SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Sat, 30 May 2015 14:29:40 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb USAID WASH and Nutrition Webinar - by: campbelldb http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/13488-usaid-wash-and-nutrition-webinar#13488 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/13488-usaid-wash-and-nutrition-webinar#13488
LINK TO WEBINAR]]>
Nutrition and WASH Thu, 28 May 2015 17:39:33 +0000
Re: WATSAN-AGRICULTURE: Improving on the Nexus among Water Quality and Quantity, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Agriculture - by: antonini http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13469 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13469
The hygiene awareness posters that were designed for the WASH intervention work in Bangladesh can now be viewed in the SuSanA Library.

The poster on food hygiene below was prepared by our PhD student Monirul Hasan. You can read his impressions and the experiences he made during his fieldwork below the poster! It would be great to receive your feedback and learn more about your impressions if you have designed similar posters for your interventions!

Best,
Samantha




What were your experiences for designing the poster? Do you have any advice on how to design a WASH poster (DOs/DON’Ts)?

It was exciting for me to design the poster. At first I was struggled with the messages of the poster that can support my intervention. Later on, designing the poster was challenging as the real photos of the items were not encouraged. Lastly, we planned to sketch those items. But difficult thing was to find the right person who can do it. I had contacted several persons who are good in fine arts and also professionally working as cartoonist. But most of them couldn’t show up with the final outcome because of their lack of interest and commitment. So working with poster became frustrating at that time. Later on I found one of them who fulfill this commitment and finally could submit the work. I was really pleased with her works and the quality of the poster.

Dos:
- Decide first what could be the messages regarding the intervention
- Make a preliminary idea or sketch to the artist or cartoonist.
- Make sure the characters in the poster can represent the context and localities of the intervention.
- Rightly place the messages in right order with proper illustration.
- Print the poster in a PVC paper so that after printing it can last for several months.

Don’ts:
- Don’t put lot of things in the poster. Make it as simple as possible.
- At first lot of things can come up, but be precise.
- Put enough space between messages, so that it can be understandable.
- Make it self-explaining.


What were your experiences in the field in terms of acceptance and understanding of the messages? Did people show interest or was the intervention work rather a nuisance for them as they had other things to do?

The poster was welcomed by the households. But they wanted more (such as refreshment, gifts etc.) along with the poster. Most people understood the character in the poster and the messages. The organization of the training session was challenging as some of the households failed to participate in the session as they had other works to do. Although making frequent request to attend, the participation rate in the session was close to 70%. But all households were given poster and also conveyed the messages by personally going to each households as some households couldn’t able to attend. So ensuring the maximum participation was the most challenging part of the intervention.
People showed interest about the poster because they mostly didn’t know those messages from the scientific point of view. They actually learned new things from the poster with scientific proof (they get the test of E.Coli result in their hand during the training sessions).


Do you have any preliminary results or observations at this stage?

The preliminary result still is not ready. But the feeling from the field work is that most households adopted some of the hygiene messages and also started investing in this hygiene related issues. Hand washing has been increased. Water handling is improved and many households started boiling water for drinking purpose. The count of E.Coli also reduced after the intervention.


What are your lessons learned/recommendations if you had to prepare another WASH poster in the future?

If I have to prepare another WASH poster in future, I would recommend to start working on the country perspective to know about the existing practices and then design the messages based on the cultural and context specific terms which can be used to draw cartoons self-explaining. Because at the end, the poster will remain in the households.]]>
Nutrition and WASH Thu, 28 May 2015 09:32:26 +0000
USAID webinar on WASH and nutrition (today, 26 May, 4 pm CEST Europe time) - Connection between undernutrition and lack of access to water, sanitation, hygiene services - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/13443-usaid-webinar-on-wash-and-nutrition-today-26-may-4-pm-cest-europe-time-connection-between-undernutrition-and-lack-of-access-to-water-sanitation-hygiene-services#13443 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/13443-usaid-webinar-on-wash-and-nutrition-today-26-may-4-pm-cest-europe-time-connection-between-undernutrition-and-lack-of-access-to-water-sanitation-hygiene-services#13443 today (at 4 pm CEST Central Europe Standard Time, e.g. Berlin), this could be an interesting webinar by USAID:

WASH and Nutrition
May 26, 2015 at 10:00 am Eastern Time (Washington, D.C.)/14:00 GMT

Overcoming undernutrition is a great challenge that will require both WASH and nutrition interventions. Elizabeth Jordan, from USAID’s Global Health Bureau, will discuss the connection between undernutrition and lack of access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services and highlight opportunities for integrated programming to achieve better health outcomes.


