SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Tue, 04 Aug 2015 07:24:36 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: Fit For School Approach (F4S) - 10 primary schools in Moshi, Tanzania - by: hajo http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#14348 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#14348
1 the training for ministries, LGAs (local government) and NGOs has been done in the first half of June;

2 ChildReach (-> www.childreachtz.org ) our NGO in Moshi has held training with school management of 10 schools and with respective ward officers about the F4S approach;

3 the hand-washing facilities have been tendered and contract will be awarded shortly (see also forum.susana.org/forum/categories/160-ha...imit=12&start=24 );

4 I have followed the discussion on the Forum where the usefulness of mass deworming among school children is being questioned (see also forum.susana.org/forum/categories/159-in...as-much-of-an-impact );

5 ... and it has been questioned whether F4S should be a (core) activity of a GIZ water programme. Thus financing of our activity beyond Feb2016 is not yet sure.

Ciao Hajo]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Thu, 30 Jul 2015 12:28:04 +0000
Exploring the Issues around Rural On-Site School Sanitation in South Africa - by: SudhirPillay http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/14082-exploring-the-issues-around-rural-on-site-school-sanitation-in-south-africa#14082 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/14082-exploring-the-issues-around-rural-on-site-school-sanitation-in-south-africa#14082
This document is going to print soon. I have placed this electronic copy without the cover and before its uploaded onto the WRC website so that interested people may have a look.

WRC Project: K5/2381
Authors: Partners in Development (main; see details for full list)
WRC Manager: Jay Bhagwan
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Summary:
This document represents a preliminary exploration of school sanitation in South Africa as part of the study titled Evaluating the design of existing rural school sanitation infrastructure and developing a model and guidelines for optimal design which is being conducted by Partners in Development on behalf of the Water Research Commission. This document explores the background and status of school sanitation in South Africa and its legal environment and looks at best practice for the design of facilities and choice of systems and technologies. What this exploration revealed was the fact that the failure or success of infrastructure is fundamentally linked to the needs, resources, attitudes and beliefs of management and the users of school sanitation, and that any attempt to improve the status quo must come from a perspective of a “total solution” which addresses all of these elements coherently. While this document touches on how infrastructure interfaces with user needs and the implications for management, a careful review of models for management and user education is planned as the study progresses. It is clear that addressing these three elements – infrastructure, management and education – together is vital in order to expect that any intervention might succeed. An assessment of sanitation at 100 rural schools in KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and the Eastern Cape is underway (December 2014) as part of this study. The assessment involves an inventory of sanitation stock and its condition, interviews with the principal and cleaner (where there is one) and a focus group with learners allowing some triangulation of viewpoints between different stakeholders. The assessment tools can be found in Annexure A at the end of this document and can be used by anyone wishing to better understand the issues around sanitation at a given school. In addition, we will facilitate a discussion of these issues at national level during 2015 and the insights gleaned from this process and from the assessments will be published by the Water Research Commission in early 2016. It is our hope that this study contributes to the wellbeing of South Africa’s children during the hours in which they are at school.]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 07 Jul 2015 11:28:47 +0000
Re: Fit For School Approach (F4S) - 10 primary schools in Moshi, Tanzania - by: hajo http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#13550 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#13550
I understand your question also as a hint that I should continue reporting what happens in Moshi

Ok: Moshi is actually part of a pilot programme implemented by Gov. of Tanzania (MoE, MoH, ..), UNICEF and GIZ in 5 towns in Tanzania, with Moshi being one of them. After the two missions between MoE, UNICEF and GIZ, it was decided that the pilot should only comprise hand-washing for the reasons that a) funds and time of the current GIZ programme phase are limited to Feb2016 and b) to monitor and prove the outcome of other interventions (tooth-brushing, de-worming, trachoma prevention) would require more in-depth baseline (health outcome) studies before the intervention. Thus this 1st pilot phase until Feb2016 comprises only routine group hand-washing with soap, supported by GIZ at each 10 primary schools in Moshi and Dar es Salaam, respectively, and by UNICEF at 40 more schools in 3 other towns. A further 2nd pilot would then entail other interventions as mentioned.

