SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Sun, 21 Dec 2014 03:18:10 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: Introducing x-runner mobile system - by: denniskl http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4320-introducing-x-runner-mobile-system-piloting-in-lima-peru?limit=12&start=24#11292 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4320-introducing-x-runner-mobile-system-piloting-in-lima-peru?limit=12&start=24#11292
is there an update on your toilet rollouts on SuSana somewhere other than this thread?

Would be keen to see what numbers you reached (and are planning on reaching) and whether you found any better alternative to the fibreglass option?

I see a lot of pilots with 20, 30 or 50 toilets, but very few with numbers in the thousands - is that a function of funding or models (and scalability?)]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Sun, 07 Dec 2014 09:01:02 +0000
Re: Improve hygiene and sanitation by installing free mobile toilets in urban slam areas of Kampala district. - by: denniskl http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/6320-improve-hygiene-and-sanitation-by-installing-free-mobile-toilets-in-urban-slum-areas-of-kampala-district-public-toilets#11289 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/6320-improve-hygiene-and-sanitation-by-installing-free-mobile-toilets-in-urban-slum-areas-of-kampala-district-public-toilets#11289
If sanitation is "sold" as a valuable service, people will pay (as they do for their air time)]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Sun, 07 Dec 2014 06:17:55 +0000
Re: New Photos from SOIL's work in Haiti (social business model with mobile UDDTs, composting and reuse) - by: SOILHaiti http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#11283 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#11283
The toilet models SOIL uses continue to evolve in an iterative process that incorporates consideration of user feedback, maintenance needs, and cost at every point. The EkoLakay toilet model that we’re currently using costs us less than $50 USD to construct (built by local contractors out of locally available materials) and has received high reviews for appearance, ease of use, and ease of maintenance. Ultimately as an organization we’re agnostic about the design as long as it’s low cost, beautiful (aspirational), and user approved.

An inside look at one of SOIL's popular wooden toilet models:
A side view of a SOIL EcoSan toilet. The bucket collects solid wastes and the container on the left collects urine from the urine diversion funnel. by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Fri, 05 Dec 2014 19:07:58 +0000
New Photos from SOIL's work in Haiti (social business model with mobile UDDTs, composting and reuse) - by: SOILHaiti http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#11259 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#11259 www.flickr.com/photos/gtzecosan/sets/72157649095544877/ or check the samples below. Learn more about SOIL's work at www.oursoil.org and on social media @SOILHaiti.

Thanks for your support!
Leah, SOIL Development Director, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New SOIL EkoLakay toilets are being built every day by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr

A SOIL EkoLakay customer in her home by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr

A SOIL EkoMobil toilet by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr

The SOIL Poopmobile collecting drums of waste from SOIL toilets throughout Port-au-Prince Haiti Photo credit: Ricardo Venegas by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr

Compost for sale! Photo credit: Vic Hinterlang by Sustainable sanitation, on Flickr

See the full album at www.flickr.com/photos/gtzecosan/sets/72157649095544877/]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Thu, 04 Dec 2014 15:43:13 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums - by: stilmans http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#11224 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#11224
At Elisabeth's suggestion, I wanted to provide a brief update on what we at re.source are working on.

We have some more funding including from the U.S. EPA, and continue to help advise SOIL and others on household container-based sanitation. We initially did more work on our toilet design, aiming for a mass producible design. We have since concluded that between MoSan and xrunner's latest partnership with separett, there is enough effort on this aspect and we are more focused on software, logistics, and the business model.

We also are excited about locally-produced toilets. The models that SOIL continues to develop after our joint pilot are great. The wooden models are vulnerable exposure to moisture and urine, but this can be worked around. In the original units we deployed, we had a liner on the inside from recycled plastic tarp to protect the toilet from urine. SOIL's ferrocement model of course is less prone to this challenge, but is also less portable. Ultimately, we are very excited that SOIL and others groups including Sanivation are diversifying the range of dry toilet models available to users.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 02 Dec 2014 22:23:36 +0000
Re: Piloting mobile sanitation with full service provision (MoSan, now in Kenya) - by: MichaelCarr http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4710-piloting-mobile-sanitation-with-full-service-provision-mosan-now-in-kenya?limit=12&start=12#11187 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4710-piloting-mobile-sanitation-with-full-service-provision-mosan-now-in-kenya?limit=12&start=12#11187 REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING MASS PRODUCING A TOILET IN PLASTIC

Hi Mona:
I have designed a new type of UDDT – and created a prototype in fibreglass. It is a simple design with no mechanical parts except for toilet seat hinges. I posted it
in workgroup 4 and had some very positive replies, with potential for field trials
in India and full production. My plan is to go into full production worldwide to
meet global demand. My plan is to sell production rights under license, after field trials.

