SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://forum.susana.org/ Thu, 05 Mar 2015 15:59:11 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: 3rd WHO on Report on NTD's (Neglected Tropical Diseases): Opportunities and Challenges - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12312 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12312
Thanks for your post. Could you tell us a bit more about yourself, namely in which capacity did you attend that launch in London? Were there others from the WASH sector as well or were you a "lone voice"?

I find the discourse on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) very interesting. I learnt a lot about it by reading and improving the Wikipedia article on NTDs. I think it is quite a good article now, and I inserted some links to WASH issues and focussed in particular on the helminthiasis as I find that very important.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neglected_tropical_diseases

The article should have more photos though, at the moment it only has one. If you can think of other improvements that should be made, in particular to strengthen the links to WASH issues, please let me know (or edit them directly in Wikipedia).

One important reason why this article is so good is because it was once a student assignment and this student was rather good! See here on the talk page from one year ago:

Plans for Editing Article

I am an undergraduate student at Rice University in Houston, TX and am planning on editing this article as part of a Poverty, Justice, and Human Capabilities class. I would like to expand this article and add more information about the specific diseases and their sociological impact. [...]

I understand the reasoning behind removing the “tropical” aspect of neglected tropical diseases, but since this is a specific term for a category of diseases recognized by the WHO, CDC, and many researchers, that occur primarily in the tropics, I think it is better to keep the term “tropical” in the title. I will, however, research whether there are any other diseases that “neglected” by the neglected tropical disease category.

I would welcome any feedback that anyone has on this.Juliannadrew (talk) 21:58, 20 February 2014 (UTC)


I am just mentioning this as an example because I always encourage lecturers to get their students involved in editing Wikipedia articles...

One thing I didn't realise until working on these articles is that not all helminth infections fall in the category of NTDs! To make this point clearer, I wrote this section on the helminthiasis page:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthiasis#Neglected_tropical_diseases

Neglected tropical diseases
Among all helminthiases, the following helminth infections are classified under neglected tropical diseases:[2][27]

  • All soil-transmitted helminthiases
  • Roundworm infections such as lymphatic filariasis, dracunculiasis and onchocerciasis
  • Trematode infections such as schistosomiasis and food-borne trematodiases (including fascioliasis, clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis, and paragonimiasis)
  • Tapeworm infections such as cysticercosis, taeniasis, and echinococcosis



I would have thought that it's easier to put simply all helminthiasis into the group of NTDs - does anyone know why this wasn't done?

Regards,
Elisabeth]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 02 Mar 2015 13:18:58 +0000
Re: 3rd WHO on Report on NTD's (Neglected Tropical Diseases): Opportunities and Challenges - by: F H Mughal http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12297 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12297
This is a interesting WHO, and your question on WASH integration is most pertinent. The WHO report does not carry names of authors. I suggest that, if you can hold of focal person at WHO, perhaps, you can send email to that focal person and seek the answer.

Regards,

F H Mughal]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Sun, 01 Mar 2015 06:52:38 +0000
3rd WHO Report on NTD's (Neglected Tropical Diseases): Opportunities and Challenges - by: RobynChristine http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12262 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12262-3rd-who-report-on-ntds-neglected-tropical-diseases-opportunities-and-challenges#12262
While attending the launch event in London, I posed a question to donors in the room seeking a response on their intentions of ensuring WASH integration in future investment. Not much of a response was given. There is more work to be done to integrate WASH into NTD policy to ensure the sustained elimination of disease. Stayed tuned for the results of a project WaterAid is currently working on with SightSavers and Emory - the development of proposed WASH and NTD sector joint monitoring (with prioritized indicators and feasible metrics).

Report attached and accessible from: www.who.int/neglected_diseases/en/]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:52:41 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: joeturner http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12249 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12249
A study conducted in rural KwaZulu Natal among school children (median age 11) found that 53% of girls and 37% of boys practiced geophagia; the practice decreased with age for boys but not for girls and was more common among children from families of higher socio-economic status
]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Wed, 25 Feb 2015 09:34:34 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: SudhirPillay http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12247 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12247
You may contact Bobbie herself ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) or Jay Bhagwan ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:58:27 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - and helminthic therapy - by: hadley http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12233 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12233 [Start of Page 2 of the discussion thread]

Hi Joe,

I'm new to this forum, so please excuse any breaches of etiquette. I haven't read the whole thread, so forgive me if you've heard all this before.

