Opportunities for mitigating the Solid Waste Management problem within Kitwe, Zambia (sub-Saharan Africa) and resource recovery options

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  • Pat
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Opportunities for mitigating the Solid Waste Management problem within Kitwe, Zambia (sub-Saharan Africa) and resource recovery options

Kitwe is located in the Copperbelt province and is Zambia’s second largest city, like most developing cities Zambia’s effective solid waste management is a challenge. Some of the challenges that Kitwe town faces in waste manage include:
a)     Indiscriminate dumping;
b)     Transportation system is not reliable and efficient due to frequent breakdowns;
c)     Lack of facilities for weighing solid waste at final disposal;
d)    Lack of financial support from the government;
e)     Lack of public education aimed at reducing and separating solid waste; and
f)      Lack of enforcement of laws.

Solid waste collection and disposal from the central business district, market places and households account for about 23% of the waste handled by the Kitwe city council. Private companies handle about 5% of generated waste in the city. One of the major private companies, the Copperbelt Solid Waste Management company (COP-waste) handles about 12% and about 60% of the waste is uncollected. These figures show that there is underutilization of valuable  waste streams and hence showing that the public does not generally view waste as a resource. This limitation in competition for waste management opens up a number of opportunities for mitigating the solid waste problem in the city.
Some of the opportunities for mitigating the solid waste problem in the city include:
  • Promoting participation by private companies by getting them involved in the management of waste.  Kitwe has more than 60% of waste uncollected. The lack of adequate equipment for transportation and handling of waste can be resolved by establishing agreements with stakeholders who can purchase equipment, which can be hired to the city council and other private companies at affordable prices.
  • There are also opportunities for small enterprises to collect and compost it for resale to farmers and garden owners.
  • And committee members for big markets, such as the Chisokone market can create jobs by employing people to collect, separate waste for re-use or recycle or reselling to recycling companies.
Kitwe as a city and  Zambia as a country at large has a number of resource recovery options that can be put in place to create valuable
products from generated waste. Some of these options are already implemented by individuals at small scale and hence need funding to grow. Stakeholder groups can be formed that are able to fund ideas and innovations of recycling solid waste. Some of the ideas could include:
  1. The making of compost from organic waste collected as it is the majority of waste collected. Educating farmers that high yields can also be obtained by incorporating compost in farming. By going organic, the compost product can be used to amend the soil by replenishing it with organic matter which will improve the overall soil conditions, developing and maintaining structure, improving physical properties, decreasing susceptibility.
  2. The making of weaved recycled plastic bags, plastic brooms from plastic bottles
  3. Making of feedstocks, such as paper mills, metal smelters and plastic manufacturing facilities.
  4. Waste-to-energy options in Kitwe can be done by adopting maximum recycling with waste-to-energy ideas in an integrated waste management system which would significantly reduce dumping in Kitwe. Waste-to-energy technologies are available that can process unsegregated low-calorific value waste, and industry is keen to exploit these technologies in places like Kitwe. 
Alternative thermal treatment processes to combustion include gasification, pyrolysis, production of refuse derived fuel and gas-plasma technology.  Therefore, although other waste minimization options exist, recycling and composting are an accessible way to empower communities, generate income and provide an excellent opportunity for initiating waste minimization programs and resource mobilization in Kitwe.
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  • Gerry
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Re: Opportunities for mitigating the Solid Waste Management problem within Kitwe, Zambia (sub-Saharan Africa) and resource recovery options

Your suggestions regarding source separation and composting are very sound. Also making food waste and other high protein materials into hydrolysate are a very, very simple way to get high value from materials at a very local level.
The concept of utilising local materials for local benefit also can produce local employment in local centres.
The notion of energy from waste does not make any sense. Any soil in the world which has been used for agriculture will need all the organic matter it can get which can be provided by composts, as you suggested.
The only things which will burn in an incinerator are organic in origin and these should be used as liquid fertiliser, composted or recycled in local value-add processes. Can I suggest you contact John Wilson in Zimbabwe, if you need related information on the subjects. His email is: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Also you can see my web site under the "latest News' pages for a range of free information of organics processing: 
www.gerrygillespie.net/
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  • Pat
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Re: Opportunities for mitigating the Solid Waste Management problem within Kitwe, Zambia (sub-Saharan Africa) and resource recovery options

Hi Gerry,
In response to your comment.  It is very possible and infact a number of countries with a well organised waste collection system are embarking on the waste to energy project.  For example the Reppie plant in Ethiopia, commissioned in 2018, designed to  generate electric power from solid waste collected.
France alone also has about 126 waste-to - energy plants,  while Germany has about 121 and Italy about 40. 
 Patricia 
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