From this page: www.usaid.gov/what-we-do/water-and-sanit...ategy/webinar-series

Registration link: events-na3.adobeconnect.com/content/conn...&_charset_=utf-8

Might see some of you there...]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 26 May 2015 10:36:45 +0000
Re: Your feedback on hygiene promotion material for Sahel (Benefits of a household WASH package to Community Management of Acute Malnutrition in Chad) - by: WASHanna http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12594-your-feedback-on-hygiene-promotion-material-for-sahel-benefits-of-a-household-wash-package-to-community-management-of-acute-malnutrition-in-chad#13301 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12594-your-feedback-on-hygiene-promotion-material-for-sahel-benefits-of-a-household-wash-package-to-community-management-of-acute-malnutrition-in-chad#13301
Are you still looking for feedback on these materials? I think that you do a good job of addressing the key areas and I am particularly pleased to see the portion of the guide dedicated to safe child play spaces. I'm wondering if there is a way for you to incorporate larger emotional messages into the tools? Much of the guidance is around keeping the child healthy, which is certainly important, but I know that from the SuperAmma campaign, emotional drivers were more effective at changing hygiene behavior. I imagine you have already seen Om Prasad Gautam's work on food hygiene, but if not it might also be useful. If you'd like to discuss further please don't hesitate to reach out.

Best,

Hanna]]>
Nutrition and WASH Mon, 11 May 2015 20:06:04 +0000
Water quality information, WATSAN-agriculture hygiene messages and water testing with school students: Experimental evidence for behavioural changes - by: malekr25 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13293 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13293



Abstract


The economic literature has established that wealth is a key driver of the willingness-to-pay to protect oneself from environmental and health hazards. On the other hand, public health literature emphasizes the role of water, sanitation and hygiene information and knowledge to improve household behavior and achieve health outcomes. Knowledge and practices about contamination along the path from the drinking water source to use/consumption both in the households and farm fields is thus crucial to improve the health and developmental outcomes of farm households. How can the capacity of households and communities in monitoring their own water and sanitation environment be developed? How can water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) behaviour be improved? We start from the assumption that information can increase demand for environmental quality, improve water sanitation and hygiene behaviour, and thus improve health outcomes at the household level. We test the effectiveness of packages of WASH interventions with the school students in terms of their impacts on the water and sanitation (or WATSAN) behaviour of adult household members both in the households and in the farm fields and on health outcomes for the household members.

To that effect, we devise Randomized Control Trial (RCT) with secondary school students in 6 WATSAN hotspots (sub-districts) of Bangladesh, conducted in fourth phases. First, following a multi stage cluster random sampling, a sample of 648 faecal-contaminated households is drawn from a water quality census conducted by the trained staffs. Second, we conduct a baseline survey (i.e. pre-intervention), to establish the similarity of the treatment and control groups. The baseline survey also highlights the salient WATSAN and agricultural hygiene issues. Third, we implement the treatment, consisting of three actions: informing the households about the initial water testing results obtained from the earlier census, deliver hygiene messages through a poster related with farm field and households use, and equip the student brigades with water testing toolkits and let them test water at different points and communicate the results back to their households. Finally, we conduct the end-line survey along with the water quality testing by the trained staffs.

Baseline results confirm similarities for most of the outcome indicators among treatment and control groups. Also, the results reveal that on average only one third of our sample used sanitary latrine facilities, open defecation is still being practiced in the farm fields, more than 50% of the households on average were found to have wastes in their courtyard and it was observed that only half of our sample had soap at the hand washing station. Most of the sample households (about 80%) used soap or detergent to wash storage container. Although the entire sample seemed to drink water from improved water sources, very few treated water to make it safer to drink. Initial results from the ongoing treatment suggest that the suggested intervention packages can be an effective strategy to motivate households and communities in improving their WASH environment, particularly using school students as agents of change and as a channel of conveying messages across households and communities.]]>
Nutrition and WASH Mon, 11 May 2015 10:15:46 +0000
Re: Your feedback on hygiene promotion material for Sahel - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12594-your-feedback-on-hygiene-promotion-material-for-sahel-benefits-of-a-household-wash-package-to-community-management-of-acute-malnutrition-in-chad#13230 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12594-your-feedback-on-hygiene-promotion-material-for-sahel-benefits-of-a-household-wash-package-to-community-management-of-acute-malnutrition-in-chad#13230
I liked your post, thank you for informing us about this important projects which works across two (or even three) sectors - WASH and nutrition (and health).

