Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

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Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

For more information about why I am creating this new thread, please see here:
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/10-gen...d-sub-category-level

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This thread is a "sticky thread" which means it will always remain at the top of this sub-category.
It contains a recommendation and orientation for newcomers regarding the most important 3-5 documents and website links in this thematic area.

Recommended top 5 documents in the thematic area of "Environmental enteropathy", in reverse chronological order:


(1)
Mbuya, M. N., Humphrey, J. H. (2015). Preventing environmental enteric dysfunction through improved water, sanitation and hygiene: an opportunity for stunting reduction in developing countries. Maternal & Child Nutrition, Early View (DOI: 10.1111/mcn.12220)
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mcn.12220/full

In 2011, one in every four (26%) children under 5 years of age worldwide was stunted. The realization that most stunting cannot be explained by poor diet or by diarrhoea, nor completely reversed by optimized diet and reduced diarrhoea has led to the hypothesis that a primary underlying cause of stunting is subclinical gut disease. Essentially, ingested microbes set in motion two overlapping and interacting pathways that result in linear growth impairment.


(2)
Chambers, R., von Medeazza, G. (2014). Reframing undernutrition: faecally-transmitted Infections and the 5 As. IDS Working Paper 450, Institue of Development Studies (IDS), Brighton, UK (ISBN: 978-1-78118-205-5)
www.susana.org/en/resources/library/details/2386

When it comes to malnutrition, reductionist focus on the diarrhoeas, which are serious, dramatic, visible and measurable, but has led to the relative neglect of many other often subclinical and continuously debilitating faecally-transmitted infections (FTIs) including environmental enteropathy (EE), other intestinal infections, and parasites. These are harder to measure but together affect nutrition much more.


(3)
Schmidt, C. W. (2014). Beyond Malnutrition - The Role of Sanitation in Stunted Growth. Environmental Health Perspectives, volume 122, issue 11, pages A298-A303
www.susana.org/en/resources/library/details/2151

Researchers are exploring the possibility that poor hygiene and a lack of sanitation induce a gut disorder called environmental enteropathy (EE) that diverts energy from growth toward an ongoing fight against subclinical infection. Nutritionists are now collaborating with experts in a field known as water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), and their combined efforts are helping to galvanize regional programs to improve hygiene in countries afflicted with high stunting rates.


(4)
Ngure, F. M., Reid, B. M., Humphrey, J. H., Mbuya, M. N., Pelto, G., Stoltzfus, R. J. (2014). Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), environmental enteropathy, nutrition, and early child development: making the links. The New York Academy of Science
www.susana.org/en/resources/library/details/2121

Environmental enteropathy, a prevalent subclinical condition of the gut, may be a keymediating pathway linking poor hygiene to developmental deficits. Current early child development research and programs lack evidence-based interventions to provide a clean play and infant feeding environment in addition to established priorities of nutrition, stimulation, and child protection. This report proposes the concept of baby WASH as an additional component of early childhood development programs.


(5)
Prendergast, A., Kelly, P. (2012). Enteropathies in the Developing World: Neglected Effects on Global Health. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, volume 86, issue 5, pages 756-763
www.ajtmh.org/content/86/5/756.full

A spectrum of enteropathies, characterized by small intestinal inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and increased intestinal permeability, commonly affect people in developing countries. Environmental enteropathy (EE), ubiquitous among people living in unhygienic conditions, likely mediates two interlinked public health problems of childhood, stunting and anemia, and underlies poor oral vaccine efficacy in developing countries. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enteropathy, which frequently overlaps with EE, may contribute to immune activation and modulate HIV disease progression.


Or (to be decided upon!):
(5b)
Korpe, P. S., Petri, W. A. (2012). Environmental Enteropathy: Critical implications of a poorly understood condition. Trends in Molecular Medicine, volume 18, issue 6, pages 328–336
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3372657/

Environmental enteropathy (also called tropical enteropathy) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination and resulting in blunting of intestinal villi and intestinal inflammation. Although these histological changes were discovered decades ago, the clinical impact of environmental enteropathy is just starting to be recognized. This review examines literature and potential mechanisms of pathogenesis for this poorly understood condition.


You can find further important documents and website links dealing with this topic here: Please provide your feedback. What do you think of this selection?

Regards,
Elisabeth

Dr. Elisabeth von Muench
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  • phynes
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

There is a great review paper on WASH and EED by Mbuya Mduduzi and Jean Humphrey. It is called "Preventing environmental enteric dysfunction through improved water, sanitation and hygiene: an opportunity for stunting reduction in developing countries." You can find the article here: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mcn.12220/full . I think it is a great top 5 article but can we at least include it in the library?

I love this thread! It's a great source of information.
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  • F H Mughal
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

The attached paper: "Environmental Enteropathy and Impaired Growth in Rural Bangladesh," is interesting. The aspect worth noting is that the paper discusses the "household environmental conditions," and their association with enteropathy and impaired growth in rural Bangladesh.

F H Mughal

F H Mughal (Mr.)
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

Thank you a lot for your feedback!

Peter, the paper you proposed sounds quite interesting and from 2015 it is also a really new one. What do you (and everyone else) think, which one of the documents should be replaced by the Mbuya review paper?

Best,
milli

Danijela Milosevic
M.Sc. Environmental and Resource Management
Gießen, Germany
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

I would replace the Humphrey 2009 paper as it is quoted in both this review article and the Ngure 2014 paper, so its information is well represented in the other articles. Other thoughts?
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

Dear Peter,

according to your suggestion and since there haven't been other thoughts, I replaced the Humphrey paper from 2009 by the one that you proposed. Since it is the most recent one, it's on the top of the list now.

Best,
milli

Danijela Milosevic
M.Sc. Environmental and Resource Management
Gießen, Germany
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

One suggestion on searching for newer references is to add the search term 'environmental enteric dysfunction'as this categorization/name seems to be replacing 'environmental enteropathy' among medical researchers. An earlier parallel was the displacement of 'tropical enteropathy' by 'environmental enteropathy'. As awareness deepens, the conceptualizations change.

I am currently writing a book on the effects of EE/EED on nutritional outcomes and lifelong welfare. I'm happy to post draft chapters, conference papers and newly discovered references if there is interest.
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Re: Key documents for the sub-category on environmental enteropathy

Dear Bill,

I would love to have your draft book, conference papers and newly discovered references.

Regards,

F H Mughal

F H Mughal (Mr.)
Karachi, Pakistan
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