Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

  • kelldigest
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

I work in the wastewater industry in Ireland and have operated WWTP and AD Plant from 10 to 80,000 p.e in size.

Our systems are very energy hungry and I would like to promote low energy treatment systems.

ABR looks like a good option but for larger scale operations you would need a low energy way of removing ammonia. In Ireland a lot of effluent from treatment plants is discharged to water courses. For discharges to water courses, ammonia is often the limiting nutrient in discharge licences.



Can effluent from ABR to the start of the process. Would this help to remove ammonia or would this inhibit the process.


Kind Regards
Seamus Kelly
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  • kelldigest
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Just to clarify. The size of plants is 10 p.e. to 80,000 p.e.
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  • Nanchoz
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Dear Mr Kelly

Aerobic stabilization of organic pollution (TSS,COD,BOD) requires substantial amount of energy for aeration, agitation and pumping. Anaerobic treatment in "High Rate Anaerobic Reactors" like e.g. ABR can do this job with much lower energy requirement. But when it comes to Ammonia removal aerobic treatment is required since nitrification requires oxigen.
Hence it may be a valuable option to make anaerobic treamtment first and for ammonia reduction you may introduce an aerobic step afterwards.

Best Regards

N.Zimmermann
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  • F H Mughal
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Typically, energy costs are more in developed countries. My experience in developing country shows that aerobic systems can be cost-effective.

F H Mughal

F H Mughal (Mr.)
Karachi, Pakistan
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  • Bhaskar
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Growing Diatom Algae is a good way to deal with ammonia.

Diatoms consume ammonia and produce oxygen and the diatoms are consumed by zooplankton and fish, so they do not accumulate in the water unlike other algae.

Clean technology promoter.

I am working on a clean technology product to grow Diatom Algae in large waterways. Diatoms account for about 25% of all photosynthesis on Earth and hence are the best solution to consume CO2, N and P and oxygenate water and feed fish.

I am a Chartered Accountant but am now an entrepreneur focussed on clean technology.
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  • kelldigest
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Bhaskar,

For Ammonia in treatment plants do you have a suggestion on how a reactor or tank could be set up to test this.
What conditions are needed to promote diatoms?

Regards
Seamus.
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  • Bhaskar
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Any open tank will do to grow Diatoms. They require light for photosynthesis.

The tanks need not be of any particular type, a natural pond, a plastic sheet lined lagoon, etc., will do.

Retention time is important, Diatoms require a few days to consume the ammonia / other forms of N and phosphate, so if the tank is big enough to give retention time of more than 7 days, complete removal of nutrients is possible.

Diatoms can be grown even in the public waterways into which the treated sewage is being released into. This may not help you meet your license obligations of discharge limit at your discharge point, but will help keep the receiving water clean.

Clean technology promoter.

I am working on a clean technology product to grow Diatom Algae in large waterways. Diatoms account for about 25% of all photosynthesis on Earth and hence are the best solution to consume CO2, N and P and oxygenate water and feed fish.

I am a Chartered Accountant but am now an entrepreneur focussed on clean technology.
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  • kelldigest
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

I would imagine that this would be more suitable in a climate with higher temperatures and sunlight. This is scarce in northern Europe.

How are the diatoms harvested and used?

In Europe you cant feed animals to animals that have been fed on human waste(sewage).

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Seamus.
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  • Bhaskar
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Re: Ammonium in effluents of decentralised treatment plants

Diatom Algae grow even beneath ice -
Arctic - www.windows2universe.org/earth/polar/arctic_marine_life.html
Antarctic - blogs.jcvi.org/tag/diatom/
Lake Erie - www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0380133011002619

Diatoms are 'plants' not animals. They only consume the nutrients in the sewage.

Our process is so simple that you do not have to harvest the Diatoms, you can allow them to die and sediment.

Or you allow them to flow out with the treated sewage, the Diatoms would be consumed by the fish in the receiving waters. This is better than allowing nutrients to flow out, this only causes unwanted algae such as Cyanobacteria to bloom.

Farmers use manure to grow crops.
ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/n...king-most-pig-manure
"Traditionally, farmers disposed of this mix of urine, faeces and waste water by simply spreading it on the ground as fertiliser."

So what is the problem in growing algae in sewage and allowing fish to feed on the algae?

Clean technology promoter.

I am working on a clean technology product to grow Diatom Algae in large waterways. Diatoms account for about 25% of all photosynthesis on Earth and hence are the best solution to consume CO2, N and P and oxygenate water and feed fish.

I am a Chartered Accountant but am now an entrepreneur focussed on clean technology.
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