You said:
The Action Contre la Faim is currently implementing operational research project called "Benefits of a household WASH package to Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM)" program in Kanem region in Chad


Could you tell us a bit more about the size and time frame of this research? I.e. from when to when, what budget do you have (roughly) and how large with the surveyed groups be?

What will be included in the “household WASH package”?

I am really interested in this topic, although I am still very much a novice. Recently I re-organised some content on Wikipedia and created a new page on "Malnutrition in children":
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malnutrition_in_children

If you have suggestions on further content for this article or other improvements, I would be keen to hear them.

I have been asking around for some additional photos for this article. I like those that show "everyday" malnutrition (rather than acute cases) and also would like to include some positive examples of how to overcome it.

This is the only photo in this article so far (I got it from the Philippines):

Malnutrition due to soil-transmitted helminthiasis (Philippines) by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr


Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
Nutrition and WASH Thu, 07 May 2015 09:05:22 +0000
Re: WATSAN-AGRICULTURE: Improving on the Nexus among Water Quality and Quantity, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Agriculture - by: antonini http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13209 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13209
Here's a link to the current issue of ZEF News which looks at water and environment in a mobile world.

On p.6 you'll find an article by Evita Pangaribowo which relates to our WATSAN-Agriculture project.

Regards,
Samantha]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 05 May 2015 11:21:33 +0000
Re: 8 practical ideas to link more WASH and Nutrition programmes - by: Annebauby http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#13040 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#13040
This pilot project in Chad in included into an integrated programme aiming at building Community Resilience to accute malnutrition involving four sectors of intervention - WASH, Health and Nut, livelihoods and DRR. We are trying to implement integrated activities in order to maximize the benefit of each one on child health and nutritional status. When we designed the ECOSAN pilot project, the idea was to create safe compost through this type of latrines to be spread on market gardening fields (parcelles de maraichage in french) to improve the soil fertility and therefore to improve the agricultural yields while the livelihood team would provide technical trainings on how to grow the vegetables. At the time of the harvest the Nutrition team would provide trainings to the mothers on how to prepare them for the children. But because we are just in the stage of spreading the dried excreta on fields, it is too early to say if this approach is working and if ECOSAN could be an interresting tool to improve nutritional status for children.

Also the second reason we designed this pilot project was to try to find an altermative latrine design to the CLTS latrines which are in the area. The CLTS latrines built by beneficiaries are poor quality and they tend to collapse during the rainy season. Therefore we wanted to know if we could promote ECOSAN to reach another step on the sanitation ladder and see if we could promote a more sustainable sanitation solution. But the cost of the latrine will prevent us from scaling up this project.....any idea to reduce their cost would be very useful.....maybe another pilot project aiming at testing different designs and materials.....

Anne-Laure]]>
Nutrition and WASH Thu, 23 Apr 2015 14:14:50 +0000
Re: WATSAN-AGRICULTURE: Improving on the Nexus among Water Quality and Quantity, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Agriculture - by: cyokyere http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13014 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13014
I present to you a current study being undertaken as part of my PhD Thesis at the Center for Development Research (ZEF) of the University of Bonn, Germany.

Brief Introduction

Mr. Charles Y. Okyere is currently a Doctoral (PhD) student at the Department of Economic and Technological Change, Center for Development Research (ZEF) of the University of Bonn, Germany. Mr. Charles Y. Okyere holds a Master of Philosophy degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Ghana and also worked with ISSER as a Research Assistant from February 2012 to September 2012. Mr. Charles Y. Okyere in 2007 graduated with second class upper division in Agriculture Technology (Agricultural Economics and Extension option) from the University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana. Mr. Charles Y. Okyere until now has worked for research organizations (including International Food Policy Research Institute, Food and Agriculture Organization, ACDI/VOCA, among others) on part-time basis since 2009. His interest areas include issues relating to child labour, natural disasters and hazards (especially flooding), water, sanitation and hygiene, rural development and agricultural budget process. He has skills in conducting socio-economic surveys (for instance, data collection and analysis) and has been involved in the collection of data in seven regions of Ghana on various development issues, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques.

He has fair idea on the use of socio-economic surveys and also a computer literate with good knowledge in computer programs such as SPSS, Excel, MS Word, Power point presentation, Eviews, STATA and Limdep for data management, data analysis and econometric modeling.

