Global Sanitation Fund updates
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Re: Global Sanitation Fund-supported programmes empower close to 10 million to end open defecation in 13 countries (WSSCC) 25 Oct 2015 18:43 #15615

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    mwaniki
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Hi Okechukwu

Thanks for the insight of the GSF-funded programmes.

But Dr Meshack Ndirangu the Country Director of AMREF, the executing agency of the USD$ 5 Million GSF contract was quoted as having said “……, AMREF Kenya will have the objective of moving 755,400 people from open defecation to using basic latrines, help more than 200 villages to be certified open defecation free, and move a further 377,700 people from basic latrines to improved sanitation facilities. In addition to this, the implementing organizations will have to work to improve the capacity of 500 officers from the government and private sector. Once this is achieved, it is estimated that Kenya will have reached the 2020 target by 80% in the selected sub-counties.”

Kindly note the time frame – 5 years. In Kenya, the progamme will also promote handwashing with soap and adoption of appropriate hygiene practices; increase access to sanitation and adoption of hygiene behavior.

I’ll have to study and do some research from the material you have put forth and especially the websites to understand the GSF results.

Best regards / Mwaniki
Am the publisher of the Africa Water,Sanitation & Hygiene and the C.E.O. of Transworld Publishers Ltd.,Nairobi-Kenya.

Tapping into the Power of the Toilet - article in Huffington Post 07 Dec 2015 07:44 #16176

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    F H Mughal
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The Power of Toilets


Review of various posts on sanitation shows that the construction of toilets alone, is not sufficient, in themselves, to improve sanitation, or ending the open defecation. The power of toilets will be visible only when there is behavioral change.

A recent post, jointly authored by Chris W. Williams, Executive Director, Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), and Christian Holmes, Deputy Assistant Administrator in USAID's Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment, and the Agency's first Global Water Coordinator, titled: “Tapping into the Power of the Toilet,” (available at www.huffingtonpost.com/chris-w-williams/...oilet_b_8592332.html), gives some solutions, and some basic facts.

In brief, some of the points in the post are:


• The Millennium Development Goals’ target to halve the proportion of the population without sustainable access to basic sanitation fell short by almost 700 million. One in three people still live without access to adequate sanitation, 1 billion people defecate in the open, and 748 million people live without access to improved drinking water.

• An estimated 1,500 children die every day from diarrhea largely caused by a lack of access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene -- more than AIDS, malaria, and measles combined.

• Poor sanitation alone may also be responsible for as much as half of the world's stunting problems, due to diarrhea and related malnutrition. And poor sanitation prevents people from attending work and school due to illness, causing numerous negative economic impacts.

• The good news is that governments around the world are paying greater attention to the sanitation crisis, and recognizing that sustainable, appropriate, low cost, and culturally appropriate technologies exist, and are an important component of a broader system-based approach needed to safely manage sanitation waste.
(This may be true in some countries; however, in most poor developing countries, the governments are not paying any attention, as there is no political will – F H Mughal)

• Governments are also starting to work with local communities to allocate resources and address the basic needs of their people. This means prioritizing sanitation in national development plans and strategies, and providing budget support to meet these goals.
(This is one solution – the governments need to work with local communities – F H Mughal)

• Investing in WASH is not only about saving human lives and dignity, it is essential for sustainable investments in human development.

• Previously, it was assumed that building toilets was sufficient for achieving total sanitation. However, we have learned that in practice this is not the case. All too often large sums of money were spent on building toilets for communities that were either poorly maintained or never even used.

• 100 per cent latrine coverage is not achievable with this approach (building toilets) nor is it enough to mitigate sanitation and hygiene-related diseases. Not surprisingly the answer lies in an a more sophisticated and comprehensive systems-based approach that includes stopping open defecation through sustained hygienic behavior change at scale while increasing the ability of communities, towns and cities to safely manage sanitation waste and prevent it from contaminating the environment and causing diseases.

• WSSCC's financing arm, the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF), gathers and channels donor funding to community-led programs in Africa and Asia. Thanks to GSF-supported programs, close to 10 million people in 13 countries no longer defecate in the open - and more people join their ranks every day. This is evidence that behavior change is an effective way to improve sanitation at scale in countries with very high rates of open defecation in a relatively short period of time. Sanitation is also a sound economic investment, for every dollar invested in sanitation, 5.5 dollars are gained in return.


