Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management)
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management)

Re: Technology for treating Clean Team waste 27 Apr 2014 11:06 #8344

  • AParker
  • CONTACT
  • Lecturer in International Water and Sanitation at Cranfield University, working on many apsects of urban water and sanitation, including leading Cranfield's response to the BMGF Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.
  • Posts: 39
  • Likes received: 10
  • Karma: 5
muench wrote:
For his Question 2 my guess would be that since it is still a bit of a "pilot", it may not be worth the hassle of producing these toilets locally but that this is probably the long-term goal. Although, mind you, perhaps we are too "hung up" about local production of things - mobile phones are also not produced locally but successful all over the world... Maybe with some types of (plastic) toilets, the same will be true in the end? Just guessing.


This is definitely outside my area of expertise, but I'm not sure there is currently the manufacturing capacity in Ghana? This was the impression i got when visiting a septic tank manufacturer in Accra recently.

muench wrote:
For Kevin's third question, I am also curious - but maybe there is just no market for these fertilisers from excreta, perhaps the soils in Kumasi, Ghana are so fertile as it is (that one one arguments I heard from Uganda why reuse is not a big deal there in the Kampala region at least). Correct me if I am wrong.


Sorry, I missed this bit in my last post. At the moment we are focused on treating the waste so it can be discharged safely without causing a health hazard. This has to be a priority! Then maybe we'll get the chance to look at reuse of nutrients in a subsequent project. Cranfield have a student looking at down-flow adsorption filters for AD effluent and Duke University are developing something similar. But both systems are still under development so couldn't be used in our upcoming trial.

muench wrote:
There is one thing, however, that I still don't get. And that is the blue liquid. We spoke about this kind of liquid in another thread on composting, see e.g. the post by Wolfang Berger here:
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/70-com...gemobile-toilet#7344).
See also here for one example of such a liquid for mobile toilets: www.safetfresh.co.uk/products/stf/ - I am not saying this is the one being used by Clean Team.

I understand it is needed in the Clean Team Toilets in order to control odour in the faeces bucket (even though urine is diverted away and collected separately).
See also this blog post from Gavin Collins about visiting Clean Team in Accra:
microbialecophysiology.com/2014/04/12/vi...to-clean-team-ghana/

Photos that he posted in his Twitter account:

twitter.com/gcollinsgalway/status/454213251791093760/photo/1

twitter.com/gcollinsgalway/status/454210123612061696/photo/1

So my question is, why is the blue liquid required for odour control for this type of toilet whereas it is not for other, similar mobile urine diversion toilets, such as:


Photo of mobile UD toilet from SOIL's website:
twitter.com/SOILHaiti/status/458247946048245760/photo/1


I can think of the following possible reasons (just guessing!):
  1. The customers in Kumasi, Ghana, are more sensitive to smell and are less willing to put up with any smell.
  2. The faeces bucket is emptied less frequently in the Clean Team model than in the other models I mentioned above.
  3. The customers in Kumasi are less diligent and there is more urine going into the faeces bucket than it should.
  4. The blue liquid is not only for odour control but also for aesthetic reasons because the customers prefer to view a blue liquid when they sit down to defecate, rather than their faeces from the time before.
  5. The blue liquid gives the toilet a "modern", Western feeling.

Are any of these possible reasons the actual reason?


Again, this is really down to Clean Team to respond but I would say from my recent visit reason 4 is the closest. The Clean Team toilet has a very simple design, there is no "trapdoor" or anything else in their toilet. So the dark blue liquid means the user does not see the waste, and it also masks the smell. The latter is very important as many customers have the toilets in their homes, even in their bedrooms!

Re: Technology for treating Clean Team waste 28 Apr 2014 20:56 #8359

  • ben
  • CONTACT
  • Water and sanitation engineer
  • Posts: 51
  • Likes received: 15
  • Karma: 3
Dear Alison,

I just wanted to ask you an extra question.
From an outside point of view, and please correct me if I'm wrong, it seems that the "blue liquid" you're using might be close to DOMESTOS, maybe diluted, one of the frontline product sold by Unilever, partner and funder of the ghanasan clean team project.

