Thematic Discussion 8: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors (14-22 April)

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  • DormanNapitu
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Dear all,
When discuss "community leaders/CL" we need to put clearly definition for "CL". Is "Religion Leader/RL" also part of CL, particularly RL at village level?
In fact, through their strategic role and function, the RL can eager and facilitate community to practice "clean and health WASH behaviour". However, in many cases, WASH program initiator, particularly from Government side, not involve the RL properly.
So if answer is YES, to emphasize role of CL/RL, it is needed :
1. Strengthen their knowledge regarding on WASH issues
2. Train communication and advocacy
3. Enhance their ability to handle techical (simple techical) aspect in WASH area, like: to built handwash facility, simple latrine, water purifier, etc
4. Strengthen their capacity to open access to policy maker

Thanks,
DormanNapitu
Wahana Indonesia Membangun (WinDevelopment)
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  • Darrens
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Plan USA and UNC Water Institute have been collaborating on a 4 year, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant (*) that examines the role and relative effectiveness of 'local actors' in facilitating CLTS, driving latrine coverage and achieving ODF status. Local actors in this instance were natural leaders (the focus of our Ghana pilot); teachers (the focus of our Ethiopia study) and district level managers in government (the focus of our Kenya pilot). We also examined the role of local actors and CLTS in rapid evaluations of CLTS programs in 7 additional countries (Haiti, Uganda, Niger, Cambodia, Indonesia, Nepal and Timor Leste).

Using RCTs (Ghana) and quasi-experimental research design (Ethiopia) we were able to measure the effect of local actors as compared to NGO-staff led CLTS interventions. In Ghana alone, we found an average of 20% point improvement in CLTS outcomes using natural leaders (when compared to NGO staff) and in Ethiopia a roughly 13% improvement (although, interestingly, in our study, HEWs were still seen as driving better outcomes).

A suite of outputs including policy and practice high level summaries, case study reports from the 7 countries outlined above and videos highlighting this work are available at the following site: waterinstitute.unc.edu/clts/

Darren Saywell
Senior Director - Water, Sanitation and Health
Plan International USA

(*) Added by moderator: See a discussion of this grant here on the forum:
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-comm...hiopia-and-ghana#682
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  • knsenkyire111
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Hi, for a behavioural change strategy to take effect, it should be well targeted to the beneficiaries. Whether rural communities or urban poor communities, there is an element of "Poor" involved in both settings. The behavioural attitude of the poor is that they hardly show interest or participate in sanitation programs. One strategy can be directed at Breaking the barriers between the Poor and the Market. This can be achieved by organising events and activities such as "Toilet Fair" through which they would be sensitized on the types of toilet available and be guided to make a choice on the that befits their locality. The dangers and harm of open defecation can also be preached. The events and activities should be taken to their doorsteps with the CBOs and other community leaders and members serving as actors or being part of the outreach team.
Thank you.
Kofi Nsenkyire
Wwfc Ghana representative
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  • fuahmed
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Dear all,

We have some experience on Working with the Community leaders for WASH program implementation and have history of sanitation situation improvement in Bangladesh which I tried to share with you in attached file.

Thanks

Furqan
Furqan Ahmed

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  • fuahmed
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Dear all,

This is a very good Forum to learn to share experience.

We have some experience on Working with Community Leaders on WASH Program implementation in Bangladesh which I attached herewith to share with you.

Thanks

Furqan
Furqan Ahmed

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  • janita
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  • Hygiene Specialist at UNICEF NYHQ
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Hi all, this is a very interesting and important discussion, as we believe that successfully engaging local authorities is the key to a sustainable impact of any program. In Cambodia, WaterSHED works with local commune councilors (elected through popular vote) to increase sanitation coverage in rural areas. Implementing a market-based approach, WaterSHED helps local business to improve their sanitation products and services, engages and facilitates local leaders to stimulate demand, and connects supply and demand side. We found that recognition is a very strong driver to motivate these local leaders. More than 20% of the commune councilors we work with have identified “recognition” as their top value (followed by knowledge, responsibility, and honesty). Equally, in qualitative interviews we found shaming/recognition by their supervisors for poor/good results in sanitation to be a strong driver of their engagement.

Thus, WaterSHED has set up a leadership development program geared to foster leadership capacity at local level. Over a course of nine months, commune councilors meet every three months to discover new leadership skills (having a vision, setting goals, making plans, teamwork, communication skills, emotional intelligence, overcoming fear, etc.). The participants are then set a “leadership challenge”, which consists of increasing sanitation coverage in their constituency (usually 2,000 – 4,000 households, baseline sanitation coverage 25-35%), to put their leadership skills into practice. After three months, results are reviewed, presented and discussed at the beginning of the next conference and the strongest leader (identified through a voting system) is recognized for the achievement with a medal, certificate, trophy, and confetti canon. The commune councilors pay into this program ($45 participation fee).

An overview and evaluation of the pilot project can be found on our website. Here and there is some video footage of the program.
We have made great experience unlocking latent leadership behavior with this program. Two of the communes that participated in the pilot project are now (28 months later) almost ODF and recognition for the work (originally provided by the project) now comes from the community itself.

