SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Thu, 02 Jul 2015 03:36:11 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: CLTS photo case-study - Malawi - by: DaveTrouba http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13036-clts-photo-case-study-malawi-global-sanitation-fund-and-wsscc-village-near-lake-malawi#13920 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13036-clts-photo-case-study-malawi-global-sanitation-fund-and-wsscc-village-near-lake-malawi#13920
Apologies for the late reply to this thread -- glad that through investigative research you tracked down Kate (who has, sadly, now left us at WSSCC, though for a good opportunity at WMO). The photos and stories came out linked to recent meetings in Malawi where we also arranged field visits for folks on our Steering Committee and those from GSF and elsehwere. As an FYI I attach to this mail the field visit guide. I have also attached the latest GSF progress report, in case you haven't seen it. You might also want to keep the name of Okey Umelo, and his email address This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , in your records, in case you ever need any other information from WSSCC about the GSF, its support work, photos, etc.

Cheers! Dave Trouba, WSSCC]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Mon, 29 Jun 2015 11:01:01 +0000
Re: New Research Summaries and Synthesis: Understanding the Implementation Context for CLTS - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12027-testing-clts-approaches-for-scalability-enhancing-the-role-of-local-actors-in-clts-implementation-plan-usa-and-water-institute-at-unc-kenya-ethiopia-and-ghana#13860 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12027-testing-clts-approaches-for-scalability-enhancing-the-role-of-local-actors-in-clts-implementation-plan-usa-and-water-institute-at-unc-kenya-ethiopia-and-ghana#13860
Thanks for your post which provides these nice, concise, short synthesis documents about understanding the implementation context for CLTS in three countries: Kenya, Ethiopia and Ghana.

I have moved your post into the existing thread about the project by Plan USA, who has partnered with you, to provide more context. Hope that's OK by you.

From your summary 1-page factsheet (forum.susana.org/media/kunena/attachment...ynthesis-2015-04.pdf) I found particularly interesting:

Our findings also aligns with CLTS grey literature, which
commonly notes that structured monitoring would enable
insight into sustained behavior change and scale-up.


and

Our assessments revealed CLTS implementation in Kenya,
Ghana, and Ethiopia relies on financial and human resources
from non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
[...]
This aligns
with GLAAS 2014 findings, which identified substantial gaps
between political aspirations and government capacity
. Where
there are many actors engaged in CLTS, the grey literature
suggests the importance of mechanisms to coordinate actors,
which this study found to be established at the national level
in Kenya and Ghana.


(interesting that you mentioned twice the term "grey literature", how come?)

So thanks very much for sharing and please post more information about your research when it becomes available.

I will also put your four documents in the SuSanA library and then link to it from the project database here:
www.susana.org/en/resources/projects?search=plan+usa

As you must be an expert on CLTS, may I take the opportunity to ask your input on three things:

(1)
Could you please take a look at the questions that Kim Anderson posted above on 18 March about this project? (I had already alerted Darren to them but he didn't reply yet; perhaps Kim's questions were also too "curvy" - but perhaps you could address some of them?).

(2)
Do you have any insights on CLTS in other countries, in particular I am interested in the question why it hasn't worked out in Latin America, for example Bolivia. Please see this thread on the forum: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts...2&start=12#13206 (the link should take you to Page 2 of the discussion).

(3)
And do you have suggestions for improvements to the Wikipedia article on CLTS? I have been working on it with Joe Turner and Jamie Myers and some other Wikipedia editors whom I don't know: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community-led_total_sanitation. Perhaps information from some publications by your institute need to be included and cited?

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Thu, 25 Jun 2015 09:47:17 +0000
Re: CLTS photo case-study - Malawi - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13036-clts-photo-case-study-malawi-global-sanitation-fund-and-wsscc-village-near-lake-malawi#13845 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13036-clts-photo-case-study-malawi-global-sanitation-fund-and-wsscc-village-near-lake-malawi#13845 Thanks to your hint, Joe, I got in touch with Katherine Anderson from WSSCC (who has since left WSSCC). She's the one who took the photos. She sent them to me and allowed me to upload them to the SuSanA flickr database and also to the Wikipedia article on CLTS (open licence, CC BY SA).

