SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:08:58 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: Wanting a better way to test pathogen inactivation? Us too! Can you help me crowdsource a better way? - by: BJimenezC http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2912-software-to-identify-and-quantify-pathogenic-helminth-eggs-university-universidad-nacional-autonoma-de-mexico-unam-mexico#9497 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2912-software-to-identify-and-quantify-pathogenic-helminth-eggs-university-universidad-nacional-autonoma-de-mexico-unam-mexico#9497
Blanca]]>
Enabling environment Fri, 25 Jul 2014 21:10:27 +0000
The Newsletter "Boues mag" N°3 of Program of Structuring of Fecal Sludge Market for the Benefit of poor households in Dakar, Sénégal (ONAS) - by: Onasbv http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9432 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9432
Thank you to find enclosed in English the magazine “Boues mag” number three (N°3) of Program of Structuring of Fecal Sludge Market for the Benefit of poor households in Dakar (PSMBV).
Good reception.

Cover page:



TABLE OF CONTENTS :

P. 03 Editorial

P. 04 News

P. 04 Reinvent the Toilet Fair the Promotion of Innovation

P. 06 Second Steering Committee of the PSMBV

P. 07 Innovative Sanitation Technologies in Flooded Areas: Two Prototypes Selected

P. 08 Submission of the first funding application files

P. 9 Project dynamic

P. 9 Ordering desludging services on the phone in Dakar, now a reality

P. 11 Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation (SEP) and Decision Making

P. 14 The WSA agency in the PSMBV project

P. 16 Panafrican Agency for Water and Sanitation in Africa (WSA)

P. 17 Innovation

P. 17 Sustainable access of the poor to adequate sanitation

P. 18 Innovative Sanitation Technologies (IST) in Dakar’s Suburbs: A real need for populations living in flood-prone areas

P. 19 Reduction of electricity costs: A New Approach to behavioral Change

P. 21 RANAS research technology

P.24 Adding value to sludge from wastewater or desludgings

P. 26 Dossier

P. 26 Collective sanitation and management of fecal sludge in Dakar

P. 33 Focus

P. 33 Innovative technology for the value addition to fecal sludge

P. 35 Interview

P. 35 Dr. Doulaye Koné, Project Manager at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation


Best regards,
Aissatou Basse]]>
Enabling environment Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:57:58 +0000
Re: Wanting a better way to test pathogen inactivation? Us too! Can you help me crowdsource a better way? - by: BJimenezC http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2912-software-to-identify-and-quantify-pathogenic-helminth-eggs-university-universidad-nacional-autonoma-de-mexico-unam-mexico#9351 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2912-software-to-identify-and-quantify-pathogenic-helminth-eggs-university-universidad-nacional-autonoma-de-mexico-unam-mexico#9351
Please find below more information about our UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) team project to identify and quantify pathogenic helminth eggs:


Title of grant:

Software to identify and quantify pathogenic helminth eggs

Subtitle: Software to automatically identify and quantify pathogenic helminth eggs in water, wastewater, biosolids and excreta.

Name of lead organization: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Primary contact at lead organization: Blanca Jiménez Cisneros, Ph.D.

( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

Grantee location: UNAM, Instituto de Ingeniería, Mexico City

Developing country where the research is being or will be tested:
Mexico, Colombia, some countries of Africa (as Namibia, South Africa, Kenya), Brazil, Philippines, India, as well as developed countries such as USA, Spain and Germany.


Short description of the project:

The following activities have been performed:

a) Integration of a library of helminth eggs images including eight different species, at three viability stages: viable eggs, non-viable eggs, and larval eggs.

b) Software development. Its functions involve detecting and labeling all visible objects in an image, using different processes (filtration, equalization, application of algorithms, etc.), and afterwards the classification of each detected objects based on shape (area, perimeter and eccentricity), and texture properties. The image library was needed to train the software on how a specific helminth egg would look like.

c) Software first validation. Comparative tests were conducted to determine the difference between software performance, and the results given by the standard identification and quantification technique performed by expert microbiologists. Most of the validation and software improvement have been done simultaneously.

