Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

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  • Bhaskar
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Re: Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

Ms Jasmine

Growing the native Diatom Algae present in Sewage and all waterbodies is the best Natural solution to treat sewage.
Diatoms consume the nutrients in Sewage, and Fertilizer Runoff, and produce Oxygen.
Thus water becomes clean and oxygen rich.
Diatoms are the best feed for Zooplankton, Herbivore Fish, Oysters, etc.
Thus sewage can be used to grow Oysters and Fish in clean water. 

Couple of reports about Diatoms and Oysters:

Micro-Notes, Issued by the State Microscopical Society of Illinois
[ Vol III March 1948 No. 1]  www.smsi.org/publications/mn194803.pdf  Col 8 on Pg 5

“DIATOMS AND OYSTERS
...
“One reason for which this project is most interesting to microscopists is the fact
that young oysters find their main food supply in plankton of which diatoms are the most
prominent inhabitants. One may almost say no diatoms , no oysters."
---
Phytoplankton:small organisms play big role in Bay
Kent Mountford
 “Along U.S. East Coast estuaries, Dr. Thurlow Nelson of Rutgers University once noted
that the appearance of the abundant and easily recognized plankton
diatom,  Skeletonema costatum, was so connected with success of the
oyster harvest that it was truly a "million-dollar diatom." ”

Phytoplankton: small organisms play big role in Bay | Past Is Prologue | bayjournal.com


---

Thus when Diatoms are grown they need not be harvested, unlike when any other type of algae are grown.
I understand that OSA is using Algae Scrubbers to treat sewage, in these the algae is harvested, this adds to the cost.

We have a solution to grow the Native Diatoms in any type and volume of water
- Tanks, Lagoons, Ponds, Lakes, drains, streams, rivers, oceans, etc. 

I will be glad to give more information, please email me - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Clean technology promoter.

I am working on a clean technology product to grow Diatom Algae in large waterways. Diatoms account for about 25% of all photosynthesis on Earth and hence are the best solution to consume CO2, N and P and oxygenate water and feed fish.

I am a Chartered Accountant but am now an entrepreneur focussed on clean technology.

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  • AjitSeshadri
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  • Marine Chief Engineer by profession (1971- present) and at present Faculty in Marine Engg. Deptt. Vels University, Chennai, India. Also proficient in giving Environmental solutions , Designation- Prof. Ajit Seshadri, Head- Environment, The Vigyan Vijay Foundation, NGO, New Delhi, INDIA , Consultant located at present at Chennai, India
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Re: Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

Dear Researchers et all
We have in urban region, at many occasions urban riverine system passing thro agri belts .
In most of the spaces, the streams are highly polluted with city sewage Etc. In all these agri farms, amidst crops, veggies are grown.
All the veggies produce come to local veg- market and all get sold off in the days sales
 As urbans, we find the products are grown on untreated River streams and are suspect matter.
In our awareness in communities we desire all these produces are consumed not raw but in well cooked form, preferably deep fried versions.
In high temperature all produces are made germs, bacteria e coli clear.
May be kept noted please.
With best wishes 
Prof Ajit Seshadri 
The Vigyan Vijay Foundation Ngo at New Delhi 
Prof. Ajit Seshadri, Faculty in Marine Engg. Deptt. Vels University, and
Head-Environment , VigyanVijay Foundation, Consultant (Water shed Mngmnt, WWT, WASH, others)Located at present at Chennai, India

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Re: Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

Thank you Jasmine for the explanation. I wasn't aware oysters are not eaten raw. 

 

Happy to share this report   authored by Prof. Barbara Evans and others about the public health risks of sewage in rivers and seas in the UK. I assume it will be relevant for the US as well. I like that the report identifies immediate actions to mitigate the impact on public health, long-term opportunities, and enablers for action. Please see the attached image for details.

This article in the BBC quotes the authors and refers to the study. 

Regards, 
paresh
Paresh Chhajed-Picha
Researcher at Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay, India
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Re: Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

Hi Paresh, 

Oysters grown in sewage-polluted water sold as a food product can be harmful to human health because of exposure to pathogens like E. coli, vibrio, or cholera. This is especially threatening to human health because oysters are not usually cooked, they are consumed raw. In the United States, laws prohibit the sale of oysters and other shellfish that pollutants have contaminated.
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  • paresh
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Re: Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

Dear Jasmine,
Thank you for sharing your op-ed with us. There is no disagreement that sewage shouldn't flow into oceans. I am trying to understand why growing oysters in sewage is harmful? The reason I ask is that most fish eaten in Kolkata (one of the biggest cities in India) is bred at East Kolkata Wetland using sewage and it is celebrated as a win-win case. (please see this discussion thread for related details How to construct simple and inexpensive and efficient wastewater treatment systems plants for homesteads ). 

It would be great if you could shed some light on the harms of growing oysters in sewage. 

Regards
paresh
Paresh Chhajed-Picha
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Op/Ed: Oysters shouldn't grow in sewage

The recent incident of  illegal oyster harvesting  in Terrebonne Parish highlights a critical issue plaguing Louisiana's coastline: pollution upstream. While the swift response of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries agents is commendable, there was a missed opportunity to address why our waters are contaminated with sewage.
Human sewage in our waters is common. Most of the year, large swathes of our coastline are closed due to human fecal contamination. Bluntly, we are literally swimming in sewage. The delicious oysters we love to eat are growing in sewage. We deserve better and so does our coastline.

As the executive director of the Ocean Sewage Alliance, I am deeply concerned about the impact of sewage and wastewater pollution on our coastal ecosystems and public health. Outdated infrastructure, poorly maintained on-site wastewater management systems, heavy rainfall (which is often a daily occurrence) and runoff from the Mississippi River exacerbate this problem. Sewage pollution threatens public health, local fishing, oyster and shrimping economies and devastates delicate marine ecosystems. Our Gulf is already in dire, dead-zone conditions.
To tackle this issue, we need an urgent, multifaceted approach. Upstream improvements to sewage and wastewater infrastructure can yield downstream benefits for public health, marine ecosystems and the economy. Stricter regulations to ensure higher quality standards for waters entering Louisiana are essential. Additionally, investment in wastewater treatment infrastructure is crucial to filter pollutants before they exit local waterways into the ocean.

Let's envision a Gulf Coast free of sewage pollution. To do so we must address the giant turd in the room: Where sewage and wastewater are coming from and what we can do to prevent it. By taking proactive steps to prevent pollution and promote environmental stewardship, we can ensure a healthier future for our coastal communities and ecosystems.

JASMINE FOURNIER
executive director, Ocean Sewage Alliance
Published article: www.nola.com/opinions/letters-oysters-sh...cb-d7226813ee96.html
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