Working Title of Thesis
Water Quality in Multipurpose Water Systems, Sanitation, Hygiene and Health Outcomes in Ghana

Chapters of Thesis
1. Understanding the Interactions between Multipurpose Water Systems, Water and Sanitation, and Health Outcomes: Evidence from Rural Greater Accra Region of Ghana

2. The Impacts of Household Water Quality Testing and Information on Water Quality, Transport, Storage, and Treatment Behavior Changes: Evidence from an Experiment in Ghana

3. Household Water Quality Testing and Information: Identifying Impacts on Health Outcomes, and Sanitation and Hygiene Behavior Changes

Abstract of Thesis
About 1.8 billion of the world’s population consumes water from highly contaminated sources. Level of fecal contamination of water differs between point-of-source (POS) and point-of-use (POU). Providing water quality information to households is known to improve water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and reduction of diarrheal diseases. Studies in which water quality information is disseminated to randomly selected households potentially underestimate the impacts, missing the potential learning experiences from household self-water testing and also missing the most effective channels in the delivery of such information to the treatment groups. We conducted water testing experiments in southern Ghana (Greater Accra region) in which students in public basic schools, and adult household members were randomly assigned to receive water testing kits and water quality improvement messages. Selected participants were also trained on the use of water testing kits in testing for E. coli; an indicator bacteria of fecal contamination of water. Baseline orthogonality tests are used to check the similarities and differences between the intervention groups (clustered randomized design). Difference in difference (or comparison of means) estimators are analyzed by gender and type of participants (students vs adult household members). Robustness checks and sensitivity analysis are performed by testing for heterogeneity in treatment effects in order to limit false predictions/estimates. Short-run program effects are estimated for a wide range of outcome variables including water sources, diarrheal diseases, water transportation, and handling and storage techniques, among others.

Preliminary Results

Demand for water quality testing (measured by participation rate) was high for students’ intervention group compared to adult household members group. Participation rate (used to proxy demand) was slightly higher for females compared to males.

Potential Areas for Future Studies Based on Collected Data

1. Household Water Security, Water Quality and Water Demand in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

2. Household Demand for Improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Practices: Aspirations, Preferences, Expectations and Choices in Selected Communities in Greater Accra Region of Ghana

3. Assessment of Drinking Water Quality of Communities and Public Basic Schools in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

4. Modeling Household’s Decisions on Water Supply and Sanitation in Greater Accra Region of Ghana

5. A Study on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Practices among Selected Public Basic Schools in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:35:22 +0000
Re: WATSAN-AGRICULTURE: Improving on the Nexus among Water Quality and Quantity, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Agriculture - by: antonini http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13003 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#13003
Today I would like to introduce Charles Yaw Okyere from Ghana. Charles is doing his PhD research under the scope of the WATSAN Agriculture project. He looks at water quality in multipurpose water systems, sanitation, hygiene and health outcomes in Ghana.

The case study in Ghana looks at improving the capacity of communities in monitoring their WATSAN Agriculture environment. Randomized control trials focusing on informational interventions on water, sanitation and hygiene behavior were implemented in 2014. Randomly selected school children and adult household members were provided with water testing toolkits to test their stored drinking water for the presence of fecal bacteria. The experiment design will allow to assess the most effective channel for WATSAN information delivery.

Charles is currently undertaking the final stage of his field work and will hopefully be able to share first results soon!

Here is a short abstract of his research:

About 1.8 billion of the world’s population consumes water from highly contaminated sources. Level of fecal contamination of water differs between point-of-source (POS) and point-of-use (POU). Providing water quality information to households is known to improve water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and reduction of diarrheal diseases. Studies in which water quality information is disseminated to randomly selected households potentially underestimate the impacts, missing the potential learning experiences from household self-water testing and also missing the most effective channels in the delivery of such information to the treatment groups. We conducted water testing experiments in southern Ghana (Greater Accra region) in which students in public basic schools, and adult household members were randomly assigned to receive water testing kits and water quality improvement messages. Selected participants were also trained on the use of water testing kits in testing for E. coli; an indicator bacteria of fecal contamination of water. Baseline orthogonality tests are used to check the similarities and differences between the intervention groups (clustered randomized design). Difference in difference (or comparison of means) estimators are analyzed by gender and type of participants (students vs adult household members). Robustness checks and sensitivity analysis are performed by testing for heterogeneity in treatment effects in order to limit false predictions/estimates. Short-run program effects are estimated for a wide range of outcome variables including water sources, diarrheal diseases, water transportation, and handling and storage techniques, among others. Demand for water testing (measured by participation rate) was high for students’ intervention group compared to adult household members group. Participation rate (used to proxy demand) was slightly higher for females compared to males.]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 21 Apr 2015 08:34:31 +0000
Re: 8 practical ideas to link more WASH and Nutrition programmes - by: exobarbiche http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12931 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12931
Thanks for sharing this info. So far we have not "dared" to start ecosan in Tchad, fearing some resistance from population, but apparently that's possible, great! The experience we have with ecosan in sahel is mixed, in general people do use the built latrine, and sometimes also use the product for agriculture, but it seems that ecosan latrine are more expensive and difficult to make than traditional latrines, so since our strategy is to maximizing the latrine coverage to see clear effect on health and nutrition (which involve people making and financing their own latrine without subsidies) built ecosan latrine can be counter-productive...We also found that ecosan more relevant in urban or peri urban area, where empting and disposal of latrine is an issue (this operation tend to be easier with ecosan) than rural area, where they have a lot of space, and also a lot of other organic matter than human feces (such as straw, or animal feaces) if they want to produce organic fertilizer or compost. this being said, ecosan latrine have a lot of advantages, including environmental benefit, reduce smell etc...so we should try a way to reduce their cost!