I would like to find out the following and wonder if you could help me?

•The price for each separate part for production – and the total cost for finished product ie; one UDDT complete
• The tooling up costs for each part. Can you do the tooling up?
• How long it would take to tool up & would you require me to do the autoCAD
• Which type of plastic to be used for a quality product (recycled if possible)
• Outputs – how many could be produced in a day on one machine (or set of machines)
NOTE: a very smooth surface would be preferred for the part with the urinal.

Would you be willing or able to manufacture this product in plastic? I was initially planning to do 100 units for field trials in fibreglass (here in Cambodia) but if you can do it that would also be great. You would just need to give me a price for 100.

I am currently writing up a business plan for an NGO in India and hope to start field trials in the first quarter of 2015

Please find attached a pdf photofile and details of Prototype 1 in fibreglass
I have also attached the proposal I've been sending out to NGO's as it has a lot of data in it.
PS: I can get the hinges made here in Cambodia.
PPS: congratulations on your own MoSan - I know how challenging it is to get that far : )

Thank you
Best regards
G A ‘ Mike’ Carmichael
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
eco1solutions.com]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Sat, 29 Nov 2014 09:02:37 +0000
World Water Week Forum on Resource Recovery through Social Business Models (experiences from SOIL in Haiti) - by: SOILHaiti http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#10975 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/11259-new-photos-from-soils-work-in-haiti-social-business-model-with-mobile-uddts-composting-and-reuse#10975 www.oursoil.org/soil-at-world-water-week/

It’s no secret that here at SOIL, we love poop and its resource potential. The creation of compost, and the revenue it generates, is an essential component of EkoLakay, SOIL’s household toilet social business pilot.

Fortunately, we’re not alone in our appreciation. This year’s World Water Week, one of the world’s largest events focused on water, sustainability, and development, featured a session on “Sanitation Business Models for Safe Resource Recovery and Reuse.” SOIL was honored to be among the presenters in this jam-packed session about current research and practices in the efforts to transform human waste into something safe, useful, and profitable.

SOIL, represented by acting Operations Director Nick Preneta, was one of five sanitation social businesses from around the globe that presented during the session. Nick gave an overview of the EkoLakay service, and the lessons SOIL has learned from the early stages of our pilot.

There were several interesting conclusions from the session. First, it recognizes the numerous challenges in creating self-sustaining social businesses in sanitation. No one has yet been able to create a full cycle sanitation system that is completely self-sustaining without waste treatment subsidies (for example, from the government), so we should celebrate making any part of the cycle profitable and keep working towards complete sustainability. It also emphasizes the need to invest in business and management training, as it is difficult to attract highly-skilled business people to a low-margin sector like sanitation. Finally, it highlights the importance of the ongoing work of SOIL and other practitioners in field-testing solutions and understanding – or creating – a market for end-products like compost.

Visit this link for video of the presentation.

See the presentation file here:]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Thu, 13 Nov 2014 17:32:03 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: kcrussel http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9463 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9463 It is always exciting to see threads that have been dormant still being useful. I’ll try and address each of the questions and comments in the order in which they were posted.

Cecília:
…mentioned that you were considering other treatment technologies and back-end products besides composting, such as the DEWATS and biogas. I am wondering how your research evolved in this regard. Would that be technically feasible considering that you are adopting UDDTs? I suppose you are using sawdust or some other dry material, wouldn't that interfere in other treatment processes?

Yes, you are correct we do not see the household cartridge-based toilet as strictly married to composting and the household toilets are urine diverting (I will use the acronym CBS for Cartridge-Based Sanitation). It really depends on the context in which the service and toilets will be used as to the most appropriate back end processing. In Haiti it made sense to use composting because, SOIL has done such a fantastic job of exploring and creating composting facilities. They have also spent a long time nurturing and investigating the market for finished compost in Haiti. There is evidence that compost markets appear to be rather robust in other locations including Africa and Latin America.

However, in many contexts that may not be the case and it could be far less technically feasible to use composting. In those cases there are other technologies, which are being developed that could be slotted in and replace composting as the treatment methodology. The key is which technology is most appropriate for the situation and how will it impact the service.