The main thrust, for achieving success in sanitation, is on behavior change. Global Sanitation Fund – Progress Report 2014 shows good progress for India.

While in Pakistan, there are no sustained efforts for behavior change in sanitation, the fact is that the sanitation scenario continues to be poor in Pakistan, especially in the rural areas.

F H Mughal
F H Mughal (Mr.)
Karachi, Pakistan

Re: Tapping into the Power of the Toilet - article in Huffington Post 09 Dec 2015 15:17 #16211

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    arno
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The numbers are impressive. 10 million people in 13 countries now ODF thanks to GSF-funded projects. Question is what these data are based on. Actual ground-truthed data or funded programmes?
Wondering if WSSCC or the beneficiary countries provide monitoring data on these projects in terms of whether the toilets have been built and inspected, level of use and permanency? Do the JMP-published surveys corroborate these data?
Arno Rosemarin PhD
Stockholm Environment Institute
Linnegatan 87D, Box 24218
10451 Stockholm, Sweden
arno.rosemarin@sei-international.org
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Re: Tapping into the Power of the Toilet - article in Huffington Post 13 Dec 2015 13:44 #16242

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    DavidAlan
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Arno, I am sure somebody from WSSCC will correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the data is derived largely from people who have undergone CLTS training, so not many toilets built.

Re: Global Sanitation Fund-supported programmes empower close to 10 million to end open defecation in 13 countries (WSSCC) 21 Dec 2015 14:05 #16333

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    Carolienvandervoorden
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Dear Mr. Mughal,

Many thanks for providing an overview of and feedback on the Huffington Post article authored by our Executive Director and Christian Holmes from USAID. As mentioned in a previous post we do not currently work in Pakistan, but we are considering opportunities for engagement, to help improve the sanitation scenario together with national and international partners.

Dear Arno and David,

Thanks for your enquiries and interest. Processes for monitoring and verifying the results of GSF-supported programmes vary across the 13 countries we work in, but all programmes generally include the following aspects:
The results we publish are based on reports submitted to the GSF by Executing Agencies (EAs), based on information received from Sub-grantees (typically local government bodies and NGOs). Sub-grantees perform regular monitoring and verification of all communities that self-declare their ODF status, and EAs monitor a certain sample of the communities reported as ODF by the Sub-grantees. In addition different countries have different national/civil society monitoring and verification protocols with which the GSF programmes align themselves. EAs report to the GSF every six months according to country-specific monitoring and verification systems and standards. Additionally, EAs and GSF-contracted Country Programme Monitors carry out periodic spot checks in communities, as per agreed regular monitoring procedures. Independent outcome surveys and mid-term evaluations are also carried out for these country programmes.

While we track many more indicators, our progress reports habitually publish figures on the number of targeted communities that have been ‘triggered’ to carry out CLTS; the number of communities declared and verified to be ODF and the number of people living in these communities,as well as the number of improved toilets that have been improved or built in/by communities in the course of the programme interventions that meet pre-determined national or programme criteria. Our data is not directly corroborated by the JMP, but together with other programmes and initiatives within the WASH sector, our programmes essentially contribute to the JMP’s reported results.

The GSF recognizes the importance of data reliability and the challenges associated with the monitoring of sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programmes at large scale. We are therefore continuously looking for ways to improve our monitoring and evaluation systems, including the development of independent results verification methodologies based on statistical methodologies, as well as ensuring alignment with as well as providing support to national monitoring systems. You will appreciate that sanitation and hygiene behaviours are not static and communities' ODF or improved sanitation status may change over time. As programmes such as GSF's are not directly able to monitor each and every community over extended periods of time (i.e thousands of villages), we are also investing heavily in strengthening local governance mechanisms that will have to take ultimate responsibility for continued follow-up and monitoring.

More information on our results can be found on page 4 of the 2014 GSF Progress Report, see: wsscc.org/resources-feed/global-sanitati...gress-report-2014-3/

We will also provide more details on the process in our upcoming Progress Report to be released in April 2016.