You can now find them in this set (and you are allowed to use them):
www.flickr.com/photos/gtzecosan/sets/72157650871109584

I chose this one for the Wikipedia article on CLTS (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community-led_total_sanitation):

Singo Katanga (center) has come to the village to raise awareness of good hygiene in a process known as ‘triggering’. She gets villagers to draw a map of the area, showing the main features like the road and the river. by SuSanA Secretariat, on Flickr

and this one:

Now Singo and the villagers make the transect walk or ‘walk of shame’ by visiting the places they have identified where open defecation takes place. They sing ‘let us end open defecation’. by SuSanA Secretariat, on Flickr

I think the joy and happiness that usually takes place together with CLTS (e.g. to celebrate open defecation free status) is quite special. See also this photo:

Webster and Singo bring the group back to the village meeting space in high spirits. They are energizing the village into taking action to stop defecating in the bush by building toilets. by SuSanA Secretariat, on Flickr

Thanks, Katherine for making these photos available!]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:57:45 +0000
Re: CLTS with inclusive WASH programming (Malawi) - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13839 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13839
Thanks for this information. I have now included your project in our project database, too.
You can see it here when filtering for Malawi (six other projects come up in Malawi, too):
www.susana.org/en/resources/projects?vbl...;vbl_20%5B476%5D=476

And here you can see the other projects that are also funded by AusAID if someone is interested (database filtered by funding source AusAID):
www.susana.org/en/resources/projects?vbl...;vbl_22%5B618%5D=618

To all: If there are more projects funded by AusAID which should be included please bring them to our attention: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Rochelle, I look forward to following your progress with this project on CLTs and inclusive WASH programming in Malawi.

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Wed, 24 Jun 2015 09:40:40 +0000
Re: CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop at AfricaSan IV i Senegal - by: Petra http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12834-clts-sharing-and-learning-workshop-at-africasan-iv-i-senegal#13738 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12834-clts-sharing-and-learning-workshop-at-africasan-iv-i-senegal#13738 Regards,
Petra]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Thu, 18 Jun 2015 07:32:39 +0000
Re: CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop at AfricaSan IV i Senegal - by: WASHanna http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12834-clts-sharing-and-learning-workshop-at-africasan-iv-i-senegal#13735 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12834-clts-sharing-and-learning-workshop-at-africasan-iv-i-senegal#13735
Do you have the IDS presentation from the session at AfricaSan on Tuesday? I'm trying to track it down.

Thanks!]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Wed, 17 Jun 2015 20:33:27 +0000
Re: Scaling up and Strengthening Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) - US Fund for UNICEF - Indonesia, Malawi and other countries - by: kvalente http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13613-scaling-up-and-strengthening-community-approaches-to-total-sanitation-cats-us-fund-for-unicef-indonesia-malawi-and-other-countries#13720 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13613-scaling-up-and-strengthening-community-approaches-to-total-sanitation-cats-us-fund-for-unicef-indonesia-malawi-and-other-countries#13720
I would like to bring your attention to the recent updates made to my original post:

  • Provided an updated description of the role of the regional offices
  • Uploaded the 2012 East Asian & Pacific Region review of CLTS and reports from two learning events around scaling-up rural sanitation in the East Asian & Pacific Region


These updates are to provide more materials and a fuller picture around the learnings gained from this project thus far.

I welcome your comments or questions!

Thanks,
Keiko]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Tue, 16 Jun 2015 18:07:32 +0000
Free webinar: CLTS and Sustainability - by: Petra http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13698-free-webinar-clts-and-sustainability#13698 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13698-free-webinar-clts-and-sustainability#13698
On Wednesday 24th June, from 14.00-15.30 BST (convert to your time zone here www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html), the CLTS Knowledge Hub will offer a webinar on the subject. Sue Cavill, an independent WASH expert, and Robert Chambers, CLTS Knowledge Hub, will be introducing the topic drawing on lessons learnt from Frontiers issue 4- Sustainability and CLTS: Taking Stock (www.communityledtotalsanitation.org/reso...nd-clts-taking-stock). They will give a brief synthesis of where we are and present some of the priority areas for learning.