1.) Waste Enterprisers in Mombasa, Kenya are doing some very innovative work with fecal sludge where they turn it into biofuel pellets that can be used in industrial processes in Europe. The waste coming from our system would be especially welcomed as it has much lower moisture content.
2.) The Climate Foundation is doing some really cool work with biochar. They are currently testing shipping container sized biochar units with Sanergy in Nairobi Kenya. The waste that Sanergy in collecting is very similar to the waste that SOIL is collecting in Haiti.
3.) Loowatt is doing some very interesting work with biogas and container based toilets in Madagascar. However, they are also using a proprietary bio-plastic film to seal the waste for transport. If you were considering biogas, the cover material choice would be very important and need to be considered carefully. Most Anaerobic digesters need a higher moisture content than what our waste has, and woody substrates tend to be harder to digest. Different digester technologies like high-solids anaerobic digestion could still be interesting. The choice of cover material is also important for composting (in Haiti, SOIL is using sieved sugar cane bagas and crushed peanut shells).
4.) Black Soldier Fly is something that SOIL has looked into in Haiti but as Steve Sugden noted they seem to really prefer other forms of organic waste, which was also true in Haiti. This is not to say that it can’t be done however it will have a much steeper learning curve.

Disposal is a key component but one that several teams are working on. CBS can work with multiple types of back end treatment which increases flexibility. The key is to find the disposal and treatment method that fits the location.

Cost of unit production - seems to be recurrent issue and I wonder if the wooden / concrete versions have the same appeal. We really need to agree on one design and then approach a single supplier and encourage them to invest in a mold. They usually talk in selling 10s of 1000 of units to enable them to recover their mold costs, so even if we got together, it would be a hard sell. Tim at Envirosan in South Africa may be interested and the may even have an existing design which could be used.

I agree that cost of toilet units is key. SOIL has been able to significantly reduce prices with their concrete models. As Steve has noted, there is potentially less aspirational value with locally produced wooden or concrete models. A key hurdle Steve also hit on and that we have encountered with our model specifically is the need to produce 10s of thousands of units to reach economies of scale. I think Envirosan is a great option for manufacturing. However, I would caution against modifying their current designs, as the ones we are familiar with are not well suited for compact, cartridge-based emptying. We fully agree with the idea of getting several organizations on board that are all interested in ordering units to reach the necessary scale. It may not be possible to have one universal design, however, as it could lead to a design that works ok for everyone but not great for anyone. If we could get all the interested parties to come together to express their needs and finalize a design that meets those we could really make some progress. This is an effort that re.source is very interested in leading.

Especially in rural India, it seems quite heard to push such toilet as people do not want to see their shit after they leave.

Satya,
You are completely correct, this model is not designed for rural areas. There are several reasons CBS is a poor fit in rural areas.
1.) Distance and transport costs are much greater.
2.) Demand for sanitation is much lower than in urban areas.
3.) There are much lower cost (or more culturally targeted) options that often make more sense like the Arborloo or the twin-pit pour-flush models.
4.) Space constraints are less of an issue.

Given the availability of such technologies for rural areas, we tend to view the challenge of rural sanitation as a demand creation, behavior change, supply chain, and business model challenge more than a challenge revolving around the toilet interface itself.

i see the chances of trying this in India is in urban communities where people do not have space at all in home for constructing toilet, neither they can go out for defecating. i also would love to know your experience in reducing the cost of this toilet if it is made of fiber. In urban areas, the business could be around collection and transportation if it is mechanical in India. It needs to be completely mechanical here in India because the low against manual scavenging.

As noted above you are correct, urban areas would be the ideal location to attempt this. We have explored toilets built from fiberglass as have x-runner in Peru and Mosan in Bangladesh. Fiberglass is great for low volume runs however; there is very little reduction of costs with scale. Fiberglass toilets are much higher quality than either wooden or concrete toilets and definitely easier to clean.

Finally, you are also correct that the legal situation is especially tricky in India. Other organizations have attempted efforts in India only to be limited in their scope. I think David makes a good point that before trying anything in the CBS or ecosan suite of options, it is best to get the buy-in not only of the community but from government and regulatory officials as well. The idea of having a demonstration community would be especially helpful in getting their buy-in. It is our understanding that Sulabh has some interest in CBS, and they may have the right relationships to be able to start exploring this system in India.

As for the units, we currently have an urban (slum) system that doesn't give us the life/cost ratio we want. We are trying to get the price down to $300 with a life cycle of 30 years, and are working on a 'virtual' final design as I write. Our model is self-sustaining over this kind of life-cycle.

David, thanks for sharing this information. We'd love to hear more about your toilet design, and particularly the constraints you're designing for- squatters and washers, I presume- but other considerations about space, any thoughts about material, waste removal interface, etc.