Janita
WaterSHED Cambodia
Hygiene Specialist at UNICEF NYHQ working on hygiene (including hygiene in emergencies and menstrual health and hygiene) as well as WASH and nutrition integration
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  • cecile
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  • I am a free lance environmental consultant. I undertake socio-economic studies and research in sanitation projects and translations. I am a former business developer for Ecodomeo (vermicomposting UD toilets manufacturer).
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Hello,

@ Furqan : What are LIGS and LIGS(UP) ?
Somebody else mentionned CTLS vs SLTS. What is SLTS?

I agree with Rajan that the goal is to identify the "right" person(s) or the "right" organisation(s).
In my experience a project is introduced to all the stakeholders but you cannot predict which leaders will really show enthusiasm and will be able to give momentum to the project . Sometimes you find the mayor of the project will support the cause greatly and sometimes not, same for religious leader or youth association.
In one project I worked in we found that the youth association was not interesting in water, sanitation and waste but an association of young activists played a great role in delivering messages in the communities through PHAST training workshops and Wash in school. Their enthusiasm played a significant role in changing people's attitudes. In the same project, one of our staff member, championned the cause, got elected after the end of the project and a couple of years later the village got a prize for the cleanest village !
I am aware that we always want to implement the project on a large scale but the same recipe does not work for all villages. I believe that identifying the leaders which will be able to encourage people to change attitude requires time and a good familiarity with the setting and subtle balance in each village or city district or slum.
Cécile Laborderie
MAKATI Environnement
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  • STAROPK
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Dear All,
A Very Happy And Good Day To All Of You

Very interesting discussion highly appreciated; my point is community leader are one of the best option along with the appointed leader at the same time. As in first reply the corruption culture was taken into consideration which is very true. The appointed leader will also play a role of monitoring for Natural Community Leader. For selecting this option we also need to educate the Natural Leader on WASH importance and its effects on behavior change and than ultimate outcome.

I strongly believe that hardcore provision in WASH is highly important but SOFT-CORE is more important. Putting emphasis on soft-core would develop or create the demand of hardcore and once the hardcore (latrine, hand pump etc) is provided to them they will take care of it better because sustainability of the hardcore is major issue.

I have witnessed that less stress is given on the soft-core which has not changed the behavior but for the time being. furthermore children are the driving force of the change in this. if we can educate children on this in a way that they find it interesting this will later change it in habit and this habit will become their nature. Also mothers they are the most important entity in any intervention we do educate gender but we need to target mothers especially in this case to create big impact and behavior change.

Things we need to do.

1. lectures or training's to community leaders.

2. Fun loving attitude with children to adopt the practice (hand washing, using of soap etc)

3. Educating Mothers or young mothers.

4. Continuous education of soft-core regardless of the provision of hardcore.

5. Community level seminars etc.


Best regards,


Syed Mohammad Uzair Shah

Chief Executive
STARO
Syed Mohammad Uzair Shah

Chief Executive
Social Transformation And Rehabilitation Organization
STARO
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
0092 321 910 0012
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  • fuahmed
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Hi cecile,

I am also agreed that choosing of right individuals and right organization which can mobilize community are very important.

Thanks for your query about LGIs(UP).

I actually mentioned LGIs (UP)that means Local Government Institutions and in Bangladesh lowest tire of local government called as Union Parishad (UP)who are elected by the community people from their own community. They are responsible for Community level development initiatives and they are responsible for collection of taxes. They are supported by the central government and Central government also provide development budgets directly to them. Different international organization also need to consult with them for taking any development initiatives for the respective unions.

If you have any queries please ask me.

Thanks

Furqan
Furqan Ahmed
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  • fuahmed
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

SLTS means School Led Total Sanitation where school children learn and play key role in mobilizing family and the communities for Total sanitation and hygiene behavior practices.
Furqan Ahmed
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  • ErinR4D
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

Hi Darren,

Thank you for providing a summary of your research on natural leaders in CLTS interventions. The study results were really insightful.

You mentioned that HEWs were still found to have driven better outcomes in CLTS. Would you happen to have any assumptions on why that may be the case?
Erin Swearing
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Results for Development Institute
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  • ErinR4D
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Re: Thematic Discussion: Working with Community Leaders to Change WASH Behaviors

There has been a lot of great conversation on here! Thank you to all those that have shared so far.

Based on the discussion over the last few days, I think that we agree that working with natural leaders for the promotion of CLTS is very advantageous for due to a host of factors like trust and direct, demonstrated community involvement. Many of you all have shared experiences of work you have done in which you have utilized natural leaders to promote sanitation.

It would be worthwhile to know if anyone has insights on using natural leaders outside of CLTS.
  • Why aren't natural leaders being used more outside of CLTS?
  • Are there barriers to doing so?
  • How would you suggest that people get started when considering working with natural leaders?

Please feel free to share your experiences and recommendations.

Best,
Erin
Erin Swearing
Program Associate
Results for Development Institute
1111 19th Street, N.W, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036 USA
Office: +1-202-792-4817
Fax: +1-202-470-5712
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.r4d.org
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