Best regards,
Carolien
Carolien van der Voorden
Senior Programme Officer
Global Sanitation Fund, WSSCC

Global Sanitation Fund reports advances in sanitation and hygiene for communities across 13 countries 16 Jun 2016 17:03 #18276

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    OUmelo
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Dear friends and colleagues,

A new report shows that the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) has supported governments and partners in 13 countries to advance sanitation and hygiene in targeted communities, through collective behaviour change programmes. The report:

  • Presents results achieved by GSF-supported country programmes and the Fund as a whole up to 31 December 2015, and explains the processes and challenges related to monitoring and verifying these results
  • Explains how the GSF works
  • Explores themes and aspects relevant to the GSF and the wider WASH sector, including: learning and innovation; sustainability; equality and non-discrimination; and how the GSF aims to contribute to universal coverage as envisioned in national strategies and Sustainable Development Goal 6.2
  • Highlights the progress, challenges, dynamism and unique characteristics of each GSF-supported programme
  • Presents the human aspect of the GSF – the diverse people, partners and champions that are central to the Fund’s impact


Read the news article or download the full report.

Kind regards,
Okechukwu Umelo
Media and Communications Officer, WSSCC/GSF
Last Edit: 16 Jun 2016 17:04 by OUmelo. Reason: Formatting

Global Sanitation Fund reflection paper: Catalytic programming for scale and sustainability 24 Oct 2016 08:39 #19395

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    OUmelo
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A new publication explores the conversations, reflections and lessons emerging from a multi-stakeholder Global Sanitation Fund learning event earlier this year. Themes include: incorporating effective approaches for scale, decentralized programme delivery and sustainability; ensuring a truly inclusive approach that leaves no one behind; and addressing monitoring and evaluation challenges. Download the paper in English or French on wsscc.org.

Global Sanitation Fund reflection paper: Understanding slippage 24 Oct 2016 08:41 #19396

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'Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change at scale: Understanding slippage' is a new reflection paper published by WSSCC's Global Sanitation Fund. The paper explores how to discern slippage nuances and patterns, strategies to address, pre-empt and mitigate it, as well as alternative monitoring systems that capture the complexity of slippage more fully. Download the paper in English or French on wsscc.org.
Last Edit: 26 Oct 2016 09:31 by OUmelo. Reason: Style change

Global Sanitation Fund case study: Gender & CLTS in Malagasy communities 09 Dec 2016 11:16 #19786

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In order to better understand the link between gender dynamics and the impact of its Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions, the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) supported a study in a small number of communities in Madagascar. A new ‘GSF in focus’ case study highlights and reflects on the study. Read the case study on wsscc.org or download the attachment below.

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Last Edit: 09 Dec 2016 11:21 by OUmelo.

Video: Real-time learning and documentation in Cambodia 13 Dec 2016 11:14 #19809

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    OUmelo
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In Cambodia, a Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme is using real-time and action learning techniques to increase its impact. The project focuses on generating real-time, emergent learning for implementing partners, to solve complex problems as they occur. Building on renowned research, the learning and documentation activities are designed to inform strategic implementation and support the rigorous documentation of knowledge and evidence. Through the continuous feedback and exchange generated through social media, pause and reflect sessions and workshops, implementing partners have been able to make adjustments to their approaches rapidly and in real time. This has facilitated better networking and relationship building, new ideas, and increased visibility for issues of common concern among stakeholders.

Last Edit: 13 Dec 2016 11:15 by OUmelo.

New GSF case study: Local governance and sanitation in Uganda - 8 lessons 10 Feb 2017 14:08 #20415

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    OUmelo
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Many non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, as well as bilateral and multilateral donors, recognize the importance of closely working with governments in sanitation and hygiene programmes. Collective behaviour change approaches, such as Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), are also increasingly being embraced by governments as an alternative to traditional subsidy and enforcement-based approaches. A new Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) case study presents eight lessons learned from the GSF-supported Uganda Sanitation Fund (USF) in coordinating, planning, and implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system.

Managed by Uganda's Ministry of Health, the USF is the largest programme of its kind in the country. By September 2016, the USF reported helping over three million people live in open defecation free environments.

Read the case study on wsscc.org or download the attachment below.
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Last Edit: 24 Feb 2017 14:49 by OUmelo. Reason: Link change
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