The following activities are still ongoing:

a) To include additional helminth eggs species to the recognition protocol.
b) To finish the lab validation so all the objectives can be achieved.
c) To perform international peer-labs test and validation.
d) To develop a user friendly software that may be widely distributed.
e) To find a proper distribution channel that benefits target users (mostly) in developing countries.

Goal(s) Phase I:

To provide an image processing tool to reduce the cost and time consumed by the identifying and quantifying of helminth eggs.

Objectives (Phase I):

a) Setting a workstation: the first task to begin the project was to put a microscopic image processing workstation.

b) Generating helminth eggs image library: with the workstation ready, several helminth eggs images were acquired. The species used for this objective were selected, based on their medical importance and worldwide ubiquity.

c) Developing identification software: a comparative study of the available recognition protocols and image processing techniques was performed.

d) Increasing the number of involved species of helminth eggs: additional species of helminth eggs were selected regarding the difficulty level of identification and the widespread presence.

e) System improvement: New image processing tools and changes were applied to the software. At this point a series of filters were added for image processing.

f) System validation: The validation was made using wastewater samples of three different quality levels.


Goal(s) Phase II:

To distribute this tool worldwide, and ensure mainly that those regions that have limited resources to perform wastewater, sludge, biosolids and excreta quality assessments have easy access to this tool.


Objectives (Phase II)

a) To increase the sensibility of the identification system when dealing with high solids content water (class III or raw wastewater) and establish the protocol for this case.

b) To validate the software to detect and quantify different genera of helminth eggs from samples of different water qualities including wastewater and greywater, and also from sludge, biosolids and excreta samples.

c) To include additional helminth eggs species to the recognition protocol.

d) To validate the system with international partners.

e) To test the system with Mexican partner labs which are certified in the standard technique to start local distribution.

f) To obtain a patent for the system.

g) To launch a worldwide distribution strategy.

h) To develop an easy-to-use platform of the software and the distribution strategy to reach the final users.

i) To test the last version and establish the distribution strategy.


Start and end date:

Phase I: 02/01/2012 to 06/01/2013
Phase II: 02/01/2014 to 01/01/2016


• Grant type: The Grand Challenges Explorations Grant.

Phase I: USD 100,000 (www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quic...s/2011/10/OPP1044443)
Phase II: USD 354,284 (www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quic...s/2013/10/OPP1094904)

• Funding for this research currently ongoing (yes/no): Yes

• Research or implementation partners: Fernando Arámbula, Ph.D. CCADET, UNAM.

• Links, further readings – results to date:

a) So far, the system:

• is able to process images with a 99% of specificity, which means that it can distinguish between helminth eggs and other objects with a 99% of reliability.

• has also been validated to yield a 90% reliability to distinguish among five different helminth genera from water samples with a less than 150 mg/L of total suspended solids.

• is being tested and validated to be used for different samples (water, sludge, biosolids and excreta), so the protocol for each type of sample will be properly established, which gives the system a great versatility.

• is including additional species of helminth eggs species to the recognition protocol.

• is also aiming to take third party trials before the final version is delivered, and afterwards, to build the most suitable platform to develop a user friendly system, so we may focus on the distribution strategy.

• The patent is pending, but the methodology is already safeguarded.

• To develop an easy-to-use platform of the software and the distribution strategy to reach the final users.

• Current state of affairs: The developing team is in direct contact with international peer-labs interested on validating the software.

• Biggest successes so far: Platform ready to distinguish among eight genera of helminth eggs with 90% of reliability and 99% specificity for water samples.

• Main challenges/frustration: To broaden the software capability to analyze wastewater with higher content of total suspended solids, and develop the protocol for biosolids and excreta.


In the following paragraphs it is presented a short summary about the first results:

Software to identify and quantify pathogenic helminth eggs

The analytical technique used to identify and quantify helminth eggs, besides its time consuming nature, involves a key step in which highly trained laboratory technicians have to properly identified different types of eggs and count them. This step is the main source of errors impacting the reliability of the fulfillment of the norms or the performance of a treatment process. To overcome this problem, this project focused on the development of a software to identify and quantify different species of helminth eggs in samples.