The strategy of F4S is a high involvement and ownership by the respective national and local governments, school authorities and communities to ensure sustainability and to build capacities for up-scaling (within the respective local government area (LGA) and nation-wide, respectively). For this purpose we have organised a 2-week training with the national ministries (MoE, MoH, MoLG, MoW), with the respective LGAs and the NGOs who represent GIZ at local level. The training started on 1st June 2015 and is facilitated by a colleague from the Philippines who gathered there year-long experiences in the F4S approach.

We are currently also looking into the re-design of the group hand-washing facilities on basis of templates we received from Asia and adapt them to the local conditions (availability of material and workmanship). The facilities will then hopefully be produced, delivered and installed over the next 3 months.

After the training a baseline survey will be performed to establish the conditions of 1) the water supplies to the schools, 2) sanitation facilities, 3) existing hand-washing facilities and 4) knowledge and behaviour of pupils regarding hand-washing. The survey of the infrastructure will help to establish necessary work and costs to bring them to a standard supporting the hand-washing intervention. The survey of the behaviour should show as to how far the individual behaviour (washing hands after toilet) can be influenced by the routine group hand-washing activity. Will it have an impact?

This is where we are currently and you may remind me again if I forget to report on the progress,
Ciao Hajo]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Wed, 03 Jun 2015 05:27:16 +0000
Re: Promoting School WASH Solutions at Scale through Action-Research: SWASH+ Phase II in Kenya (CARE, USA) - by: mcheneycoker http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13547 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13547
Thanks for your interest in the project. Please see some responses to your questions below:

1. Is the project entirely a research investigation or is there an implementation component? That is, have the schools and school administration been funded to stimulate their interest and participate in the project? It is a significant step to see that the Ministry is increasing its funding towards school WASH as a result of the project. Has there been funneling of development aid funds from elsewhere in this equation? There was a more substantial implementation component in Phase I so the schools got both hardware and software from SWASH+. However, it was a relatively small number (200 schools) as the implementation was only instrumental to the research, rather than an end in and of itself. Similarly any implementation in Phase II is instrumental and even more limited as far as material benefit. Schools aren't receiving any funding and where they are receiving hardware (urban private sector trial of 20 schools) they have to come up with part of the costs, to simulate a real-world scenario. As far as development aid funds from elsewhere, I'm not privy to this information, however, the government increased its overall per pupil allocation to schools, not just for WASH, in support of a new school health strategy.

2. I am wondering whether the schools differentiate between CAPEX (capital expenditure) and OMEX (OPEX) (operating expenditure) when they perform their budgeting or is there one pot of money for both? They have not differentiated heretofore, hence the need for disseminating info on life cycle costs and appropriate budgeting guidelines.

3. In calculating the Total LCC (life cycle cost) how did the project discount the capital costs and if so over how many lifetime years in order to arrive at the figure of 800 KEH per year per pupil? Not sure what is meant by discounting capital costs but to the second half of the question, LCCs were calculated over a 10 year period.

4. I can see it was the head teachers in the schools that got most involved in the mobile-based data collection with excellent levels of participation. What about the school administration officials? Could they also get involved in the governance surveys? What will happen to these data in terms of packaging them for institutional learning? If by school administration officials other than head teachers you mean school management committees, I don't know the answer. This will depend on the Government of Kenya policies for collecting data from the schools. Accessibility is a whole other story and will also depend on the GoKs progress on an EMIS platform.

5. How are the Sanergy ecosan projects going? Is there positive receptivity among pupils and school staff? Do the staff use these toilets? Gardens being set up for the pupils to take care of? Any LCC data linked to collection, treatment and reuse? Unfortunately I can't answer this question with much specificity until the results come out. There are no gardens in the intervention and yes, LCC data is already available as it's based on the Sanergy model.

6. Are there any data to assess a school's capacity to maintain its water supply and toilets? Where are the weak links in the value chain and where is internal funding still lacking? The governance trial will hopefully surface some interesting findings about how schools' administrative capacity, incentives for and prioritization of WASH individually affect operations and maintenance. As far as funding, our LCC data points out that though current government allocations are in theory sufficient to cover existing maintenance costs, there is a funding gap (currently filled mainly by donors) as far as new infrastructure.