Best]]>
Nutrition and WASH Thu, 16 Apr 2015 13:39:12 +0000
Re: WATSAN-AGRICULTURE: Improving on the Nexus among Water Quality and Quantity, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Agriculture - by: antonini http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#12907 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12540-watsan-agriculture-improving-on-the-nexus-among-water-quality-and-quantity-sanitation-hygiene-and-agriculture#12907
Let me introduce Ruchi Vangani to you: Ruchi is a Public Health expert and doing her research in collaboration with the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI).

Ruchi is looking at irrigation agriculture in the peri-urban areas of Ahmedabad with particular focus on water quality, health impacts (diarrhea prevalence, waterborne illnesses, parasitic prevalence), nutrition impacts and hygiene behavior.

She also examines the economic tradeoffs between enhancing health outcomes through 1) facilitating behavioral change by providing information to communities (e.g. about infectious pathways), versus 2) changing WATSAN-infrastructure services (e.g. for improved drinking water and sanitation), versus 3) (re-) design of multi-use water systems, or all of the three above.

The detailed abstract of her research is presented in her post above!

Best,
Samantha]]>
Nutrition and WASH Wed, 15 Apr 2015 12:27:26 +0000
Stockholm World Water Week 2015 - WASH in Nut seminar - by: JovanaD http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12902-stockholm-world-water-week-2015-wash-in-nut-seminar#12902 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/12902-stockholm-world-water-week-2015-wash-in-nut-seminar#12902
I would like to share with you the information on the event that ACF and partners are organizing during the Stockholm World Water Week 2015. The event will take place on Tuesday, 25th of August from 11:00 to 12:30. If anyone of you happens to be there and is interested in joining, please check the further information about the seminar below:


Wash In Nut – Review of strategy and operational solutions to fight undernutrition with Water, Sanitation and Hygiene


Event Description:

The publishing of a number of scientific reviews questioning the impacts of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) activities on nutritional status of individuals, has encouraged different academic, development and humanitarian actors to take a closer look at the connection and dependence of these two sectors. Based on the recent research and operational initiatives taken by various organizations and scientific institutions, this event aims at providing an overview of the latest field experiences and research projects linking poor WASH status, infection and under-nutrition as well as boosting the advocacy efforts determined to increase global knowledge and awareness about this issue. Among others, the SuSanA Working Group on WASH and Nutrition will present the current version of its Factsheet together with ongoing and future activities. The Sahel “WASH in Nut” strategy, developed by different organisations with the primary goal to increase the efficiency of humanitarian response to continuing nutritional crisis in this region, will also be presented along with the operational field experiences such as the ACF project in Burkina Faso. SHARE and LSHTM will present research that strengthens the evidence base on the impact of WASH on nutritional status and interventions to tackle this. Finally, the event will advocate for more rigorous research, policy coherence and stronger cooperation among Health and Nutrition, WASH, Mental Health, Care Practices and Food Security sectors in order to ensure that WASH aspects are acknowledged and implemented as an integral part of nutrition interventions.

