Theme 2: Implementation Level

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  • JovanaD
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level


Capturing pupils' perceptions on toilet facilitates in schools


With the aim to get pupils’ perspective on water, sanitation and hygiene conditions in schools, the European Environment and Health Youth Coalition (EEHYC) conducted a Survey on hygiene knowledge, attitude and practice in Lithuania (Vilnius city and district), Romania (Piatra Neamt town) and the Republic of Moldova (nationwide). More than 2000 students from three countries, aged between 12 and 19 years, have been included in the study.

The main results and findings point out that less than 30% of respondents in all countries use the toilet in schools regularly. Most of the respondents (ca. 50%) use it sometimes or only when absolutely necessary. Students (ca. 70% in all countries) highlighted that unpleasant smell in toilet rooms is a major reason for toilet avoidance, followed by the lack of cleanliness, absence of hand and menstrual hygiene equipment, lack of privacy etc.

The acceptability of school toilets is one of the most common problems in the pan-European region. Yet, students are rarely consulted about this matter. Without the input of school children, however, it is unlikely that a significant reduction in toilet avoidance can be made. Security, privacy, dignity, comfort, shame and convenience are all dimensions of toilet use on which many engineers and public health surveillance staff need more user input and feedback.

The study was implemented with the financial and technical support of the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in the framework of 2014-2016 program of work of the Protocol on Water and Health.

For detailed per country results please visit: www.eehyc.org
Jovana DODOS

WASH & Public health consultant
WASH & Nutrition specialist
Expertise & Advocacy Direction
ACTION CONTRE LA FAIM | ACF-France
www.actioncontrelafaim.org

Vice-president and co-founder
European Environment and Health Youth Coalition
www.eehyc.org

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Skype: joja.cosmopolitan
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  • CWendland
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

Dear all,

please be reminded that we in the WG7 have created a collection of sustainable WASH in School stories on the SuSanA wiki.

You find 26 stories from all over the world on the wiki when you go SuSanA Wiki -> WG 7 -> School Stories
see also attachment

You are invited to place your own story there, if you have any interesting case to share!
The wiki is open to be edited by Forum members. If you have any questions how to use the wiki, please let me know,

best regards
Claudia
Claudia Wendland
Water and Sanitation Specialist
HAMBURG WASSER
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.hamburgwasser.de
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  • ThomasLangkau
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

In relation to the previous post and the School Stories on the SuSanA wiki:

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  • Wanjihia
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

I would like to share our good practices and lessons learnt we have acquired during the implementation of WASH Programmes in Kenya, based on the outcomes of different knowledge sharing workshops, feedback from consultants and discussions with the Kenya programme colleagues.

Engagement with schools
Clear school mobilization strategy: our experience in the engagement with institutions, for instance schools, highlight also here the need for a clear and systematic mobilization strategy that defines the process of stakeholder engagement. The community mobilisation strategy will therefore also contain a manual for the engagement with schools.

Clear Memorandum of Understanding: it is crucial to formalise our relationship with all stakeholders present at the school in a clear MoU that defines the roles and responsibilities of each parties. The MoU should clearly outline:
• The objective, scope and duration of the project;
• Results and activities of the project;
• The commitments of each of the three parties (BoM, government, Caritas or its local partner, signing the agreements;
• Selected representatives of each of the three parties;

Partner with the school management: the BoM is in charge of the school. Any engagement with the school must therefore start with a meeting with the BoM. It is essential to engage in a transparent dialogue with the BoM about its plans and priorities with regard to WASH already at the pre-assessment stage. This will build a sound basis for a balanced partnership throughout the project implementation.

Collaboration with the head teacher: the head teacher is the secretary to the BoM and supervises the day-to-day activities within the school, holding a central position within the school. His buy-in is therefore essential to the success of any WASH intervention in school. He also informs the BoM and the parents of the latest developments and further requirements of the school. In most cases, the head teacher becomes our contact person within the school. We therefore need to engage in an open dialogue with the head teacher from the beginning and involve him/her in key activities such as the training of trainers of CHAST. Moreover, we can support the head teacher in the communication with the BoM, the parents and his staff – for instance by providing a summary of the project objectives and activities, the support required by each group, and key hygiene messages.

Operation & Maintenance
Including local artisans in O&M trainings: we train community groups in the management of water points. In schools, we train BoMs and caretakers in O&M of the water points, the latrines and handwashing facilities. In both cases, local artisans that are engaged in the construction of infrastructure should be included in the training to build their technical capacities in O&M.

O&M trainings and follow-up trainings: building capacities in O&M is an integral component of all our interventions. Refresher trainings and follow-ups are also part of any intervention which need to be realised well before the project ends.

Finances as part of O&M: roles and responsibilities, also with regard to financing repairs and spare parts, must be defined and clearly assigned during the O&M training. An action plan needs to be developed as part of the O&M training. Follow-up sessions will help the trainees translate the agreed measures into concrete actions.

O&M Manual: we have developed an O&M manual for schools, which guides the training of the BoM and will be handed over to each school. For each project location the manual needs to be adapted to include a list of local suppliers/providers for needed spare parts and materials or desludging services.
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  • cecile
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  • I am a free lance environmental consultant. I undertake socio-economic studies and research in sanitation projects and translations. I am a former business developer for Ecodomeo (vermicomposting UD toilets manufacturer).
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

Dear Wanjihia,

Welcome to the forum and thank you for sharing your experience.
Could you please explain the acronym BoM? and CHAST ?
When you say "we have developped..." who is we ? What organisation are you part of ?
How many schools did you tackle ?