7. What about the impacts on school attendance and "happiness" among the youngest children? Can these be monitored using the mobile-based data collection? Any knock-on impacts on the families/communities and their use of toilets at home? Knowledge about urine as a fertilizer can be a valuable take home message and activity. Any possibility of linking the project up with Community Health Club model pioneered by Africa Ahead (see here on the forum: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts...inistry-of-health-in)? All interesting ideas though not currently in the scope of SWASH+ II. Please see www.swashplus.org for data on the impact on attendance (our research found an increase of up to 39% in girl's attendance). ]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 02 Jun 2015 20:03:03 +0000
Re: Promoting School WASH Solutions at Scale through Action-Research: SWASH+ Phase II in Kenya (CARE, USA) - by: campbelldb http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13509 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13509
Best regards,
Dan Campbell]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Fri, 29 May 2015 19:00:32 +0000
Re: Fit For School Approach (F4S) - 10 primary schools in Moshi, Tanzania - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#13461 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#13461
Thanks for this detailed information. Do I understand right that you will only implement one of the three pillars of the Fit for School approach, i.e. the handwashing? Why not also the bi-annual deworming? I guess the teeth brushing was not a priority in Tanzania as you luckily don't have the same level of tooth decay there as in Philippines, right?

By the way, we have included the Fit for School approach here on the Wikipedia page on helminthiasis:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthiasis#Mass_deworming_of_children

Successful deworming and positive health outcomes were also achieved by the Essential Health Care Program implemented by the Philippine Department of Education in the Philippines. UNICEF has noted it as an "outstanding example of at scale action to promote children’s health and education".[44] Deworming twice a year, supplemented with washing hands daily with soap, brushing teeth daily with fluoride, is at the core of this national program. It has also been successfully implemented in Indonesia.[45]


The same section in Wikipedia also states, however, that:
Although mass dewormings improves the health of an individual, outcomes such as improved cognitive ability, nutritional benefits, physical growth and performance, and learning are still in question.[46]

This seems a bit counter-intuitive and somewhat disappointing.
(I might start a separate thread for this issue on evidence of school deworming on health and school attendance)

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Wed, 27 May 2015 09:19:52 +0000
Re: Promoting School WASH Solutions at Scale through Action-Research: SWASH+ Phase II in Kenya (CARE, USA) - by: arno http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13446 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13446 Thanks for all the details describing the SWASH Plus Project. I can see lots of progress is being made. I have a few questions for you.

1. Is the project entirely a research investigation or is there an implementation component? That is, have the schools and school administration been funded to stimulate their interest and participate in the project? It is a significant step to see that the Ministry is increasing its funding towards school WASH as a result of the project. Has there been funneling of development aid funds from elsewhere in this equation?

2. I am wondering whether the schools differentiate between CAPEX (capital expenditure) and OMEX (OPEX) (operating expenditure) when they perform their budgeting or is there one pot of money for both?

3. In calculating the Total LCC (life cycle cost) how did the project discount the capital costs and if so over how many lifetime years in order to arrive at the figure of 800 KEH per year per pupil?

4. I can see it was the head teachers in the schools that got most involved in the mobile-based data collection with excellent levels of participation. What about the school administration officials? Could they also get involved in the governance surveys? What will happen to these data in terms of packaging them for institutional learning?

5. How are the Sanergy ecosan projects going? Is there positive receptivity among pupils and school staff? Do the staff use these toilets? Gardens being set up for the pupils to take care of? Any LCC data linked to collection, treatment and reuse?

6. Are there any data to assess a school's capacity to maintain its water supply and toilets? Where are the weak links in the value chain and where is internal funding still lacking?

7. What about the impacts on school attendance and "happiness" among the youngest children? Can these be monitored using the mobile-based data collection? Any knock-on impacts on the families/communities and their use of toilets at home? Knowledge about urine as a fertilizer can be a valuable take home message and activity. Any possibility of linking the project up with Community Health Club model pioneered by Africa Ahead (see here on the forum: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/5-clts...inistry-of-health-in)?