This will be followed by a presentation on SNVs Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All Results Programme (SSH4A), supported by the UK Department for International Development. Designed to ensure long-lasting improvements in community health and quality of life, the programme is working in fifteen countries across Asia and Africa. The programme has four integrated components. The first, sanitation demand creation, is building the skills of CLTS facilitators and working with authorities to organised and steer demand creation activities. The other three components include improving capacity for supply chains and finance, behaviour change communication and WASH governance.

Register for this free webinar now
attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2533011274735392001]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Mon, 15 Jun 2015 10:12:11 +0000
Re: CLTS with inclusive WASH programming (Malawi) - by: rochelleholm http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13689 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13689 Thank you for your message about the CLTS with inclusive WASH programming happening in Rumphi, Malawi and Bangladesh.

In Malawi, for this project, in April we had a training workshop given by WEDC in which an action plan was developed to ensure when CLTS is delivered it is capturing needs of people with disabilities. CLTS is the central component of the project, with this new action plan to bring awareness to needs of people with disabilities as an avenue for inclusive sanitation.

We are currently in a phase to make observations of this new CLTS with inclusive WASH programming in the field as it is being implemented, including pre-triggering, triggering and follow-up, to again be documented by researchers from Mzuzu University Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation and further comparison to standard CLTS.

This work is separate, but complementary, to the Global Sanitation Fund work happening in Malawi.]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Sat, 13 Jun 2015 21:22:46 +0000
Re: CLTS - urban vs rural - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/1334-what-are-your-thoughts-on-urban-clts-can-it-work?limit=12&start=12#13625 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/1334-what-are-your-thoughts-on-urban-clts-can-it-work?limit=12&start=12#13625
Thanks for bringing this report to our attention. I have moved it into this existing thread where we discussed "urban CLTS" in the past.

Also, let me copy here some key pieces from the report so that it can be found more easily with keyword searches:

+++++++++++

Executive summary:

Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is an innovative methodology for mobilising communities
to completely eliminate open defecation (OD). It has been applied in many rural areas in countries
across the developing world. However, experience in urban settings has been limited. Practical
Action and Umande Trust have implemented a project Realising Rights to Total Sanitation in two
low income settlements in the city of Nakuru, Kenya, adapting the CLTS methodology to meet the
challenges of the urban context. This has involved devising a triggering exercise with landlords as well as tenants and using theatre to attract and sustain interest during community triggering.
Working in an urban area has required considerable attention to designing, through a participatory
process, low cost toilets that meet urban public health and building regulations.

The project has taken steps to address wider issues of faecal sludge management, solid waste
management, access to clean water, and waste water management. It has worked with lending
institutions to assist landlords in accessing the necessary finance to upgrade their facilities. It has also trained and supported government staff to ensure that the processes carried out in this project can be replicated and taken to scale within the county of Nakuru. The project has achieved much of its success through effective coordination and collaboration not only with the County Government Health Department, but with a range of other stakeholders at the local, county and national level.

Whilst the project has largely been successful in facilitating significant reduction of open defecation and other unsanitary practices that left the population exposed to faecal contamination, the villages concerned have not yet been declared open defecation free due to the challenge of achieving universal hand washing facilities next to latrines (a criteria for verification in Kenya). The existence of individual subsidy programmes in the area presents a further challenge to be overcome.

Lessons from this project will be valuable for the scaling up of Community Led Total Sanitation in
Kenya and beyond to ensure that urban sanitation is addressed alongside rural.






+++++++++

I find the comparison table very useful.

I am wondering if it makes sense to still call it "CLTS" when it is so modified so that it works in urban areas, too. Perhaps "CLTS" inherently is for rural areas only, i.e. where you still have a strong communit spirit?

I also wonder if we have examples from other countries, not only Kenya, where this has been applied?

