New book on resource recovery from waste by IWMI

  • arno
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New book on resource recovery from IMWI

Resource Recovery from Waste
Business Models for Energy, Nutrient and Water Reuse in Low- and Middle-income Countries

Edited by Miriam Otoo and Pay Drechsel

For details see: www.routledge.com/Resource-Recovery-from...p/book/9781138016552

Contents
Editors and authors xi
Acknowledgements xiii
Foreword by Guy Hutton xv

SECTION I: BUSINESS MODELS FOR A CIRCULAR ECONOMY: INTRODUCTION 1
1. Business models for a circular economy: Linking waste management and sanitation
with agriculture 3
Pay Drechsel, Miriam Otoo, Krishna C. Rao and Munir A. Hanjra

2. Defining and analyzing RRR business cases and models 16
Miriam Otoo, Solomie Gebrezgabher, Pay Drechsel, Krishna C. Rao, Sudarshana Fernando,
Surendra K. Pradhan, Munir A. Hanjra, Manzoor Qadir and Mirko Winkler

SECTION II: ENERGY RECOVERY FROM ORGANIC WASTE 33
Edited by Krishna C. Rao and Solomie Gebrezgabher
Recovering energy from waste: An overview of presented business cases and models 34

3. Business models for solid fuel production from waste 39
Introduction 40

Case – Briquettes from agro-waste (Kampala Jellitone Suppliers, Uganda) 41

Business model 1: Briquettes from agro-waste 51

Case – Briquettes from municipal solid waste (COOCEN, Kigali, Rwanda) 61

Case – Briquettes from agro-waste and municipal solid waste (Eco-Fuel Africa, Uganda) 72

Business Model 2: Briquettes from municipal solid waste 82

4. Business models for in-house biogas production for energy savings 91
Introduction 92

Case – Biogas from fecal sludge and kitchen waste at prisons 93

Case – Biogas from fecal sludge at community scale (Sulabh, India) 103

Case – Biogas from fecal sludge at Kibera communities at Nairobi (Umande Trust, Kenya) 114

Business model 3: Biogas from fecal sludge at community level 124

Case – Biogas from kitchen waste for internal consumption (Wipro Employees Canteen,
India) 133

Business model 4: Biogas from kitchen waste 142

5. Business models for sustainable and renewable power generation 149
Introduction 150

Case – Power from manure and agro-waste for rural electrification (Santa Rosillo, Peru) 152

Case – Power from swine manure for industry’s internal use (Sadia, Concordia, Brazil) 162

Case – Power from manure and slaughterhouse waste for industry’s internal use
(SuKarne, Mexico) 172

Business model 5: Power from manure 182

Case – Power from agro-waste for the grid (Greenko, Koppal, India) 193

Case – Power from rice husk for rural electrification (Bihar, India) 203

Business model 6: Power from agro-waste 215

Case – Power from municipal solid waste at Pune Municipal Corporation
(Pune, Maharashtra, India) 222

Business model 7: Power from municipal solid waste 232

Case – Combined heat and power from bagasse (Mumias Sugar Company, Mumias District,
Kenya) 238

Case – Power from slaughterhouse waste (Nyongara Slaughter House, Dagorretti, Kenya) 248

Case – Combined heat and power and ethanol from sugar industry waste (SSSSK,
Maharashtra, India) 257

Case – Combined heat and power from agro-industrial wastewater (TBEC, Bangkok,
Thailand) 268

Business model 8: Combined heat and power from agro-industrial waste for on- and
off-site use 278

6. Business models on emerging technologies/bio-fuel production from agro-waste 284
Introduction 285

Case – Bio-ethanol from cassava waste (ETAVEN, Carabobo, Venezuela) 286

Case – Organic binder from alcohol production (Eco Biosis S.A., Veracruz, Mexico) 296

Business model 9: Bio-ethanol and chemical products from agro and agro-industrial
waste 307

SECTION III: NUTRIENT AND ORGANIC MATTER RECOVERY 315
Edited by Miriam Otoo
Nutrient and organic matter recovery: An overview of presented business cases and models 316

7. Business models on partially subsidized composting at district level 321
Introduction 322

Case – Municipal solid waste composting for cost recovery (Mbale Compost Plant,
Uganda) 324

Case – Public-private partnership-based municipal solid waste composting
(Greenfields Crops, Sri Lanka) 333

Case – Fecal sludge and municipal solid waste composting for cost recovery
(Balangoda Compost Plant, Sri Lanka) 341

Business model 10: Partially subsidized composting at district level 351

8. Business models on subsidy-free community-based composting 359
Introduction 360

Case – Cooperative model for financially sustainable municipal solid waste composting
(NAWACOM, Kenya) 362

Business model 11: Subsidy-free community-based composting 371

9. Business models on large-scale composting for revenue generation 378
Introduction 379

Case – Inclusive, public-private partnership-based municipal solid waste composting for
profit (A2Z Infrastructure Limited, India) 381

Case – Municipal solid waste composting with carbon credits for profit (IL&FS, Okhla,
India) 391

Case – Partnership-driven municipal solid waste composting at scale (KCDC, India) 400

Case – Franchising approach to municipal solid waste composting for profit
(Terra Firma, India) 411

Case – Socially-driven municipal solid waste composting for profit (Waste Concern,
Bangladesh) 422