The area of my practice is largely subtropical with hot and humid summers and warm dry winters. I suspect that the summer months, December, January and February, are the ones most enjoyed by helminths. There are two possible depths at which the ova could be acquired. Where "night soil" (human faeces) is used as a fertilizer it may be dug into the field or garden. Viable ova may then be deposited a spade's depth into the soil. More commonly surface contamination results in easier access! We looked at ova counts as an index of the severity of infestation and found some of our children were excreting 30,000 ova per gram of stool. If the worms all matured and were laid end to end they would stretch over 4 kms. Multiply that by the mass of the stool and the scale of the problem becomes clear!! I don't know anything about the survival of buried ova but their environment is likely to be warm and damp which would surely aid their survival.
I'm not aware of any data relating to soil temperatures, but there are a lot of things of which I am not aware. They probably exist somewhere.

Children may eat soil accidentally by sucking dirty fingernails or it may be given as part of a traditional potion. Pregnant women apparently do it to address a real or perceived mineral deficiency.
Hakuna matata

Larry Hadley]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:35:19 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: muench http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12216 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12216 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthic_therapy

The first sentence states:
"Helminthic therapy, an experimental type of immunotherapy, is the treatment of autoimmune diseases and immune disorders by means of deliberate infestation with a helminth or with the ova of a helminth."

I have no idea whether this Wikipedia page is accurate or not, I just wanted to mention its existence.

Apart from that I personally think this thread is becoming off-topic now (see Rule number 8 here: forum.susana.org/forum/rules) as the purpose of this forum is not to discuss all sorts of health hypotheses and alternative treatment methods for all sorts of ailments. There is other discussion forums for that out there. This is my personal opinion.


[End of Page 1 of the discussion thread]]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 21:09:54 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12215 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12215 Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 18:07:38 +0000 Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12214 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12214 Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:56:25 +0000 Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: joeturner http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12213 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12213
sciencenotes.ucsc.edu/2014/pages/hookworm/hookworm.html

"Most researchers and doctors say it’s still too early for people to safely infect themselves"

It is one thing to do this in a situation where there is good access to advanced medical care, something else altogether in a situation where ascaris is known to cause widespread untreated disease.]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:50:20 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12212 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12212
People use hookworms as therapy in gut diseases to regulate the immune system. My theory is worms are vacuuming-up microbial culprits like protozoans and gram-negative bacteria as that's what their tiny mouths are designed to eat. Overgrown, however, worms are thought to consume up to 20% of a child's daily nutritional intake.

Worms are also thought to manufacture vitamin C for the body.]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:34:09 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: joeturner http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12211 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12211
The idea that having ascaris worms in your gut is somehow desirable is ridiculous.]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:26:46 +0000
Re: Gut-Brain Connection and Sanitation - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12206-gut-brain-connection-and-sanitation#12210 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12206-gut-brain-connection-and-sanitation#12210 Epilepsy is another problem not commonly considered a sanitation issue.

The burden of epilepsy in low-income countries is more than twice that found in high-income countries

www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(12)61381-6/abstract
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/12...ping-world-described

People, including neurologists, currently treat seizure disorders from the neck up, yet ample evidence exists pointing to the gut-brain as cause of many seizure disorders.]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:25:42 +0000
Re: Geophagy - the cultural practices of eating soil - common in many sub-Saharan countries? - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12208 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/8092-geophagy-the-cultural-practices-of-eating-soil-common-in-many-sub-saharan-countries?limit=12&start=12#12208 www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/04/02/297...eating-dirt-revealed

Still, plenty of animals eat feces (coprophagy), infusing the gut with probiotics.

Some "hygiene hypothesis" proponents actually promote poor sanitation as a way to balance the immune system. Worms have benefits, too, used in helminth therapy. But to promote poor sanitation isn't really the message. What we really need to promote is diversity and a balance of microbes, so the hygiene hypothesis has been renamed "Old Friends hypothesis".]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:17:24 +0000
Gut-Brain Connection and Sanitation - by: KeithBell http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12206-gut-brain-connection-and-sanitation#12206 http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/26-health-issues-and-connections-with-sanitation/12206-gut-brain-connection-and-sanitation#12206
Gut-brain research is now exploding. The gut is linked to brain maladies including depression.
According to the World Health Organization, three-quarters of the world’s neuropsychiatric disorders are in low-income or low-middle income countries.

opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/18...lage-at-a-time/?_r=0

Is anyone currently talking about the link between poor sanitation and depression?

What is the most burdensome disease in the world today? According to the World Health Organization, the disease that robs the most adults of the most years of productive life is not AIDS, not heart disease, not cancer. It is depression.


Cytokines are induced by LPS (gram-negative bacterial toxins) and modulate serotonergic transmission in the brain:
From inflammation to sickness and depression: when the immune system subjugates the brain
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2919277/

The gut-brain barrier in major depression: intestinal mucosal dysfunction with an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) plays a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18283240]]>
Health issues and connections with sanitation Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:51:27 +0000