Check out our latest Finance Briefs on Public Finance for WASH!

  • pf4wash
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  • PF4WASH is a research and advocacy initiative around domestic public finance for water and sanitation. Public Finance for WASH was set up in late 2014 by a group of individuals from Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), IRC & Tremolet Consulting.
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Check out our latest Finance Briefs on Public Finance for WASH!

Haven't caught up with our Finance Briefs? Here they are!

Finance Brief 6: The UK Public Works Loans Board: central government loans for local government investment. By Richard Franceys

ABSTRACT: The UK’s Public Works Loans Board was a mechanism through which local government could access low-cost loans through central government. It played a key role in water and sanitation improvements in the UK between the 1870s and the 1980s. Until very recently, it remained a major vehicle for central-to-local government lending in the UK, and it has been a valuable template for many similar systems worldwide. This Finance Brief outlines the history of this body, still very relevant as a model today.

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/u...overnment-investment

Finance Brief 5: South Africa's Equitable Share Formula: a useful model for WASH financing? by Valeria Llano-Arias and Guy Norman

ABSTRACT: South Africa's Equitable Share Formula is a mechanism for transfer of funds from central to local government, to support basic services including water and sanitation. This Finance Brief outlines how the system works, and reports on its use for water and sanitation. There are a number of problems with implementation of the Equitable Share in South Africa; however, we consider that the mechanism per se is good, and can be a useful model for other countries.

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/f...model-wash-financing

Finance Brief 4: DRM and WASH in the Financing for Development agenda. By Catarina Fonseca

ABSTRACT: This Finance Brief summarises the increasing relevance of Domestic Resource Mobilisation (DRM) in supporting the ambitious goals of the Sustainable Development Agenda. It details how DRM is understood in key documents being prepared for the Financing for Development global meeting and what needs to happen to make public and private domestic finance relevant for supporting universal access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/d...g-development-agenda

Finance Brief 3: Municipal finance for sanitation in African cities. By Guy Norman and Sophie Trémolet

ABSTRACT: In cities in low and low-middle-income countries throughout the world, municipal budget allocations to sanitation are typically very low. Furthermore, detailed information on exactly how much money is budgeted, and how exactly it is spent, is very hard to obtain. This brief summarises recent data on budget allocations to sanitation in four African municipalities. The data is patchy and incomplete, but as far as we know this is the only published information currently available on municipal budget allocations to sanitation in African cities.

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/finance-brief-3

Finance Brief 2: Universal water and sanitation: how did the rich countries do it?. By Iwona Bisaga and Guy Norman.

ABSTRACT: In rich countries like the US and the UK, efforts to provide universal water and sanitation began in the 19th century, and have resulted in near-100% coverage. Today, low and low-middle-income countries face a challenge in many respects similar to that faced by these wealthier countries 150 years ago. So how exactly did the rich countries finance water and sanitation coverage? Was private enterprise the main driver, or was investment led by governments? This Finance Brief briefly summarises the history of water and sanitation services provision in the US, the UK, and South Korea, and considers whether this historical experience is relevant to low and middle-income countries today.

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/f...rich-countries-do-it

Finance Brief 1: Domestic public finance for WASH: what, why, how? By Guy Norman, Catarina Fonseca and Sophie Trémolet.

ABSTRACT: We define domestic public finance essentially as funds derived from domestic taxes, raised at the national or local level: for example, taxation revenues raised by the national government of Kenya or the municipal government of Nairobi. Of course, domestic public finance is only part of the solution: service delivery in poor communities will invariably involve a mix of a) domestic public finance (derived from taxes and other sources of government revenue), b) user finance (derived from household payments for services received, i.e. from tariffs), and c) donor finance (i.e. development aid). Likewise, domestic public finance forms part of a wider governance puzzle: improving WASH services requires not just more government investment, but also diverse other elements including (for example) clear institutional mandates.

www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/finance-brief-1

PF4WASH
Website www.publicfinanceforwash.com
Twitter @pf4wash
Facebook: www.facebook.com/publicfinanceforwash

*Check out our most recent Finance Brief here:
www.publicfinanceforwash.com/ZkA
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  • pf4wash
  • pf4wash's Avatar
    Topic Author
  • Regular forum user
  • PF4WASH is a research and advocacy initiative around domestic public finance for water and sanitation. Public Finance for WASH was set up in late 2014 by a group of individuals from Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), IRC & Tremolet Consulting.
  • Posts: 11
  • Likes received: 0

Re: NEW FINANCE BRIEF! How can research drive public finance for WASH?

Finance Brief 7: Evidence into Policy: How Research has Influenced Kenyan Government Budgets for School Wash

ABSTRACT: This Finance Brief analyses how the SWASH+ research-and-advocacy project has aimed to provide evidence to the Kenyan government around WASH for schools. With a strong research-into-policy focus, and with deep government commitment from the start, this project has mobilised substantial increases in central government finance for WASH in schools. The project was funded mainly by theBill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and implementation was led by Emory University as lead research partner, CARE as supporting NGO, and GoK as active partner.a

LANGUAGE: English

publicfinanceforwash.com/Zks
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PF4WASH
Website www.publicfinanceforwash.com
Twitter @pf4wash
Facebook: www.facebook.com/publicfinanceforwash

*Check out our most recent Finance Brief here:
www.publicfinanceforwash.com/ZkA

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