Helminths (parasitic worms) are the origin of health risks associated with the lack of or a deficient sanitation service, the use of polluted water for irrigation, and the disposal of excreta or contaminated sludge in soils. Helminths are transmitted to humans through their eggs which are highly dangerous due to their low infectious dose, their high persistence in the environment, and their high resistance to inactivation processes. Helminthioses are endemic in Africa, Latin America and East Asia, provoking diarrhea, undernourishment, and anemia. It is estimated that around 350 million people are infected worldwide, especially children between 5 and 15 years of age.

For these reasons, since 1989, the WHO and since then many other organizations have set guidelines of standards limiting the content of helminth eggs in wastewater (1 egg/L or less), greywater, and sludge (1 egg/gTS or less) when used for agricultural irrigation. The limit values always involve the need to use a highly accurate analytical procedure. Nevertheless, it is always available, notably in developing countries, limiting the possibility to enforce the standards in the countries where it is more needed.

Given the above explained complexity to accurately analyze biological images to identify and count helminth eggs, it was decided to develop an image processing software in order to identify and count eggs from photographs taken on a microscope of a processed sample of wastewater, greywater, excreta or sludge. The developed software comprises two steps: the first is to detect and label all visible objects using different processes (filtration, equalization, application of algorithms, etc.). The second step is to classify each of the detected objects based on shape (area, perimeter and eccentricity) and texture properties (energy, mean gray level, contrast, correlation and homogeneity) as one the helminth eggs specie recognizable by the software.

Currently, the software is able to identify five species (Ascaris lumbricoides as fertile and unfertile, Trichuris trichiura, Toxocara canis and Taenia saginata) and in a next version three species more will be included (Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta and Schistosoma mansoni). In total, 360 images of the different species were used to set the range values for each classification property.

The software has 90% sensibility (ability to identify one specie among the others in a wastewater sample) and 0.99 specificity (potential to distinguish an egg from any other objects in a wastewater sample). Currently, the software is under adaptation to process excreta and sludge samples. Based on experimental tests the use of the software reduce the identification and quantification time response. This represents savings on the time of highly trained personnel per analysis. In addition, the reliability of the analysis increases by 90%.

More information about the pathogens inactivation is included in the next two files. The first is a paper about the synergy with different environmental conditions to inactivate helminth eggs in sludge samples, and the second one is a PDF presentation in the Disinfection World Congress (paper is in press) about the inactivation of different microorganisms.

Viability of six species of larval and non-larval helminth eggs for different conditions of temperature, pH and dryness
C. Maya, F.J. Torner-Morales, E.S. Lucario, E. Herna´ndez, B. Jime´nez*

Water Research 46 (2012), 4770 - 4782
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.06.014

A b s t r a c t
Helminth eggs are the most difficult biological parasites to inactivate in wastewater and
sludge. In developing countries, in particular, they are present in high concentrations and
are the cause of many diseases that impact seriously on the human population. The
process conditions for affordable inactivation are very variable, leading to different inactivation
efficiencies. Temperature, dryness, pH and the developmental stage of the eggs
must be taken into consideration to achieve complete inactivation. The objective of this
research was to study the inactivation of six species of larval and non-larval helminth eggs
of medical importance in developing countries under controlled conditions of temperature,
pH, dryness and contact time. Results showed considerable differences in inactivation
conditions among helminth eggs and a high level of resistance was confirmed for the eggs
of Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum. The appropriate conditions for inactivation of all
types of eggs were found by applying combinations of pH, temperature and dryness. At
45 C it was possible to inactivate all species with a pH of 5.3 and 90% dryness within 6
days. If alkalization was applied, a pH of 12.7 was sufficient over 19 days at the same
conditions of dryness and temperature. From these results it is proposed that both Ascaris
spp. and Taenia solium may be used as indicators of biological contamination in wastewater
and sludge.







Blanca]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:00:57 +0000
Re: Structuring of the fecal sludge market for the benefit of poor households in Dakar, Senegal (ONAS) - by: jonpar http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9349 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9349
I am working on a project design for a proposal to BMGF for Freetown and we are considering various mechanisms that may strengthen the lines of accountability between customers and service providers.

