cofundador
AGUASOL LIFE sl,
Head moderator of this Discussion Forum
(under consultancy contract with Skat Foundation funded by WSSCC)

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
Independent consultant located in Brisbane, Australia
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Twitter: @EvMuench
Founder of WikiProject Sanitation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Sanitation
My Wikipedia user profile: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:EMsmile
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  • Elisabeth
  • Elisabeth's Avatar
    Topic Author
  • I'm passionate about SuSanA's role in the WASH sector since about 2005. I'm a freelance consultant since 2012 (former roles: program manager, lecturer, process engineer for wastewater treatment plants)
  • Posts: 3026
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Re: Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

And another reply - this one is from Gian Melloni:

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Hello, 
I'm replying to the query by Martín Rivera on washing streets with chlorinated
solutions to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Some local authorities did that in Italy in March, but the Italian Ministry of
Public Health disconfirmed any benefits of that practice. This is a link to the
official document, which includes a list of references in English:
www.ilpost.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/73700_1.pdf  
Here are some parts roughly translated into English:

“[...] There is no evidence that walking surfaces are involved in the
transmission of Covid-19. […] There is conflicting information about the use of
hypochlorite and about its capacity to destroy the virus on external surfaces
(roads) or in the air. The effectiveness of sanitization procedures by means of
hypochlorite on complex matrices such as the road surface cannot be
extrapolated in any way from laboratory tests conducted on clean surfaces. […]
Sodium hypochlorite, in conjunction with organic materials that may be present
on the road, could generate extremely dangerous by-products [...]. Furthermore,
the formation of dangerous non-volatile by-products which can contaminate
drinking water supplies cannot be ruled out. […] In conclusion, to date, based
on the scientific knowledge available, there is no evidence of the
effectiveness of sanitizing streets and outdoor paved surfaces with
disinfectant or sanitizing chemical products. Additionally, these procedures
have logistical and economic implications, while they are not beneficial in the
control of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic.” 
I hope it helps,

Gian M.
+++++++++++
Head moderator of this Discussion Forum
(under consultancy contract with Skat Foundation funded by WSSCC)

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
Independent consultant located in Brisbane, Australia
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Twitter: @EvMuench
Founder of WikiProject Sanitation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Sanitation
My Wikipedia user profile: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:EMsmile
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  • mageriv
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Re: Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

Thanks to everyone who has replied  on the topic..  I share the latest news about Spraying disinfectants can be 'harmful', says WHO.. published last Saturday.  See here: https://www.france24.com/en/20200516-spraying-disinfectants-can-be-harmful-says-who

Spraying disinfectant on the streets, as practised in some countries, does not eliminate the new coronavirus and even poses a health risk, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Saturday.  In a document on cleaning and disinfecting surfaces as part of the response to the virus, the WHO says spraying can be ineffective.  "Spraying or fumigation of outdoor spaces, such as streets or marketplaces, is... not recommended to kill the COVID-19 virus or other pathogens because disinfectant is inactivated by dirt and debris," explains the WHO

"Even in the absence of organic matter, chemical spraying is unlikely to adequately cover all surfaces for the duration of the required contact time needed to inactivate pathogens." 
The WHO said that streets and pavements are not considered as "reservoirs of infection" of COVID-19, adding that spraying disinfectants, even outside, can be "dangerous for human health".  The document also stresses that spraying individuals with disinfectants is "not recommended under any circumstances".  "This could be physically and psychologically harmful and would not reduce an infected person’s ability to spread the virus through droplets or contact," said the document. Spraying chlorine or other toxic chemicals on people can cause eye and skin irritation, bronchospasm and gastrointestinal effects, it adds.

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  • ttheath
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Re: Spraying streets with a solution of chlorinated water for the purpose of preventing COVID-19 infection?

Hello 

If helpful please see attached ACF positioning on street spraying during COVID 

Best
Tom

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