Concerned with increased open defecation in Western Zambia (Maboshe Memorial Centre)

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Concerned with increased open defecation in Western Zambia (Maboshe Memorial Centre)

Maboshe Memorial Centre (MMC) Executive Director Maboshe Patrick speaking people is saddened with the increased open defecation in some districts of Western Province.

Maboshe observed that most parts of districts lack decent toilets thereby contributing to increased open defecation.

Open defecation poses great health hazard not only to selected segment of a certain society but to the all entire nation, Maboshe said.

Maboshe who was on a tour of the districts called for inclusion of all traditional leaderships, government officials in the fight against the trend in the area.

Maboshe said open defecation does not only disturb public sights but also creates ideal environment for the outbreak of transmissible diseases.

Open free defecation goal cannot be realized without full involvement of all the people and asked stakeholders and the entire community to be steadfast in the implementation of the cleaning campaign exercise Maboshe said.

Maboshe urged the people of districts to stand up in large number and tighten-up hygienic measures in order to avoid communicable diseases in the area.

It was disheartening to note that Western Province is currently standing at 7 percent rate in hygiene when the country is advocating for achieving free open defecation by the year 2020, Maboshe said.

Maboshe observed that lack of proper knowledge and sensitization to the people on the subject was a great contributing factor to the current augmenting opening defecation in the province and called for an urgent action against the vice.

Maboshe is in Western Province working with civic leaders, government officials and the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE) in combating open excretion.

Issued by Maboshe Memorial Centre (MMC) Media Team.
Website: www.maboshememorialcentremmc.yolasite.com
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  • Maboshe
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Re: OVER 2.5 MILLION ZAMBIAN STILL PRACTICE OPEN DEFECATION

Over 80% of diseases in Zambia emanate from lack of access to improved sanitation. According to the 2012 World Health Organisation (WHO) monitoring report, over six million people in Zambia live without access to toilets and improved sanitation.

Diarrhoea is the third largest killer of children under the age of five in Zambia. This is especially prevalent in rural areas where less than half of all rural women and men (43%) use soap or another appropriate medium to wash their hands after relieving themselves and before cooking and eating.

Maboshe Memorial Centre (MMC) Executive Director Patrick Maboshe says open defecation is still the biggest challenge Zambia is facing today.

Maboshe says it is shocking that after 52 years of independence people in the country are still using the bush to answer the call of nature hence contaminating the environment.

He says it will be difficult for Zambia to attain open defecation free status by 2020 if people’s mind set is not changed.

Maboshe has since called on Zambians to take the issue of constructing toilets seriously if the aim of attaining free defecation status is achieved by 2020.

He said over 80% of diseases in Zambia emanate from lack of access to improved sanitation.

According to the 2012 World Health Organisation (WHO) monitoring report, over six million people in Zambia live without access to toilets and improved sanitation. Out of these six million people, 2.5 million practice open defecation.

Maboshe Rural Water Initiative (MRWI) is a Maboshe Memorial Centre (MMC) approach aimed at encouraging and empowering local communities to stop open defecation (OD) and start building and using latrines.

Maboshe said lack of access to improved sanitation contributes to the high prevalence of diarrhoeal diseases adding that there was need for local solutions and innovations aimed at enhancing sanitation and ending open defecation.

“Open defecation is not a reflection of poverty but a traditional practice which has continued to exceedingly contribute to the high cases of disease outbreaks such as cholera in our communities. We need effective public education so that people understand the hazards of open defecation,” Maboshe said.

He said Zambia risks not achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) No.6 which aims at reducing by half the number of people who don’t have access to basic sanitation if open defecation was not stopped.

“Millions of people are still using bushes to defecate because they do not have toilets. We need to sensitise people to build basic and affordable toilet structures if we are to achieve SDG number six and reduce diarrheal diseases,” he stressed.

Maboshe Rural Water Initiative (MRWI) triggers the community’s desire for change and propels them into action to develop local solutions to improve sanitation in their localities.

He said stories of indiscriminate disposal of human excreta or open defecation are rife in some of the rural and urban district areas of Western province in Zambia even in this time and age when technology has evolved. It is surprising to see people in this generation and century disposing of human excreta indiscriminately or open defecation not only in rural areas but also in urban areas.

But the question is it because of too much bare land in Western province or inadequate sanitation facilities, especially in the rural areas.

However, improved sanitation is important not only to human health but also for economic and social development. Yet sanitation in Zambia faces challenges linked to human behaviour and key on the list are lack of infrastructure, indiscriminate disposal of water waste, lack of control for collection and treatment of waste and open defecation.

The effects of open defecation are that it pollutes the ground water, agricultural produce and helps spread diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera and bilharzia.

Issued by Patrick Maboshe
Executive Director
Memorial Centre (MMC)
+260979997382
Website: - www.maboshememorialcentremmc.yolasite.com
Facebook page: - www.facebook.com/maboshememorialc
Twitter: - twitter.com/mmc_office

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