Event Classification
Policy and Governance

Lead convenors

• Action contre la faim (ACF)
• German WASH Network

Co-Convenors
• Sustainable Sanitation Alliance
• Sanitation and Hygiene Applied Research for Equity (SHARE) Research Consortium
• LSHTM
• Concern Worldwide
• BMZ (Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development)
• GIZ
• ECHO
• UNICEF

Event objectives and expected outcomes:


The main objectives:
• to advocate for a multi-sector to fight under-nutrition;
• to call for incorporation of WASH components, including WASH targets and indicators, into the activities focusing on prevention and treatment of under-nutrition in order to improve their efficiency;
• to advocate for funding of WASH sector in accordance with its impacts on under-nutrition.

Expected outcomes:

• Latest evidences showing links between WASH and nutritional status are presented and discussed;
• Existing WASH in Nutrition operational approaches and tools reviewed and the best practices showcased;
• Wasting and stunting characterized and WASH approaches adapted accordingly;
• Place and role of WASH components within nutrition sensitive interventions presented and discussed;
• The panel of experts consolidated and networking efforts among academic, humanitarian, public and private actors in this field strengthened.

Key messages:

1. Ongoing research efforts are key in determining the impact of WASH interventions on nutritional status, especially acute malnutirion;
2. The WASH sector is an integral component of national and international strategies for combating under-nutrition;
3. More rigorous research, policy coherence and stronger cooperation between Health and Nutrition, WASH, Mental Health, Care Practices and Food Security sectors are needed;
4. Funding efforts need to correspond more closely to the Target 7.C. of the Millennium Development Goals, particularly on sanitation and hygiene, which is currently far from being attained;
5. It is essential for strategies and programmes aiming at fighting under-nutrition to incorporate short and long-term multi-sector components including WASH targets and indicators.


Event summary :


The event is planned to be a combination of plenary sessions, with the time devoted for questions and answers, and a group work to share best practices. Furthermore, the event will provide an opportunity for the conveners and the participants to share materials such as case studies, strategic documents, posters and advocacy material.

Target audience:

Government and policy makers, civil society representatives and NOGs, donors, academics, researchers and practitioners with an interest in the fight against under-nutrition, seeking information exchange/sharing on the impact of WASH interventions on nutritional status.

If you need any additional information about this event please feel free to get back to me.]]>
Nutrition and WASH Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:01:08 +0000
Re: 8 practical ideas to link more WASH and Nutrition programmes - by: WASHanna http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12879 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12879
I'm curious about the nutrition outcomes you are seeking since you mention agriculture yield. Could you share more on this aspect?

Thanks!]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 14 Apr 2015 09:29:08 +0000
Re: 8 practical ideas to link more WASH and Nutrition programmes - by: Annebauby http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12878 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/10392-8-practical-ideas-to-link-more-wash-and-nutrition-programmes?limit=12&start=12#12878
I am the Programme Manager that Franck mentionned in a previous post currently working in Chad. We are running a pilot project on ECOSAN latrines since November 2013. This is a very small scale project of 15 individual UDDT latrines builtd in 5 villages. Although the project is still on-going,we can list some lessont learnt so far.

* There is no particular taboos raised by this project until now, which is found as very surprising. We are in a muslim and semi-pastoralist area, which is not the best area to pilot such project. Religious and cultural taboos as well as issues related to beneficiairies leaving home for several weeks or months were expected at the begining of the project. However, they did not occur. We selected 3 volunteer families per village and one Imam was a volunteer.
* Latrines are highly accepted by the communities, not only by the volunteer families. The latrines were designed for being used by a households composed of in average 5 members and for a year. The vaults got full much faster because in some case more than 20 people have access to them. According to the result of our monitoring, the latrine did not raised any particular issue in the communities and everyone would be willing to use them (except from ederly who has difficulties to climb the steps).
* We focused a lot on sentitization, software activities and beneficiairies participation at all the stage of the project. They choose the design of the latrines to be built (we proposed UDDT, composting latrines, arboloo......)and for instance they participated in the construction. This factor is seen as reason for the success of the acceptance and the strong community leadership on the facilities.
* the beneficiairies are actually spreading the dry excreta on the fields or waiting for the rainy season to do so. Therefore we cannot know, the real success on agriculture yield yet. Therefore it is really too early to link this project with Nutrition outputs, which is the topic of this conversation!
* lastly, the design of the latrines is a bit poor. We did not have an engineer in the team when we designed the project and therefore we made some mistakes in the technical design (slabs a bit too small and steps too high) but they are not preventing users to actually use them. Also, even if we tried to reduce the construction cost...... the unit cost is about 300€/latrine which is a hight amount for a household latrine. We probably won't scale up this project for financial reasons.

I am happy to answer to any question!

Anne-Laure]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 14 Apr 2015 09:22:05 +0000