I am very interested to learn note about the call centre works that you refer. As well increasing competition and lowering prices for the customer, this may also help with monitoring and regulation. So, as you say, this is a novel idea that can have various benefits.

I would be very interested to hear more about how this is structured according to different customer groups

Is this the same for all types of customer? Are there service levels that are specified that the operator needs to adhere to/achieve?

Is this only for small businesses for trucks? Presumably, the operators have to be registered to receive the request for pit emptying - do they also need to be members of the association of pit emptiers?

I understand that the bargaining is based on one submission from the desludging company. What happens if the job turns out to be much more difficult than they expected due to local situation? The benefit of negotiation on the ground is that the desludger can assess more easily the scale/nature of the job and adjust the charge accordingly. If this is done remotely, then this is difficult. I suppose the desludger can visit the site, but I am not sure that this is realistic. So, there is possibility that the householder ends up paying more than they were quoted for, or the operator takes a loss or does the job poorly to cut costs.... what happens in this case ?

Look forward to hearing from you and learning more from your experiences.

best regards, Jonathan]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:18:14 +0000
Structuring of the fecal sludge market for the benefit of poor households in Dakar, Senegal (ONAS) - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9309 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#9309
Thanks for your detailed responses to my questions!

I think your case could be very interesting for the people following the other discussion thread on "treatment options for septage":
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/53-fae...treatment-of-septage

So in your case, you are using the "conventional" treatment of faecal sludge which consists of:

The three existing fecal sludge treatment plants (FSTP) in Dakar works well. Actually, they consist of a solid/liquid separation process contiguous to wastewater treatment plant. After this solid/liquid separation process via a settling/thickening tank, the solids are dried in drying beds and liquid (supernatant from settlers and leachate from beds) are sent by co-treatment with sewage to the wastewater treatment plant.

The dried sludge from beds are sold as fertilizer to gardeners.


I look forward to hearing more from you, when the results become available, regarding:
  • "We launched an international tender and more than 20 bids were received. They range from traditional dry toilet to toilet producing energy and without sludge. The selection is about to be made and detailed information will be shared later."
  • "A biogas production unit from fecal sludge is under construction at Keur Massar (suburb of Dakar)."
  • "The omni investor is always under development and will be tested in Dakar at the end of this year." (my explanation about the "omni-ingestor": it is a piece of equipment that is meant to treat faecal sludge at the point of the vacuum tanker so that clean water is left behind at the premises and only the more concentrated (thickened) sludge is removed in the vacuum tanker).

Also, it was nice to see that you and ONAS got a raving review from Brian Arbogast from the Gates Foundation in his latest blog post:

A Tale of Two Cities: Accra and Dakar

www.impatientoptimists.org/Posts/2014/06...ties-Accra-and-Dakar

(perhaps the people in Accra were less happy about this, but some health competition between two cities may be a good thing. )

Brian wrote:

The National Office for Sanitation in Senegal (ONAS) is a well-run organization populated by professionals who take their roles seriously. They have traditionally owned and operated all of the fecal sludge and waste-water treatment plants in the country. But last year, they privatized the operations of three fecal sludge treatment plants in Dakar, something rare in Africa.

The plants’ new operator is led by Mme. Faye Lena Tall, who owns vacuum trucks of her own. Since taking over the plants she has doubled the hours they are open and improved maintenance, while dramatically improving their profitability. Her agreement has her share her profits with ONAS, who now are happy making more money than they did when they had to run the plants!


Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
Enabling environment Fri, 11 Jul 2014 08:29:54 +0000
Re: Bringing Sanitation Innovations to Market (B-SIM) (WSUP, UK and Ghana, Zambia, Kenya, Bangladesh) - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/4000-bringing-sanitation-innovations-to-market-b-sim-wsup-uk-and-ghana-zambia-kenya-bangladesh#9018 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/4000-bringing-sanitation-innovations-to-market-b-sim-wsup-uk-and-ghana-zambia-kenya-bangladesh#9018
I was looking for projects in Bangladesh funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and I remembered your grant which you introduced here in this thread ("Bringing sanitation innovations to market" in Ghana, Zambia, Kenya and Bangladesh).
Could you please give us an update since your last post from a year ago? That would be great.