Kind regards,
Elisabeth]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Wed, 10 Jun 2015 08:49:37 +0000
Scaling up and Strengthening Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) - US Fund for UNICEF - Indonesia, Malawi and other countries - by: kvalente http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13613-scaling-up-and-strengthening-community-approaches-to-total-sanitation-cats-us-fund-for-unicef-indonesia-malawi-and-other-countries#13613 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13613-scaling-up-and-strengthening-community-approaches-to-total-sanitation-cats-us-fund-for-unicef-indonesia-malawi-and-other-countries#13613
Title of grant: Scaling up and Strengthening Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS)

Name of lead organization:
o Primary grantee/Administrative & financial grant managers: US fund for UNICEF
o Sub-grantee/Implementing organization: UNICEF

Primary contact at lead organization:
o Principal Investigator: Lizette Burgers; UNICEF HQ
o Financial & Administrative Grant Manager: Keiko Valente, US Fund for UNICEF

Grantee location: New York, USA

Developing country where the research is being or will be tested: Implementation in Indonesia and Malawi, enhanced global learning in East & South Africa (ESARO) and East Asia & Pacific (EAPRO) regions.

Start and end date: November 2012 – November 2016

Grant type: Other

Grant size in USD: $7,523,124 (see also BMGF grant database here)

Short description of the project:
UNICEF is implementing Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) or CATS* programs in a large number of countries globally, mostly in Africa and Asia. This project is designed to assess and analyze CATS innovations and implementation strategies in two countries - Malawi and Indonesia - and to distil and disseminate lessons learned to other UNICEF country programs in Africa and Asia.

With a focus on learning and dissemination, the Regional Offices for East Asia and Pacific (EAPRO) and Eastern and Southern Asia (ESARO) are an integral part of the program and are responsible for:

o providing technical support to implementation countries;
o generating evidence and analysis through studies, assessments etc. for strengthened advocacy at country, regional and global levels;
o facilitating networking and learning exchange opportunities in-country, between countries in the region, cross-regions and across partners, and;
o undertaking the development of the CATS Monitoring Toolkit, case–studies etc., with the aim to strengthen sanitation programs in additional countries through enhanced learning and knowledge exchange both within UNICEF and with its partners.

Among other goals, the project seeks to meet ambitious Open Defecation Free (ODF) ‘hit rates’ , of 66% and a ‘reach’ target of 85%.

* CATS is an umbrella term developed by UNICEF to encompass a wide range of community-based sanitation programming (including CLTS, SLTS, TSC).


Goal: The overall goal of the project is to contribute towards international efforts to increase access to sanitation through the delivery of sustainable sanitation programs at scale in two countries.

The goal is also to contribute towards efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goal for sanitation through the development and implementation of model approaches in two countries and enhanced global learning for sanitation programming in two regions.




Objectives:
o Objective 1: Supplement and expand on-going sanitation programs in two countries (Indonesia and Malawi) with specific emphasis on learning through innovation
o Objective 2: Assess and analyze innovations and implementation strategies in these two countries in order to distil lessons learning and assess the impact of implementation modalities on progress, and to transmit this learning to other countries in two regions

Research or implementation partners:
o Indonesia: Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Community Empowerment, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, provincial departments, local government, local partners
o Malawi: Ministry of Irrigation and Water Development, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Local Government’s District assemblies, World Vision International, Population Services International, Water and Environmental Sanitation Network, Engineers without Borders.

Links, further readings:
o www.unicef.org/wash/
o www.sanitationmonitoringtoolkit.com/
o www.unicef.org/esaro/5479_wash-learning-series.html
o Documents in SuSanA library: www.susana.org/en/resources/library/details/2202