Business model 12: Large-scale composting for revenue generation 434

10. Business models on nutrient recovery from own agro-industrial waste 447
Introduction 448

Case – Agricultural waste to high quality compost (DuduTech, Kenya) 450

Case – Enriched compost production from sugar industry waste (PASIC, India) 459

Case – Livestock waste for compost production (ProBio/Viohache, Mexico) 468

Business model 13: Nutrient recovery from own agro-industrial waste 478

11. Business models on compost production for sustainable sanitation service delivery 484
Introduction 485

Case – Fecal sludge to nutrient-rich compost from public toilets (Rwanda Environment
Care, Rwanda) 487

Business model 14: Compost production for sustainable sanitation service delivery 496

12. Business models for outsourcing fecal sludge treatment to the farm 504
Introduction 505

Case – Fecal sludge for on-farm use (Bangalore Honey Suckers, India) 508

Business model 15: Outsourcing fecal sludge treatment to the farm 516

13. Business models on phosphorus recovery from excreta and wastewater 523
Introduction 524

Case – Urine and fecal matter collection for reuse (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso) 527

Business Model 16: Phosphorus recovery from wastewater at scale 538

SECTION IV: WASTEWATER FOR AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND AQUACULTURE 547
Edited by Pay Drechsel and Munir A. Hanjra

Wastewater for agriculture, forestry and aquaculture: An overview of presented
business cases and models 548

14. Business models on institutional and regulatory pathways to cost recovery 553
Introduction 554

Case – Wastewater for fruit and wood production (Egypt) 556

Case – Wastewater and biosolids for fruit trees (Tunisia) 569

Case – Suburban wastewater treatment designed for reuse and replication (Morocco) 584

Business model 17: Wastewater for greening the desert 595

15. Business models beyond cost recovery: Leapfrogging the value chain through
aquaculture 604
Introduction 605

Case – Wastewater for the production of fish feed (Bangladesh) 606

Case – A public-private partnership linking wastewater treatment and aquaculture (Ghana) 617

Business Model 18: Leapfrogging the value chain through aquaculture 631

16. Business models for cost sharing and risk minimization 639
Introduction 640

Case – Viability gap funding (As Samra, Jordan) 642

Business model 19: Enabling private sector investment in large scale wastewater
treatment 656

17. Business models on rural–urban water trading 664
Introduction 665

Case – Fixed wastewater-freshwater swap (Mashhad Plain, Iran) 670

Case – Flexible wastewater-freshwater swap (LIobregat delta, Spain) 679

Business model 20: Inter-sectoral water exchange 691

Case – Growing opportunities for Mexico City to tap into the Tula aquifer (Mexico) 698

Case – Revival of Amani Doddakere tank (Bangalore, India) 710

Business model 21: Cities as their own downstream user (Towards managed aquifer
recharge) 720

18. Business models for increasing safety in informal wastewater irrigation 728
Introduction 729

Business model 22: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as driver of change 733

Business model 23: Wastewater as a commodity driving change 745

Business model 24: Farmers’ innovation capacity as driver of change 760

SECTION V: ENABLING ENVIRONMENT AND FINANCING 775

19. The enabling environment and finance of resource recovery and reuse 777
Luca di Mario, Krishna C. Rao and Pay Drechsel

Frugal innovations for the circular economy: An epilogue 801
Jaideep Prabhu

Index 804

Arno Rosemarin PhD
Stockholm Environment Institute
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www.sei.org
www.ecosanres.org
Current project affiliation: www.susana.org/en/resources/projects/details/127
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  • Payd
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Re: Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

Dear Anna, *
Indirect wastewater use is probably 30 times more common (area-wise) as direct reuse but due to its nature still not well captured in stats, like FAO's Aquastat which might come closest. However, the extent has now been estimated (see iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa75d1/meta which is an open-access paper).

Dear Elisabeth, thanks for mentioning our new book. The last three cases in its water section are indeed on indirect wastewater use, which are usually situated in the informal reuse sector calling for innovative ways to enhance safety. We are discussing here, for example, a corporate social responsibility (CSR) model based on experiences from Africa.
This book by IWMI, EAWAG and CEWAS is on RRR business models ( www.routledge.com/9781138016552 ) looking at water, nutrient and energy recovery, mostly in the global South, and we would be happy if its arrival could also be made known in other SuSanA posts. For now, it is available as hardcopy and e-book (see link or flyer), but from early July 2018 on, we will be allowed to post a free pdf on our IWMI website to which SuSanA could link (I will post then an update). We are not yet sure if we will get permission to split the file as the whole book might be 120MB, difficult to download.
We can also post hardcopies or e-book codes from our own stock for free to lecturers running sanitation, waste or business curricula and who are interested in integrating the book in their teaching. We are working with CEWAS on the development of related modules to support such an uptake. With its nearly 50 case studies which led to the presentation of 24 business models, the book targets mostly civil engineering students interested in cost recovery and profit models, as well as business students interested in the waste and sanitation sectors.
Best regards,
Pay (IWMI)
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  • Payd
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Re: Areas of potential indirect reuse for developing countries.

The RRR business model book is now free online as pdf at www.iwmi.org/resource-recovery-from-waste

There is the whole 816 page book, but also each section for those with limited bandwidth.
We also have some free eBook codes if anyone is interested.
Best regards,
Pay
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