Thanks!
Cécile Laborderie
MAKATI Environnement
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  • former member
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

THe GSAP Microflush toilet has been successfully implemented in many schools in SSA especially in Kenya and Ghana. It encourages handwashing after use as the handwash water (~150 cc) is used to do the next toilet flush. It is about money as you cannot build toilets without some capital but often older children assist with the fabrication and that can help with the costs.
Regarding handwashing outside the toilet, GSAP and the S-Lab have developed a handwash program focusing not only on the physical component but also on the behavioral as well. Both parts are quite innovative, minimize costs, and have the potential to lead to an enduring program at schools. In spite of many expensive efforts to effect a sticky habit of handwashing at schools, efforts such as Global Handwash Day, there has been only limited success. On Global Handwash Day, the chief or administrative executive in the village will often get the water tank at the school filled, posters are made, a celebration is had, photos are taken (often the wrong images - of a child under a faucet with water freely flowing over hands and face) and yet a few weeks later it is as if the day never happened. We have been working on an intervention that was introduced at 4 schools in Ghana, 3 of which continue the program (at the 4th school, the headmistress said handwashing with soap isn't necessary and so she cancelled the program). We are preparing a flyer on the details of the intervention and this will be finished and available by the end of next month. Contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like to receive a copy. On the question, "is more money needed", there is no such thing as a program without some cost but what is needed even more is "commitment".
..Steve

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  • BelindaA
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  • Belinda Abraham
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

Absolutely programmes need money to run! But often what is more important is commitment, as mentioned in the last post. The question is how do we build the commitment by the Education officials to take on WASH in schools- fully? A number of examples have been suggested. Such as in the monitoring, Educational Information Management Systems (EMIS), which hold schools accountable for WiNs and are often linked to budget allocations for Ministries. Another suggestion in breaking WiNs into do-able actions. It is always easier to gain commitment if it is in a stepwise approach leading to a bigger goal. The last post brings together equally an important point that the right technology options- simple, usable, durable and desirable must be available in order for sustained WiNs and commitment. Other posts also talk about the importance of educating the educators? So does WiNs need more money? Perhaps no, but commitment. However, it still begs the question, what can we as WASH sector do to ensure this commitment- what are some specific strategies at implementation level?
Belinda Abraham

Hanoi, Vietnam
+84 (0)1685580482
skype: Belinda.Abraham2

Recently joined as of May 2018, East Meets West (EMW)/ Thrive Network as Country Director/ Regional Program Director based in Viet Nam. New programming areas: WASH- PPP's, social enterprises, FSM and School WASH (WiNs) with a focus in South East Asia.

Career profile: WASH Specialist, over 15 years in Eastern and Southern Africa, South East Asia, primarily working for UNICEF.
Key areas of interest: WASH in Schools, WASH Communication and Community-based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion
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  • BelindaA
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

In the case of schools reverting back from three star to open defecation or poor conditions, is this not a question of monitoring and enforcement? It is one thing to set-up a three star system but unless there is a institutionalised system within education to monitor the situation in schools, they will revert back! It's human nature- like diets or going to the gym, unless there is a built-in incentive to do something, it is our nature to revert back to norms! So therefore how do you change norms in schools? Creating programmes which develop new habits, routines and behaviours are importants. But I believe equally important is monitoring. How can guided monitoring better enforce changes in norms? Who is held accountability when schools revert? These are important questions to be posed and addressed in programme design. Sorry for my delay in responding back to you!
Belinda Abraham

Hanoi, Vietnam
+84 (0)1685580482
skype: Belinda.Abraham2

Recently joined as of May 2018, East Meets West (EMW)/ Thrive Network as Country Director/ Regional Program Director based in Viet Nam. New programming areas: WASH- PPP's, social enterprises, FSM and School WASH (WiNs) with a focus in South East Asia.

Career profile: WASH Specialist, over 15 years in Eastern and Southern Africa, South East Asia, primarily working for UNICEF.
Key areas of interest: WASH in Schools, WASH Communication and Community-based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion
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  • Wanjihia
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

From the pictures shared by Belinda to move from picture A to picture B it require the following:
  • Change of mind set of the children and the teachers by them developing a culture of cleanliness and proper use of the latrines;
  • Teachers as role models. ‘Practice what you preach’. For that, they should also portray good hygiene behaviours, including use of latrines and hand washing facilities – both at schools and at their households;
  • Integrating hygiene and sanitation education in the school curriculum: The legislative framework in the education sector in different countries should give scope for CHAST to be included in the curriculum;
  • Promoting behavior change;
  • Using what they have without expecting external support;
  • Believing in the kids and supporting them to maintain their sanitation facilities because they are capable.
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  • Wanjihia
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

Thanks CHAST means Children Hygiene and Sanitation Training
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  • Wanjihia
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

We is Caritas Switzerland and we have been working with 21 schools for the last one and half years. Our core activities is WASH in schools and Caritas Switzerland have been in this sector for the last 15years
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  • Wanjihia
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Re: Theme 2: Implementation Level

Dear Cecile I hope I have answered your questions.
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