Best wishes as 2015 progresses.
--Arno]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 26 May 2015 13:26:20 +0000
Promoting School WASH Solutions at Scale through Action-Research: SWASH+ Phase II in Kenya (CARE, USA) - by: mcheneycoker http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13299 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13299-promoting-school-wash-solutions-at-scale-through-action-research-swash-phase-ii-in-kenya-care-usa#13299 I would like to introduce to you a project that I am involved with as "Senior Learning and Influencing Advisor" and which is funded by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation:

Title of grant: SWASH+ (Phase 2) Sustaining and Scaling School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Plus Community Impact




Name of lead organization: CARE
Primary contact at lead organization: Peter Lochery, Water Team Director; Malaika Cheney-Coker, Senior Learning and Influencing Advisor, Water.
Grantee location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA (Care USA headquarters)
Developing country where the research is being tested: Kenya
Start and end date: November 2012 – March 2016 (Phase 1 was from Sept 1, 2006 to August 30, 2011 and was also funded by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, see here in grant database) *
Grant size in USD: $1,838,868 as per BMGF grant database)

Short description of the project (Phase 2):

The overall goal of SWASH+ Phase II is to improve the sustainability and effectiveness of school water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) at scale in order to support the Government of Kenya’s Comprehensive School Health Policy. The project has the following key objectives:

• Decision-makers have access to and act on high quality data to make investment decisions to provide school WASH services.
• Decision-makers have access to information on school WASH life cycle costs and allocate resources accordingly.
• Decision-makers access learning and take measures to improve school WASH governance, inclusive of accountability and support at all levels.

Like Phase I, phase II is based on an action-research-advocacy approach that seeks to test and promote viable solutions to implementing school WASH services with officials at school, county and national level.

The project consists of a research arm and an advocacy arm.

The research arm of the project is comprised of the following studies:

• Life Cycle Cost Study (completed) – This study entailed a cost analysis conducted in Kisumu, Nyeri and Kilifi counties of what it takes to implement and maintain a school WASH system over a 10-year period. It demarcates costs into capital, operations and maintenance, recurrent, etc, for more efficient budgeting and attention to oft-neglected costs.
• Private Sector Trial (ongoing)– Working with social enterprise eco-latrine organization Sanergy, this study is investigating the outcomes and feasibility of introducing private sector provision and maintenance of eco-latrines in underserved urban primary schools in Nairobi.
• Education Management Information System (EMIS) (ongoing) trial – The EMIS trial has focused on the use of mobile phone-based data collection (in Kisumu, Nyeri and Kilifi counties and at national level) to improve the quality and compliance of reporting from schools, including on WASH data.
• Governance trial (ongoing) – This trial in Kisumu, Nyeri and Kilifi counties is comprised of several arms that experiment with improving communication flows to and from parents, increasing incentives and promoting accountability for providing school WASH services. It features ideas such as using mobile phone-based ratings for services, and promoting WASH messages and support through take-home calendars.

The policy arm of the project has thus far focused on using the results of the life cycle cost study to recommend more and better allocations to decision makers within the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, including the Budget Task Force. In addition, SWASH+ advocates within the ministry, for the adoption of mobile-based data collection by government.

* Information about Phase 1 of the project (2006-2011)
Sustaining and Scaling School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Plus Community Impact, the SWASH+ project, is a five-year applied research project to identify, develop, and test innovative approaches to school-based water, sanitation and hygiene in Nyanza Province, Kenya.
Since September 2006, SWASH+ has worked in 185 primary schools in four districts in Nyanza Province, setting up school water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, gathering data, learning about challenges and testing solutions for school WASH.
The project was designed with a strong advocacy-for-policy-change focus in order to contribute to successful implementation of school WASH.


Research or implementation partners: Government of Kenya (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST) and Ministry of Public Health) CARE, Emory University, Georgetown University

Links, further readings – results to date:

o See attachments for more info on the trials
o Human interest stories from Phase II schools can be found here: water.care2share.wikispaces.net/School+WASH#Resources-Kenya
o Extensive documentation on the findings from Phase I can be found at www.washinschools.info/page/1380 or www.swashplus.org.


Current state of affairs:

All research studies in the project are either completed or well underway. Findings on the private sector trial and governance trials will emerge later this year. The policy work is coming into greater focus in advance of an annual review meeting in May.

