Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries

  • alibey
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Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

I'm researching areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries. But I'm not finding enough data on % of piped sewer connections that are treated in urban areas. Does anyone know where to find good coverage data? JMP posts some statistics on it, but I don't find much that exclusively focuses on urban areas in developing world cities. Like what is the status quo of wastewater reuse in developing cities? I think it is mostly partially treated sewage used for agriculture irrigation, which I have seen in Mexico City, and without killing pathogens that is a major health risk.
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  • muench
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Re: Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

Dear Anna,

When you say "indirect reuse" what do you have in mind? And are you looking specifically at municipal wastewater for reuse in agriculture, or also products from onsite systems, i.e. fecal sludge, dried feces or urine?

There is a new book on resource recovery from IWMI that probably has lots of good data (not sure if it's available as a free pdf file or if you have to purchase it):
forum.susana.org/98-resource-recovery-fr...e-recovery-from-imwi

There is also this book from 2016 by UNEP and SEI:
forum.susana.org/98-resource-recovery-fr...ecovery-unep-and-sei
"Sanitation, Wastewater Management and Sustainability: from Waste Disposal to Resource Recovery"

You might also find more leads in this forum category:
forum.susana.org/98-resource-recovery-fr...sludge-or-wastewater
and here:
forum.susana.org/40-greywater-blackwater...ter-reuse-irrigation

And then there are also all the SFDs (shit flow diagrams) for many cities in developing countries. They might also have this kind of information for you. Take a look here:
forum.susana.org/204-shit-flow-diagrams-...xcreta-flow-diagrams

Or directly on the SFD portal here: sfd.susana.org/

Please let us know how you get on with this, and what you are finding.

Resgards,
Elisabeth

Community manager and chief moderator of this forum via SEI project ( www.susana.org/en/resources/projects/details/127 )

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
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  • Payd
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Re: Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

Dear Anna,
Indirect wastewater use is probably 30 times more common (area-wise) as direct reuse but due to its nature still not well captured in stats, like FAO's Aquastat which might come closest. However, the extent has now been estimated (see iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa75d1/meta which is an open-access paper).

Dear Elisabeth, thanks for mentioning our new book. The last three cases in its water section are indeed on indirect wastewater use, which are usually situated in the informal reuse sector calling for innovative ways to enhance safety. We are discussing here, for example, a corporate social responsibility (CSR) model based on experiences from Africa.
This book by IWMI, EAWAG and CEWAS is on RRR business models ( www.routledge.com/9781138016552 ) looking at water, nutrient and energy recovery, mostly in the global South, and we would be happy if its arrival could also be made known in other SuSanA posts. For now, it is available as hardcopy and e-book (see link or flyer), but from early July 2018 on, we will be allowed to post a free pdf on our IWMI website to which SuSanA could link (I will post then an update). We are not yet sure if we will get permission to split the file as the whole book might be 120MB, difficult to download.
We can also post hardcopies or e-book codes from our own stock for free to lecturers running sanitation, waste or business curricula and who are interested in integrating the book in their teaching. We are working with CEWAS on the development of related modules to support such an uptake. With its nearly 50 case studies which led to the presentation of 24 business models, the book targets mostly civil engineering students interested in cost recovery and profit models, as well as business students interested in the waste and sanitation sectors.
Best regards,
Pay (IWMI)
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  • alibey
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Re: Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

Thank you for your replies! I did end up looking into SFDs and presenting on the Dakar case study rather than rely on worldwide statistics. Definitely, FSM is something I want to learn more about too, I'll look out for that book when it's available.
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