In particular, what has been your progress so far in Bangladesh (but also in the other three countries)?

I looked on your website but couldn't find specific reference to this project (sorry if I didn't look properly enough).
The link that you gave above is no longer working:
www.wsup.com/news/gatesgrant.htm

It would be great if you could update us on these questions which were too early last year:

Biggest successes so far: Too early to say.
Main challenges / frustration: Too early to say.
Links and further readings related to this project: www.wsup.com/news/gatesgrant.htm
To what extent have you achieved the goals already? None.
What have been enabling factors? Too early to say.
When can your technology be brought to scale and under which conditions? N/A
Where do you see its biggest niche or application area? N/A


Thanks in advance,
Elisabeth]]>
Enabling environment Sat, 21 Jun 2014 19:54:52 +0000
Re: Recording of presentation: Structuring of the fecal sludge market for the benefit of poor households in Dakar, Senegal (ONAS) - by: mbaye http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8824 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8824
Better late than never. Finally, I answer your questions.

(1)
Elisabeth wrote:
You said that the institutional set-up in Senegal is very clear, and that ONAS is well placed because it is responsible for everything to do with sanitation. On the other hand, up until now, it was not concerned with emptying of septic tanks and pit latrines, as that's done by the private sector. Isn't that a contradiction? Does that mean ONAS was only responsible for piped sanitation until now, and not for non-piped sanitation?


ONAS is responsible for sanitation in urban centers in Senegal, both public sanitation as individual sanitation. However, the intervention of the ONAS in the field of on-site sanitation was not as important as what is done in collective sanitation. This is the criticism that had been hitherto made to ​​ONAS. With this program, ONAS seeks to better structure the fecal sludge sectorand establish an enabling environment for a better access to mechanical emptying.

(2)
You said ONAS wants to phase out the manual pit emptying. Which technical solutions do you have in mind to make very thick sludge (bottom layers of pit latrines) pumpable? I can only think of dilution with water. Or converting pit latrines to pour-flush latrines maybe (to reduce the amount of solid waste), like it was proposed by Dave Still in a WRC report in South Africa.


It must be said that Dakar, septic tanks are the most represented; nearly 80% of the individual items listed. Under these conditions, the sludge are not as thickened sludge that latrines (as found in many African countries). However, sludge from latrines herein are not pumpable by existing trucks. For this sludge, people still rely on manual emptying. This is why, ONAS attaches particular importance to the Omni Ingestor Which will be able to mobilize this thickened sludge. This machine will be tested in Dakar by the end of 2014.

(3)
How well are the 3 faecal sludge treatment plants that are already operational actually working? Do you have photos? When were they built and by whom? Which processes do they use? Which effluent quality do they achieve on the liquid stream? What happens with the solid part (e.g. dried faecal sludge), what is done with that? Any reuse activities?


The three existing fecal sludge treatment plants (FSTP) in Dakar works well. Actually, they consist of a solid/liquid separation process contiguous to wastewater treatment plant. After this solid/liquid separation process via a settling/thickening tank, the solids are dried in drying beds and liquid (supernatant from settlers and leachate from beds) are sent by co-treatment with sewage to the wastewater treatment plant.

The dried sludge from beds are sold as fertilizer to gardeners.

These FSTP were built in 2004 with funding from the World Bank.

(4)
You mentioned 2-3 innovative toilet technologies suitable for areas that are prone to flooding. What technologies do you have in mind there? UDDTs perhaps (urine-diverting dry toilets)?


We launched an international tender and more than 20 bids were received. They range from traditional dry toilet to toilet producing energy and without sludge. The selection is about to be made and detailed information will be shared later.

(5)
I didn't understand how this call centre works that you mentioned? Does that mean residents can call up a call centre when they want their septic tank emptied and then get quoted the best possible price for their location?


A call-in center that households call whenever they need to have their septic tank emptied, is implemented. While this was an novel addition in and of itself, even more innovative is that every time a call comes in, 9-15 trucks (of ~70 in the system) are invited to participate in an immediate auction where the lowest price earns the opportunity to do the emptying!