Biggest successes so far:

One of the most notable milestones is the government’s recent decision, in the light of action research by SWASH+ and others, in Phase I and Phase II, to increase their recommended budget allocations for a variety of school WASH costs—including capital, operations and maintenance, along with other related expenditures.

In 2014, overall public primary school per-pupil grants from the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology increased from KShs 1,020 (10.7 USD) to KShs 1,356(14.23 USD) per child, per year. WASH-related budget lines increased by 64 percent, from the initial KShs 137 (1.44 USD) to a total of KShs 225 (2.36 USD) per child, which cover 98% of life cycle costs (LCCs) for existing school WASH systems and 28% of LCCs for systems requiring installation. The new KShs 225 also includes additional budget lines for Environmental Sanitation (KShs 50 (0.52 USD)) and Sanitary Towels (KShs 15 (0.16 USD)). WASH-specific vote heads were increased from KShs 28 (.293 USD) to KShs 105 (1.10 USD) (a difference of KShs 77 (.81 USD)).

These recent increases suggest that the SWASH+ partners’ approach of close engagement with the Government of Kenya over the long term—through sharing research data in particular—positively influenced the MoEST’s budget decisions. The SWASH+ project was also nominated to sit on an Advocacy Task Group co-chaired by the MoH and MoEST—an indicator of the credibility built up by the project.

Main challenges / frustration:

During the design of the second phase, a much more hand-in-hand relationship with government was envisioned, with partners from both ministries being the ones to drive the research agenda. However, election cycles, bureaucracy, the impracticality of routing project funds through government, and the loss of initial champions within the former ministry of education are some challenges that have stymied a more dynamic partnership with government. This notwithstanding, collaboration from ministry partners has been strong, if somewhat less hands-on than initially envisioned.

I am available for questions or comments you may have.

Malaika]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Mon, 11 May 2015 14:33:57 +0000
Advancing WASH in schools monitoring – new UNICEF publication - by: F H Mughal http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13092-advancing-wash-in-schools-monitoring--new-unicef-publication#13092 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/13092-advancing-wash-in-schools-monitoring--new-unicef-publication#13092 Advancing WASH in schools monitoring

Globally, school water and sanitation coverage both increased by six per cent between 2008 and 2013. This is one of the key messages from a new UNICEF working paper “Advancing WASH in schools monitoring“.

The paper presents the best data available for the coverage of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services in primary schools gathered from 149 countries for the period 2008-2013. It also compares current national WASH in Schools (WinS) monitoring indicators against global guidelines.

By providing this information the publication responds to the 2012 Call to Action, Raising Even More Clean Hands. It also aims to promote and support improved monitoring of WinS so that coverage indicators can be included in the forthcoming Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The key messages of the paper are:

  • More countries are reporting school water and sanitation coverage data each year
  • Globally, school water and sanitation coverage both increased by six per cent between 2008 and 2013
  • Hand-washing facility coverage is rarely reported
  • The quality of WinS coverage data is questionable, including poorly defined and inconsistent indicators
  • Many countries solicit WinS information through their Education Management Information System (EMIS) questionnaires
  • Sanitation is the most comprehensively monitored WinS component; hygiene is the least
  • WinS data captured in EMIS questionnaires are often underutilized.



The paper concludes with recommendations for action for both the national and international levels.

UNICEF, 2015. Advancing WASH in schools monitoring. (Working paper). New York, NY, USA: UNICEF. 65 p. : 23 fig., 10 tab. Available at: www.unicef.org/wash/schools/files/Advanc...hools_Monitoring.pdf

(Source: sanitationupdates.wordpress.com/2015/04/...-unicef-publication/)

F H Mughal]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 28 Apr 2015 05:12:50 +0000
Fit For School Approach (F4S) - 10 primary schools in Moshi, Tanzania - by: hajo http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#12772 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/12772-fit-for-school-approach-f4s-10-primary-schools-in-moshi-tanzania#12772
This is to inform you on a Fit For School (F4S) project we are about to start at 10 primary schools in Moshi/Tanzania:

• F4S was developed in the Philippines and concentrates on the integration of simple measures into the daily school routine as group activities thereby improving hygiene, health, attendance rates and performance. These activities are: hand washing with soap, daily supervised tooth brushing and bi-annual deworming.

