Sanitation Trial in Maputo, Mozambique (MAPSAN) - LSHTM and Georgia Tech

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Sanitation Trial in Maputo, Mozambique (MAPSAN) - LSHTM and Georgia Tech

I am starting this thread to provide more information about a project called:
Sanitation Trial in Maputo, Mozambique (MAPSAN) - Supporting the generation of new knowledge on the health impacts of urban sanitation

It is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Duration: 17 Nov 2015 to 1 April 2018

Purpose: to support the generation of new knowledge on the health impacts of urban sanitation (This investment covers a shortfall in the implementation costs for the sanitation intervention in Maputo, in order to preserve the validity of the embedded trial.)

Size of this phase of funding: USD 370,359 (see here: www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quic...s/2015/11/OPP1137224 )

Grantee: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine ( Oliver Cumming )

Collaborators: Georgia Institute of Technology ( Joe Brown ) - Study Principal Investigator - School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, brown.gatech.edu

Further information and links here in the SuSanA project database:
www.susana.org/en/resources/projects/details/284

I copy from there:

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We seek to answer two primary study questions:

Question 1: Can urban, onsite, shared sanitation reduce risk of enteric infections in children?

Question 2: Do enteric infection risks and the effects of urban sanitation vary by localised population density?

We are using exposure assessment, faecal source tracking, and microbial transmission modelling to examine whether and how routes of exposure for diarrhoeagenic pathogens and STHs change following introduction of effective sanitation.

Ethics Study protocols have been reviewed and approved by human subjects review boards at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the Ministry of Health, Republic of Mozambique.
Trial registration number NCT02362932

This project includes sanitation interventions in Maputo, in order to preserve the validity of the embedded trial.

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Today I received from Joe a recent presentation about this project, which you can view here:

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I believe the full report from this research is currently being prepared and reviewed.

I am sure Joe will be happy to answer any questions you have about the methodology and interim findings to date that can already be shared.

I have a question to Joe: is there a planned extension to this project? And what is the main conclusion that you have drawn from the research so far?

Regards,
Elisabeth

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
Independent consultant
Community manager of this forum via SEI
(see: www.susana.org/en/resources/projects/details/127 )
Wikipedian, co-founder of WikiProject Sanitation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Sanitation

Location: Frankfurt, Germany
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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  • muench
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Re: Sanitation Trial in Maputo, Mozambique (MAPSAN) - LSHTM and Georgia Tech

I received this update about the Sanitation Trial in Maputo, Mozambique (MAPSAN) by Joe Brown by e-mail:

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Hi Elizabeth

So far, we have only completed analysis for the baseline primary outcome data, and results are forthcoming. We have observed that, overall, enteric infection prevalence is quite high. In this cohort, asymptomatic infections of enteric pathogens (bacteria, protozoa only) increase with age from 71% (0-11 months) to 96% (24-48 months), while self-reported diarrhea decreases with age, from 26% (0-11 months) to 5.2% (24-48 months). Prevalence of coinfections is high. Soil-transmitted helminthiasis is over 40% in this pre-school-aged cohort.

Surveillance continues and has been extended to 24 months post-intervention, an extension of 12 months from the study as originally designed. We are about halfway through the 24-month follow-up at present.

Joe

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
Independent consultant
Community manager of this forum via SEI
(see: www.susana.org/en/resources/projects/details/127 )
Wikipedian, co-founder of WikiProject Sanitation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Sanitation

Location: Frankfurt, Germany
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Twitter: @EvMuench
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