Since this system has gone into place, the average emptying fee to the household has dropped over 15% (from $57 to $48) and the new convenience – households used to have to leave their homes to find and negotiate with an emptier, then often negotiate again at their home – has led to more emptying jobs, so the truck operators and truck owners are also happy.

(6)
Can you tell us more about the proposed biogas plant for faecal sludge treatment (you mentioned co-treatment with other organic waste). Is this entirely funded by the BMGF? Is it a full-scale plant? Why would they fund such a plant for you, what is their reasoning behind it? What is the connection here with China?


A biogas production unit from fecal sludge is under construction at Keur Massar (suburb of Dakar). This station is fully funded by the Gates Foundation. The objective is to make energy that once sold, can balance the operation of fecal sludge treatment plants (FSTP) or even make them profitable. Once FSTP profitable, it can participate to reduce the tipping fee and thus affect the cost of mechanical emptying. This station is sized by Beijing University, under contract with the Gates Foundation.

(7)
And finally a question about the Omni-ingestor: how far progressed is the development by now? Do you have any photos? Is there a prototype yet?
I read the report by the company Synapse (www.synapse.com/home-page?destination=node/427) (link to the report: susana.org/lang-en/library/library?view=...p;type=2&id=1718). The report is pretty interesting (thanks to the BMGF for commissioning the report and sharing it). This could be a big business if such an omni-ingestor could be developed. Mind you, I fear the maintenance issue could be a real headache since already the conventional vacuum tankers are not well maintained usually...


The omni investor is always under development and will be tested in Dakar at the end of this year.]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 02 Jun 2014 13:08:35 +0000
Re: Structuring of the fecal sludge market for the benefit of poor households in Dakar, Senegal (ONAS) - optimising faecal sludge emptying, transportation, processing - by: jmily http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8822 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8822
We are still waiting for your answer to Elisabeth: how will you deal with very thich sludge without manual emptying? Will the omnidigestor be able to deal with it (with a high pressure water injection system)?

More infos on the truck being developed by your project?

Hope to see you soon in Dakar and Mauritania,

JM]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 02 Jun 2014 11:52:59 +0000
Re: The Newsletter "Boues mag" of Program of Structuring of Fecal Sludge Market for the Benefit of poor households in Dakar, Sénégal (ONAS) - by: dorothee.spuhler http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8752 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8752 Regards Dorothee]]> Enabling environment Wed, 28 May 2014 07:49:51 +0000 Re: The Newsletter "Boues mag" of Program of Structuring of Fecal Sludge Market for the Benefit of poor households in Dakar, Sénégal (ONAS) - by: sahidul93 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8749 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8749 How to get the newsletter?

Thanks,
Sahidul
SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
Bangladesh]]>
Enabling environment Tue, 27 May 2014 22:33:39 +0000
The Newsletter "Boues mag" of Program of Structuring of Fecal Sludge Market for the Benefit of poor households in Dakar, Sénégal (ONAS) - by: Onasbv http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8747 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/5057-structuring-of-the-fecal-sludge-market-for-the-benefit-of-poor-households-in-dakar-senegal-onas-optimising-faecal-sludge-emptying-transportation-processing?limit=12&start=12#8747 Good reception.

Best regards,

Aissatou


Table of contents:

P. 03 Editorial
P. 04 News
P. 04 • Technical Committee of the PSMBV
P. 06 • The call center for pit emptying
P. 07 • Information and sharing with stakeholders at the municipality level
P. 09 Project dynamic
P. 09 • A guarantee fund for empties
P. 12 • Project for flood-prone areas in Pikine and Guédiawaye
P. 14 • Mechanical emptiers in Dakar : profile, work and services offered
P. 16 • Organizing the transportation of fecal sludge: A new approach in progress
P. 18 • Testing Platform for innovative sanitation technologies
P. 20 • Fecal Sludge: A Promising Market
P. 24 Innovation
P. 24 • After the PAQPUD ... towards an innovative and cost-effective management of fecal sludge
P. 28 Focus
P. 28 • Collection and transportation of sludge
P. 33 Interview
P. 33 • M. Ibra SOW, president of the Association of Senegalese Emptiers (AAAS)]]>
Enabling environment Tue, 27 May 2014 16:35:34 +0000
Re: Catalyzing Sanitation Businesses - Sanitation as a Business, SAAB (Water for People, Uganda, Rwanda, Malawi, India, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador) - by: smunyana http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#8041 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#8041
The link below is a video interview from the fair giving some insight into the work that SAAB is doing, what makes our solutions unique and some of the challenges faced.