Biggest successes so far:
In Indonesia, access to improved sanitation facilities currently stands at 59% of the population , which is significantly short of the MDG target of 86%. An estimated 54 million people still practice open defecation (OD), or about one quarter of the population. On a country basis, this is second only to the size of the population practicing OD in India. UNICEF is supporting Indonesia’s national “STBM” campaign to help accelerate sanitation progress. A number of key steps have been taken to systematize STBM, including a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice (KAP) survey, a review of the existing evidence, development of STBM training materials, establishment of a knowledge management framework, and undertaking Joint Technical monitoring Reviews with the Government of Indonesia. New alliances have been built to make sanitation and hygiene communications more effective; and the use of social media has been expanded. Through these efforts, the project is starting to better understand replication issues, although there is still work to be done. However, though the enabling environment in Indonesia is generally supportive, a number of key challenges remain, especially prioritization at local levels. Progress achieved against project targets has been off track in terms of number of new latrines constructed. Other challenges include lack of partner implementation capacity, low hit rate of ODF villages, continued fragmentation of the sanitation sector, and impediments to sharing and disseminating lessons learned and the latter remains one of the key objectives of the program.

Malawi declared, in its 2011 national sanitation strategy, that 2015 was the year it would achieve 100% ODF. This would be an astonishing achievement, since (as of 2012) Malawi’s national improved sanitation usage rate was only 10% . This challenge is in part what led UNICEF to select Malawi as one of the focus countries for this project. UNICEF is supporting the national ODF Task Force, and among other activities has helped to improve the national sanitation monitoring system. The project also is strengthening the supply side through latrine construction and business management training, and a marketing campaign carried out in partnership with PSI. However, cumulative progress has been slower than expected. New ODF communities number 446 (representing over 45,000 households). But the ODF ‘hit rate’ is only 30% after 6 months. Positive examples do exist, including one Traditional Area that has attained ODF and which serves as a constructive role model.

Regionally, UNICEF is engaged in a number of monitoring and learning efforts as part of this project - including:
o Online Monitoring & Evaluation Toolkit
o Supporting Kenya, Mozambique, and Madagascar on CATS reviews and tools development
o Preparing CLTS reviews and case studies
o Learning projects including use of Social Norms Theory, small town approaches to CLTS, regional sanitation supply chains research, and reviews of School Led Total Sanitation
o Learning, and dissemination events

Main challenges / frustration:
In both countries, challenges include:
o Prioritization at local levels
o Lack of partner implementation capacity
o Low hit rate of ODF villages
o Continued fragmentation of the sanitation sector and impediments to sharing and disseminating lessons learned
Additionally, in Malawi, a devastating flood in 2015 has interrupted regular UNICEF programming and affected many communities targeted under this grant.

Next Steps:
In Indonesia, UNICEF will continue to support Government to improve communications and advocacy; promote stronger M&E, assess the potential for more intensive supply-side work, and improve post-triggering data capture and analysis. UNICEF also will increase its focus on accelerating progress in weaker-performing districts though the primary focus will be on learning the key lessons to help scaling up and acceleration of sanitation in Indonesia.
In Malawi, UNICEF will continue to work with Population Services International (PSI) to help strengthen sanitation marketing campaigns, and will increase its focus on strengthening local government leadership of sanitation campaigns.

Questions or comments? Please put them in this thread.

Keiko Valente

Manager, Foundation Partnerships
U.S. Fund for UNICEF
125 Maiden Lane
New York, NY 10038, USA
www.unicefusa.org]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Tue, 09 Jun 2015 15:58:04 +0000
Re: CLTS with inclusive WASH programming (Malawi) - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13604 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13045-clts-with-inclusive-wash-programming-malawi#13604
Thanks for letting us know about this project on WASH access for people with disabilities in Bangladesh and Malawi.

It is not clear to me how the CLTS work is integrated into this project, is it a central component or just one of several avenues?

And what is your definition of "new CLTS" when you say:

The next phase involves observations of this new CLTS with inclusive WASH programming, including pre-triggering, triggering and follow-up, to again be documented by researchers from Mzuzu University Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation and further comparison to standard CLTS.


And is the CLTS work in Malawi related to the CLTS work in Malawi under the Global Sanitation Fund? See here on the forum:
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts...to-case-study-malawi

Or e.g. this photo which I have also included in the Wikipedia page about CLTS now:

Singo Katanga (center) has come to the village to raise awareness of good hygiene in a process known as ‘triggering’. She gets villagers to draw a map of the area, showing the main features like the road and the river. by SuSanA Secretariat, on Flickr

Lastly, it would be good to have also this AusAID funded project included in the SuSanA project database:
www.susana.org/en/resources/projects
Could you please provide me with the relevant information (project title, organisation, duration and website link(s))? Then I could easily include it in the database. That would be great.