Thank you all and we of course would love to hear more comments and thoughts.
All the best,
Kory]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:17:57 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: DavidAlan http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9447 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9447
I would also say that you need to have a model village to which you can show future villagers. Work in clusters that are adjacent to each other and peer groups become your best motivators. Train and educate your first group, build your ecosan, wait a few months and start to take in SHGs and councils. Once they see the difference between a pit toilet (even twin pits) and an ecosan our experience is there is only one winner.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:11:54 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: snghosh http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9438 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9438 i have enjoyed your discussions about this toilet and business around this. I would love to know your experience about the relation between acceptability of this toilet and culture of people or communities where you apply this. Especially in rural India, it seems quite heard to push such toilet as people do not want to see their shit after they leave. There are two key aspects in rural areas which play big role in sanitation behaviors and application of technologies. People who have place in house always want permanent toilet of their won. These people look for two kinds of design (1) septic tank and (2) pit latrine. The pit latrine ( twin pit) are good as it decompose on site and likely to be sustainable mainly for areas where water table is not high and not flooding. it might be similar to many other countries. the other thing that people do not like in India is dry toilet as the culture is using water after defecation. I think toilet in rural areas ( like India) only when majority of people have toilet and do not allow the poor to defecate in their land. In such social pressure poor have no choice other than such toilet.
i see the chances of trying this in India is in urban communities where people do not have space at all in home for constructing toilet, neither they can go out for defecating. i also would love to know your experience in reducing the cost of this toilet if it is made of fiber. In urban areas, the business could be around collection and transportation if it is mechanical in India. It needs to be completely mechanical here in India because the low against manual scavenging.


regards

satya]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:59:39 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: DavidAlan http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9427 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9427
We are currently doing the same thing in villages with single chamber UDDTs and a collection service, but it is too early to discuss the sustainability.

As for the units, we currently have an urban (slum) system that doesn't give us the life/cost ratio we want. We are trying to get the price down to $300 with a life cycle of 30 years, and are working on a 'virtual' final design as I write. Our model is self-sustaining over this kind of life-cycle.

We will have more information later this year or early next.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:33:03 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: stevensugden http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9426 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9426
Black Solder Fly - I recently heard from elsewhere that they prefer other forms of organic waste to shit, and who can blame them?

Cost of unit production - seems to be recurrent issue and I wonder if the wooden / concrete versions have the same appeal. We really need to agree on one design and then approach a single supplier and encourage them to invest in a mold. They usually talk in selling 10s of 1000 of units to enable them to recover their mold costs, so even if we got together, it would be a hard sell. Tim at Envirosan in South Africa may be interested and the may even have an existing design which could be used.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:24:33 +0000
Re: re.source: Mobile Sanitation Services for Dense Urban Slums (Stanford University, USA) - by: CeciliaRodrigues http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9424 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4002-resource-mobile-sanitation-services-for-dense-urban-slums-stanford-university-usa?limit=12&start=24#9424
Thank you all for this very interesting thread. I am learning a lot from it.

@Kory, I watched the video of your presentation at the webinar and there you mentioned that you were considering other treatment technologies and back-end products besides composting, such as the DEWATS and biogas. I am wondering how your research evolved in this regard. Would that be technically feasible considering that you are adopting UDDTs? I suppose you are using sawdust or some other dry material, wouldn't that interfere in other treatment processes?

Kind regards,
Cecília.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 22 Jul 2014 05:25:05 +0000
Re: Open discussion on MOSAN toilet design - by: JKMakowka http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4710-piloting-mobile-sanitation-with-full-service-provision-mosan-now-in-kenya?limit=12&start=12#9046 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4710-piloting-mobile-sanitation-with-full-service-provision-mosan-now-in-kenya?limit=12&start=12#9046 practicalaction.org/blog/news/safer-citi...sanitation-projects/

I doubt one could move a 200kg loaded rickshaw with all the hills (and badly maintained road-sides) here in Kampala though. Never the less, cheap and convenient transport is probably the missing link for a full sanitation service provision chain.]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 24 Jun 2014 06:57:11 +0000
Re: Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management) - by: AParker http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4040-mobile-toilet-in-ghana-wsup-the-clean-team-and-faecal-sludge-management?limit=12&start=12#8607 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/52-mobile-or-portable-solutions-public-toilets/4040-mobile-toilet-in-ghana-wsup-the-clean-team-and-faecal-sludge-management?limit=12&start=12#8607
www.wsup.com/2014/05/12/the-kumasi-smell...rt-and-installation/]]>
Mobile or portable solutions, public toilets Tue, 13 May 2014 17:16:58 +0000