The second link below is a tour of the exhibits (the Durasan and Rammer) that SAAB displayed together with PATH and PSI



The technologies displayed addressed different levels of the sanitation value chain, and the experience interacting with different BMGF grantees will no doubt help SAAB to continue making technological improvements that offer better sanitation solutions to households and communities. For more information on the technologies that Sanihub is working on please visit www.sanihub.blogspot.com


++++++++++++

A photo from the exhibit (added by EvM):

Parry’s Modular Latrine - Interlocking, pre-cast concrete components make assembly quick and simple by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 31 Mar 2014 07:59:20 +0000
Re: Learning experiences - by: smunyana http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#8038 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#8038 We would love to share our experiences. I have shared my contact information with you so please get in touch and I will be happy to point you to the right people in the respective countries.]]> Enabling environment Mon, 31 Mar 2014 07:15:36 +0000 Learning experiences - by: Ousmane66 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#7856 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/2897-catalyzing-sanitation-businesses-sanitation-as-a-business-saab-water-for-people-uganda-rwanda-malawi-india-bolivia-peru-ecuador?limit=12&start=24#7856 Water For People has led several experiences of project related to « Sanitation As A Business » in several countries around the world. OXFAM starts this experience in Senegal and wish to learn of what has been accomplished in the context of poor countries like ours even if it can appear some socio –cultural differences.
Facilitate the « doing business « between private sector enterprises and poor households on one hand by helping them have access to appropriate sanitation technologies with low cost and on the other hand helping enterprises earn money is a challenge which requires learning from similar experiences. This is the reason why we want to visit experiences of WFP in different countries. Unfortunately we do not have contacts or addresses of people we can exchange with.
So could you please provide us with complete address or contact of persons who have implement the SAAB RWANDA, India, Malawi and Peru so that we can prepare and discuss with the possibility of learning visit in those countries.
Thank you so much and any other experiences you think good in this subject will be welcome and don’t hesitate to share them with us.

Regards]]>
Enabling environment Mon, 17 Mar 2014 16:38:26 +0000
Re: Strengthening the Operation and Maintenance Sector for Servicing Decentralized Urban Sanitation Infrastructure in Karnataka, India (BORDA & CDD Society India) - by: MarenH http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/7073-strengthening-the-operation-and-maintenance-sector-for-servicing-decentralized-urban-sanitation-infrastructure-in-karnataka-india-borda-a-cdd-society-india#7552 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/97-enabling-environment/7073-strengthening-the-operation-and-maintenance-sector-for-servicing-decentralized-urban-sanitation-infrastructure-in-karnataka-india-borda-a-cdd-society-india#7552
my appologies for the late reply! The project is just starting so some of your question cannot be answert by now.
Please find below the team's reply to your questions:


Will you work with a couple of selected urban areas as pilots?

We will work in one city in India with aim of later reaching to larger context.

Since you will have a strong focus on O&M, I wonder if the infrastructural part of the sanitation system to a great extent already is in place, or will you have to invest heavily in infrastructure development as well initially?
No, we do not aim to invest in infrastructure, large number system already exist that need O&M

It would be nice to understand what will be your strategies and methods to mobilize the governments and key stakeholders?
We will update on this few month later

Will you be facilitating and supporting possible businesses opportunities for different functions along the sanitation value chain? Lastly, do you also aim at making the sanitation systems more sustainable from a resource point of view, e.g. through recycling of water and nutrients in agricultural production?
Yes, we aim to engage private sector in O&M value chain. The project will facilitate the process.

Best wishes,
Maren on behalf of Stanzin Tsephel]]>
Enabling environment Fri, 28 Feb 2014 09:38:53 +0000