• When developing the idea to introduce the approach in the African context, Tanzania was selected as a pilot country.

• After a learning visit of Tanzanian officials to the Philippines, in 2013 a mission of UNICEF, GIZ and the Ministry of Education confirmed the positive conditions to implement a Fit for School approach in Tanzania.

• A second mission was commissioned in October 2014 to develop a pilot proposal for the adaptation of the Fit for School Approach.

• Childreach Tanzania (www.childreachtz.org/) was selected by GIZ to be the implementing partner for Moshi.

• 10 primary schools (5 each in Moshi Municipal and Moshi Rural) were selected and approved by the Moshi Sanitation Technical Committee (TC) on 02 April 2015.

• The TC is a body newly established in January 2015 and comprising public and private stakeholders in sanitation activities in Moshi Municipal.

• The task of the TC is to keep track of sanitation activities in town and ensure their sustainable implementation in accordance with local laws and regulations.

• The first phase of the F4S project will be implemented between May 2015 and February 2016 in close collaboration between ChildReach, Moshi Municipal, Moshi Rural and GIZ.

• The first phase will (only) try to make hand-washing with soap a sustainable routine group activity at the 10 selected schools. Other activities will be done under a possible further project phase after Feb16.

We will keep you posted with further developments,

Ciao, Hajo

PS: Shobana is on her way to Moshi and will join us to kick-start the project.]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 07 Apr 2015 16:50:54 +0000
Re: Looking for standards for school toilets (recommended toilets:learners) - by: kipkeny http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/3717-looking-for-standards-for-school-toilets-recommended-toiletslearners?limit=12&start=12#11173 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/3717-looking-for-standards-for-school-toilets-recommended-toiletslearners?limit=12&start=12#11173
Please follow on the link below which will take you to a manual developed jointly by WHO/UNICEF for the minimum standards of WASH Services in schools in low income countries

www.unicef.org/wash/files/WASH_in_schools_manual.pdf

Hope this will be of help]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Fri, 28 Nov 2014 10:03:21 +0000
Re: Fwd: AW: question on school toilet standards in different countries - by: denniskl http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/3717-looking-for-standards-for-school-toilets-recommended-toiletslearners?limit=12&start=12#11162 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/3717-looking-for-standards-for-school-toilets-recommended-toiletslearners?limit=12&start=12#11162
And responsibility for these activities post-installation needs to be clear from the start - who, what, when, why etc

So I think responsibility for failure of toilet facilities to be used and kept in good order can, in many cases, be laid at the feet of the original project team - the job is not done just because the toilets are built

Great to see systems being put in place to address this such as at: www.washtechnologies.net/en/]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Wed, 26 Nov 2014 22:16:25 +0000
Re: Design and Construction of Water Supply and Sanitary Facilities in Schools - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11151 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11151 forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-sch...nded-toiletslearners

The thread was called "looking for standards for school toilets, recommended toilets to learners ratio"

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Wed, 26 Nov 2014 12:42:12 +0000
Re: Design and Construction of Water Supply and Sanitary Facilities in Schools - by: F H Mughal http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11137 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11137
That is great!

If permissible and possible, please share your design. It would be useful to others on this forum, including me.

I remember, quite some time back, Elisabeth posted some standards (probably, UNICEF standards) on number of school children for 1 toilet, spacing of toilets, ventilation; and also on water points.

Elisabeth: Can you help?

Regards,

F H Mughal]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Wed, 26 Nov 2014 05:16:41 +0000
Re: Design and Construction of Water Supply and Sanitary Facilities in Schools - by: Wubishet http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11124 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/27-schools-sanitation-and-hygiene-in-schools/5299-design-and-construction-of-water-supply-and-sanitary-facilities-in-schools#11124 Thank you very much for sharing this important resource. This will support me for the design, construction and supervision of water supply and sanitary facilities in schools and also I will adopt this to the local community.

Regards,
Wubishet]]>
Schools (sanitation and hygiene in schools) Tue, 25 Nov 2014 05:41:27 +0000