If this is so, then I invite you to check what this product is made of :
www.astleys.co.uk/acatalog/58043-5_Domestos_Regular_Bleach.pdf

Amines,C12 – 18 – alkyldimethyl, N-oxides / Sodium Hydroxide (OES) / Sodium hypochlorit.

The informations we find in this paper :
DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Small quantities: Wear suitable gloves and eye/face protection. Dilute with water to at least 5% w/v (50 g/litre) and pour down a wastewater drain (foul sewer).
Large quantities: contact a licensed waste management company. Dispose of according to local authority regulations
European waste catalogue 20 01 29 : Detergents containing dangerous substances
Very toxic to aquatic organisms

I checked but not a single product from DOMESTOS seems ecological.

My question is, if DOMESTOS (and again tell me if this is not the product we're talking about) has been sold since 1961 by unilever, can you confirm that Unilever can't actually help you for the downstream treatment of this product, that they never though about ?

I hope I'm wrong, and that Unilever is actually fighting for sustainability, as said :
www.domestos.co.uk/sustainable-cleaning/
www.unileverghana.com/sustainable-living...ainable-living-plan/

Good luck in treating it Alison, and thanks for keeping us updated.

Ben

Re: Technology for treating Clean Team waste 30 Apr 2014 14:23 #8396

  • AParker
  • CONTACT
  • Lecturer in International Water and Sanitation at Cranfield University, working on many apsects of urban water and sanitation, including leading Cranfield's response to the BMGF Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.
  • Posts: 39
  • Likes received: 10
  • Karma: 5
Hi Ben,

It's not domestos! As you say that would be inappropriate!

Alison

Re: Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management) 07 May 2014 08:22 #8501

  • Kevinkuhn
  • CONTACT
  • Posts: 4
  • Likes received: 0
  • Karma: 0
Hi Ben,

I am not quite sure why you assumed that they might use domestos, because there are way better sanitizing liquids on the market, which don´t harm biological WW treatment.

For example, Aqua Kem Green, www.thetford-europe.com/product/aqua-kem-green/ . This is the most commonly used liquid for camping toilets.

However, this product could be considered as 'green liquid' and is obviously not the one used by Clean Team. The same company also supplies a 'blue liquid' which does´t have such good properties regarding the biological decomposition of fecal matter.

I am still curious to find out if the biological treatment system for the Clean Team project can handle the blue liquid and which one you use exactly. Maybe, you Alison, could have a look on such 'green liquid' and might consider it as an opportunity for your systems? In this scenario it would also be interesting to see, if that would raise costs for purchasing the liquid and how the user reactions are compared to the blue liquid.

@Alison, thanks for answering my earlier questions, I am looking forward to get an idea if such green liquid would be an option for Clean Teams treatment system?

Thanks,
Kevin.
Non-Water Sanitation e.V.
www.nonwatersanitation.de

EcoToi - Rental for composting toilets for festivals and construction sites in Berlin, Germany
www.ecotoi.de

Re: Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management) 07 May 2014 09:24 #8504

  • AParker
  • CONTACT
  • Lecturer in International Water and Sanitation at Cranfield University, working on many apsects of urban water and sanitation, including leading Cranfield's response to the BMGF Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.
  • Posts: 39
  • Likes received: 10
  • Karma: 5
Hi Kevin,

A couple of things to clarify - I don't work for or represent Clean Team. However, Cranfield University has been contracted by WSUP (who were involved in founding Clean Team) to investigate options for treating Clean Team's waste. There should be a blog post about this research appearing on the WSUP website soon.

We'll start our field trials in July (hopefully) so after that we'll have an idea about how biological systems handle the "blue liquid".

We're not responsible for any changes to the "blue liquid" but I'll point the relevant staff in Clean Team to this thread to read your suggestions.

Alison

Re: Mobile toilet in Ghana (WSUP), the Clean Team (and faecal sludge management) 13 May 2014 18:16 #8607

  • AParker
  • CONTACT
  • Lecturer in International Water and Sanitation at Cranfield University, working on many apsects of urban water and sanitation, including leading Cranfield's response to the BMGF Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.
  • Posts: 39
  • Likes received: 10
  • Karma: 5
Just to let you know that WSUP's blog post about our research is now online:

www.wsup.com/2014/05/12/the-kumasi-smell...rt-and-installation/
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2
Time to create page: 0.36 seconds