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Tue, 09 Jun 2015 11:09:24 +0000
CLTS - urban vs rural - by: joeturner http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/1334-what-are-your-thoughts-on-urban-clts-can-it-work?limit=12&start=12#13579 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/1334-what-are-your-thoughts-on-urban-clts-can-it-work?limit=12&start=12#13579 infohub.practicalaction.org/oknowledge/b...uruKenya_Apr2015.pdf

I saw it mentioned in a Practical Action blog, see here: practicalaction.org/blog/where-we-work/k...rban-and-rural-clts/]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Fri, 05 Jun 2015 08:54:44 +0000
New SuSanA Case Study on CLTS in Liberia - by: aurban http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13544-new-susana-case-study-on-clts-in-liberia#13544 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/13544-new-susana-case-study-on-clts-in-liberia#13544 www.susana.org/en/resources/case-studies/details/2257) Global Communities' new SuSanA case study focused on CLTS in Liberia and its application to Ebola response.

**********************************
Additional infos by moderator


Global Communities developed an innovative “CLTS+” approach by tailoring the proven CLTS methodology to community-specific needs in order to create a more sustainable and scalable program model for some of Liberia’s most vulnerable communities.

The IWASH program goal was to make measurable, community-focused improvements in water supply, sanitation and hygiene in Bong, Lofa and Nimba counties in Liberia. Building on existing program frameworks. IWASH sought to:
  1. Increase access to water supply, sanitation, hygiene education and household-level hygiene products.
  2. Raise community knowledge and use of potable water supply options and storage technologies, sanitation facilities and hygiene practices.
  3. Develop an enabling environment for WASH at the national, county, district and community levels.

Enjoy reading this very interesting new case study!]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Tue, 02 Jun 2015 14:23:28 +0000
Re: New Study from Bangladesh - finds CLTS ineffective without subsidies - by: eendres http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12946-new-study-from-bangladesh-finds-clts-ineffective-without-subsidies?limit=12&start=12#13244 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts-community-led-total-sanitation-and-other-community-led-approaches/12946-new-study-from-bangladesh-finds-clts-ineffective-without-subsidies?limit=12&start=12#13244
I also question the LSA model used, but not necessarily the use of salaries to compensate LSAs (see iDE's awesome summary of the HYSTRA report attached--having a full-time, dedicated sales force can reduce turnover and increase efficiency). My real concern is that they weren't use effectively. Their roles are described in the supplemental document as: 1) providing information about where to buy a latrine; 2) enabling households to assess the quality of latrines being sold; 3) Assist with delivery and installation; and 4) Provide technical support post-purchase. But they were also instructed not to provide information about the benefits of latrine use!

There was no intervention tested that combined demand creation (either through village level sanitation promotion like LPP, or through IPC or DCC via sales agents) with supply. Just as the success of CLTS is limited without a functioning supply chain, the supply chain cannot function without a sufficient level of demand. I wonder what the results would have been if LSAs were able to have conversations about the benefits of latrine use and the difficulties of OD AND connect people with aspirational and affordable products?

I'd also be interested to see what the use rates are in, say, six months to a year. Did the size of the subsidy make the product cheap enough to buy, whether or not the purchaser really intended to change OD habits? Maybe. But I think there's room to explore how subsidies could actually benefit the private sector, if used in the right way. For example, could these subsidies, in the form of vouchers, actually support the private sector by giving them access to a portion of the market that they wouldn't have without the help of subsidies? Could those vouchers give the poorest the ability (and the dignity) to purchase a latrine that they can be proud to use, AND help make sanitation a more viable business (which would not only help current sanitation businesses survive and grow, but also encourage more entrepreneurship in the sector)?]]>
CLTS (Community led total sanitation) and other community led approaches Fri, 08 May 2015 03:39:23 +0000