Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi (new publication by EAWAG)
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Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi (new publication by EAWAG) 07 Jul 2014 09:56 #9252

  • moslerha
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Dear all,

We recently published a paper in the IWA Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development based on our work in rural Burundi. I would like to bring this to your attention on this forum as I think it is very relevant for the category on “behavior change” here on the forum.

If you have comments or questions about the work described in this paper, please feel free to post them here and we will answer you here on the Forum.

You can download the paper from our website:
www.eawag.ch/forschung/ess/gruppen/ehpsy/publications/index_EN

Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi

Ina L. Sonego and Hans-Joachim Mosler
Environmental Social Sciences, EAWAG, Switzerland

ABSTRACT

Access to improved sanitation is fundamental for the prevention of diarrhoea and other diseases. However, for a sanitation facility to be safe, its cleanliness must be assured. The aim of the present study was, first, to assess how cleaning behaviour, household characteristics and infrastructural factors influenced latrine cleanliness and, second, to assess which psychological factors influenced cleaning behaviour. In a study in rural Burundi, 762 standardised household interviews with the primary household caregiver were carried out to assess habitual cleaning behaviour and psychological factors according to behaviour change models.

In addition, the characteristics and cleanliness of the latrine were observed, and two multiple linear regressions were performed to analyse predictors of latrine cleanliness and of cleaning behaviour. Latrine cleanliness was determined by cleaning behaviour, the possibility of locking the door, the height of the superstructure, the material of the superstructure and the availability of an even slab. The number of households or people sharing the latrine was not influential. Commitment to cleaning, satisfaction with the cleanliness of the latrine and self-efficacy determined habitual cleaning behaviour. Interventions focussing on commitment, self-efficacy and satisfaction with a clean latrine like public commitment or guided practice interventions are recommended to promote cleaning behaviour.

Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development Vol 4 No 2 pp 257–267 © IWA Publishing 2014 doi:10.2166/washdev.2014.147


Regards,
Hans-Joachim


Prof. Dr. phil. et dipl. zool.
Hans-Joachim Mosler
Eawag, Environmental Social Sciences
Environmental and Health Psychology
Überlandstrasse 133
CH-8600 Dübendorf / Switzerland
www.eawag.ch/forschung/ess/gruppen/ehpsy/index_EN
Last Edit: 07 Jul 2014 08:25 by muench.

Re: Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi (new publication by EAWAG) 11 Jul 2014 09:45 #9310

  • JKMakowka
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Sep 2013
Interesting study, however given the very rural nature of the sample, to quote:
All latrines were pit latrines; most were rudimentarily covered with wooden sticks and soil (75.1%); some had cement slabs (12.0%), others had wooden slabs (8.4%), and some were simply open pits (2.7%).

I am a bit sceptical regarding the applicability of results to more common settings in (peri-) urban areas. As recently shown here in Kampala, the number of households sharing a latrine seems to have a significant impact of perceived and actual cleanliness of them under such conditions.
Krischan Makowka
Technical Adviser at the Uganda Water and Sanitation NGO Network (UWASNET)
www.uwasnet.org
Last Edit: 11 Jul 2014 09:47 by JKMakowka.

Re: Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi (new publication by EAWAG) 11 Jul 2014 09:52 #9311

  • joeturner
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  • I am a shit philosopher, thinking about how we think about sanitation. I think our main paradigms in WASH may be wrong.
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Not sure if you are referring to this research, Krischan:

Kwiringira, Japheth, Peter Atekyereza, Charles Niwagaba, and Isabel Günther. "Descending the sanitation ladder in urban Uganda: evidence from Kampala Slums." BMC public health 14, no. 1 (2014): 624.

www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/624

Lots of very provocative things in both of these bits of research.
I don't work for anyone, I am a philosopher interested to think about how we think about WASH and sanitation. All thoughts are mine alone, I am responsible for any errors.

Previously trained and worked as a Soil Scientist and worked on projects composting sewage sludge.

Re: Why are some latrines cleaner than others? Determining the factors of habitual cleaning behaviour and latrine cleanliness in rural Burundi (new publication by EAWAG) 11 Jul 2014 10:59 #9313

  • JKMakowka
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Sep 2013
Yes that one and the others already linked in the 2014 EAWAG publications section by Hans-Joachim above (the three from Tumwebaze et al.).
Krischan Makowka
Technical Adviser at the Uganda Water and Sanitation NGO Network (UWASNET)
www.uwasnet.org
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